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Beloved

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Toni Morrison's Haunting Novel

A child is a gift which cannot be compared to any in the world, but when a child is murdered for the mother's survival, its spirit lingers on in the thoughts and nightmares of the family. Beloved by Toni Morrison is a haunting novel of a mother and daughter, their strug...
A child is a gift which cannot be compared to any in the world, but when a child is murdered for the mother's survival, its spirit lingers on in the thoughts and nightmares of the family. Beloved by Toni Morrison is a haunting novel of a mother and daughter, their struggles to survive the shadows of their past, and the secrets that hold them back in irrefutable ways. The deeply troubled main characters and bone chilling plot takes place in a haunting setting which keeps the pages turning and the reader wanting more, even after the novel has ended. MOrrison wrote this novel with spellbounding emotion that can hadrdly be compared to any work of fiction I have ever read. Morrison's brilliant masterpiece transposes the mind of the reader into the time of the Civil War, where escaped slaves are continuously disturbed by their precedent.

posted by Anonymous on February 28, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Good.

I was very apprehensive about reading Beloved. I heard nothing but bad things about it from the people I know. So I went into it with a bad attitude. After reading the first couple chapters I understood Toni's writing style and was able to really get into it. I was neve...
I was very apprehensive about reading Beloved. I heard nothing but bad things about it from the people I know. So I went into it with a bad attitude. After reading the first couple chapters I understood Toni's writing style and was able to really get into it. I was never bored and I was able to put myself in the story. During one chapter I was literally breathless when it ended! It was that real. Parts of this novel are creepy, and I think that is what makes it so unique. You will feel many emotions while reading. It's a feeling that doesn't happen very much. I do have to say, I think people who know a lot about slavery will get more out of this, as it is a book about slavery. A couple things that were mentioned confused me and I had to look them up. I think this is a great book that you should not hesitate to pick up. It is extremely unique and will keep you reading!

posted by DeDeFlowers on April 23, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2007

    Toni Morrison's Haunting Novel

    A child is a gift which cannot be compared to any in the world, but when a child is murdered for the mother's survival, its spirit lingers on in the thoughts and nightmares of the family. Beloved by Toni Morrison is a haunting novel of a mother and daughter, their struggles to survive the shadows of their past, and the secrets that hold them back in irrefutable ways. The deeply troubled main characters and bone chilling plot takes place in a haunting setting which keeps the pages turning and the reader wanting more, even after the novel has ended. MOrrison wrote this novel with spellbounding emotion that can hadrdly be compared to any work of fiction I have ever read. Morrison's brilliant masterpiece transposes the mind of the reader into the time of the Civil War, where escaped slaves are continuously disturbed by their precedent.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    The book review of Beloved

    Book Review of Beloved Beloved is a book that when you look at the cover the first thing that probably comes to people¿s mind is that the book might by boring. Beloved is anything, but boring. The novel is very interesting and everyone should read it at least once. This novel is by Toni Morrison and in the novel it starts off with a foreword, which tells how the author came about. The story is based on a lady name Margaret Gardner and she adds in some of her own ideas and plots. The novel takes place back during slavery time, therefore, it has many racial actions and the death of many loved ones. It also has some small aspects of the story such as structure metaphors and many other events that happen. In this story a major event happened that changed many lives forever. ¿ When the four horseman came schoolteacher, one nephew, one slave catcher and a sheriff the house on Bluestone Road was quiet they thought they were too late.¿ ¿Inside, two boys bled in the sawdust and dirt at the feet of a nigger woman holding a blood- soaked child to her chest with one hand and an infant by the heels in the other. She did not look at them she simply swung the baby toward the wall planks, missed and tried to connect a second time, when out of nowhere in the tricking time the men spent starting at what there was to stare at the old nigger boy, still mewing, ran through the door behind them and snatched the baby from the arc of it¿s mother¿s swing.¿ ¿ Right off it was clear, to schoolteacher especially, that there was nothing there to claim.¿ The only children that survived that horrible tragedy was three kids and one of the children died. Not only did she have to deal with that lost, but she always loses her husband, which no one know what happened to him. In the novel it says ¿Yet it was to the Clearing that Sethe determined to go to pay tribute to Halle. Before the light changed, while it was still the green blessed place she remembered: misty with plant steam and the decay of berries.¿Through the story an old friend came back into her life and his name was Paul D,however at this point of time their friendship became more. Paul D who is also a victim of this racism and the lost of loved ones. ¿ Mister, he looked so¿free. Better than me. Stronger, together. Son a bitch couldn¿t even get out the shell by hisself but he was still and I was¿¿ Paul D stopped and squeezed his left hand with his right. He held it that way long enough for it and the world to quiet down and let him go on.¿ ¿ A fully dressed woman walked out of the water. She barely gained the dry bank of the stream before she sat down and leaned against a mulberry tree. All day and all night she sat there, her head resting on the trunk in a position abandoned enough to crack the brim in her straw hat.¿ However,Sethe doesn¿t know where came from or why she came, but she takes her into the comfort of her home. They found out that her name was Beloved. Denver knew who Beloved was and Paul D is very uneasy around her, he thinks she¿s evil. He tries to stay away from her as much as possible. As time went on Sethe began to realize who she was she was the daughter of Sethe who died. Beloved caused many problems that affected everyone¿s life. As a result at the end of the story a group of church women came to the house and stood outside in the front and prayed until Beloved came out the house. At the end Beloved vanished away and no one ever saw her again and everything was at peace and went back to normal. Another aspec

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    Wonderful.

    Haunting and vivid. It is an incredible story, though occasionally slw. But completely worth it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    Still Thinking

    Not sure what to say about this one. Parts were brilliant and parts were just nonsense. Overall a good, albeit disturbing book that I'll likely think about for a while.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    “Beloved”, a fiction but not so fiction novel writt

    “Beloved”, a fiction but not so fiction novel written by Toni Morrison, is a stunning portrayal of the before and after life of a runaway slave. I must warn that this book is not for the lighthearted, for it recreates the gruesome realities of slavery. I will call this story a ghost story, to which some others may not agree. The beginning of this novel was not so eye catching, featuring many grotesque memories in the first few chapters, mixed in with a load of names that you aren’t sure how to pronounce, like Sethe and Halle. But as you move deeper into this book’s pages, it becomes apparent that this is an amazing and heart wrenching tale of an escaped slave gone mad through repression and the fact that she murdered her own daughter in order to keep her from slavery. When the reader is finally able to be immersed in the story line after the plot comes together, intense recollections cause this to be a book that is hard to put down. The end of each chapter raises its own question, causing a sense of mystery that won’t change, even upon completion of the book. This Pulitzer Prize winning novel will not only catch the reader’s heart, but it will cause them to cringe at the same time. It will also never cease to confuse. With a tangle of different viewpoints and time periods, it is hard to catch up with. I don’t mean to scare readers away with these aspects, because once they are past the original confusion, they will be immersed in a wonderfully written and touching story that also shows the realities of early America. I give Toni Morrison a thumbs up for this great part of American literature.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    Interesting

    Great story regarding the history of slavery and mother's love. Sometimes hard to follow.

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  • Posted June 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A thought-provoking read.

    The topic of slavery is quite fascinating, and this well-written book certainly adds to the intrigue. It certainly seems worth a second read for better understanding. The well developed style of the writing makes the text captivating, and the historical and cultural details make it educational.

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  • Posted March 21, 2011

    great book

    although it was a little difficult to read at times, but overall it was a really great book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2008

    Confused

    When I Read toward the end, i didn't get all the poetical stuff in there, but overall, i enjoyed the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    The Slavery and Spirits

    i chose beloved book and wrote about it and how was blacks people were suffering in this novel and i am intersted to recognize more about this kind of book and i hope i understand the right definitions of beloved and the ghost so i highly recommended who liked to understandthis book because it included alot of information about the spirits and slaverly in general so the author toni morrison is speaking in the past of what happend to sethe and her childerent also i hope you read this novel, and get the full meaning of beloved.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    A very well written novel!!!

    When I first looked at the title of this novel, I predicted that I am going to read a novel of romance and love ironically it had nothing to do with such. ¿Beloved¿ a novel written by Toni Morrison has its own unique artistic touch of Afro-American literature. Toni Morrison uniquely adds art to her literature and to her writing to make it interesting and exiting. By doing this she unintentionally catches the eye of the reader also she grabs the reader and puts him in check, that way the reader is forced by the prominence of the novel to read on, and finish the novel. ¿Beloved¿ starts out in a very distinctive way, by giving a number. By giving this number Morrison confused me as a reader and automatically attracted me to keep on reading. In the novel we have four main characters, Sethe, Denver, Paul D, and Beloved. Sethe was the mother of Denver. Sethe had a horrifying and a cruel life before she got to 124. Before 124, 124 was the address of were Sethe and her daughter currently live, Sethe was in Kentucky and lived with other slaves at sweet home. At sweet home Mrs. Garner and Mr. Garner the slave owners owned 6 male slaves and one female slave. After Mr. Garner died Mrs. Garner started to get on debt, consequently, another white male was sent to help Mrs. Garner in her running Sweet Home. This white male was Schoolteacher. He was a cruel white man that disrespected the Afro-American slaves and treated them like animals. Being the boss at Sweet Home, schoolteacher brought along couple of his nephews. He was willing to teach them how to treat the Afro-American slaves, especially, when Schoolteacher was teaching his nephews about the human characteristics and animal characteristics of Sethe. When Sethe was pregnant, Schoolteachers nephews raped Sethe and took her milk. Also at 124 an incident occurs, by this incident ¿Beloved¿ reaches its climax. Four men came after Sethe trying to reach her kids so they can confiscate them, out of her love and care to them she intended and aimed to protect them and make sure they aren¿t going to go back and go through exactly what she went through, so she killed a child, attempted to kill the rest of her children but was forced to stopped. Denver was the daughter of Sethe. Sethe tried to ironically protect her by killing her, surprisingly she didn¿t succeed. Denver wanted to leave from 124 because she didn¿t want to be different then the other children. Sethe didn¿t let her leave because Sethe was happy living away from the rest of society. When Denver was introduced to Beloved at first site she was suspicious and disliked her. But after a while Denver started to care about her, and made sure that Beloved wasn¿t harmed by what Denver did or said. Paul D was one of the Sweet Home men he ran away from Sweet Home and made his way north. He was close friends with Halle, the husband of Sethe Halle was also one of the Sweet Home men. When Paul D went and visited Sethe he told her let us make a new family. Paul D cared about Sethe and Denver but truly and obviously hated Beloved. Beloved on the other hand, came in a very surprising way. The way she came and the way she introduced herself to Sethe, Denver, and Paul D was a very attention-grabbing part of the novel. She came out of a river, dressed up with very neat cloths, was very tired, wet, and thirsty, and she walked into the house as if it were her own. When I was introduced to Beloved I became more attached to the novel and became addicted to it as if it were some type of drug addictive pill. Beloved had a very affectionate role in the novel. She was like a virus Sethe, Denver and Paul D needed to find a cure for this virus that was spreading around in 124. The way Toni Morrison uses art in the novel is very creative. She uses it in a way that me as a reader doesn¿t realize it unless I really study the novel. The way she confuses me a

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    The Enrichment of Human Experience

    Toni Morrison¿s novel, Beloved, is enriching and well worth the time it takes to read. Although the writing style may seem confusing, the novel¿s unique style and compelling plot leave the reader with feelings of empathy for all of mankind. Whatever knowledge one has of slavery, this first hand account displays the abusive affects it can have on people long after the physical labor. I would recommend this book to anyone who looks for something different and challenging. Like no other, this book will forever produce an understanding for the indescribable events encircling the life of Margaret Garner. Due to being based on a real life account, the story contains detailed emotion and a direct relation to previous social concerns. The suggestive theme of supernatural beings has a certain purpose that allows the reader to make their own inferences. It simply offers an explanation for life¿s many unexplainable situations. One can learn a lot from Toni Morrison, and I give Beloved my utmost recommendation. Presenting the topic of slavery through their recollections are Sethe and Paul D. We find Sethe living with her daughter Denver, and mother-in-law Baby Suggs, in a small yet corrupted house. There are implications of a ¿dark presence¿ living with them. It goes on to reveal that Sethe had other children of whom no longer reside with Sethe. She had two boys, Howard and Buglar, and a baby, simply referred to as ¿Beloved.¿ The boys fled due to supernatural behavior caused by the deceased baby. We do not learn the cause of death until later chapters. An old friend of Sethe¿s, Paul D. came from the plantation she used to enslaved upon. He comes to their home, referred to as 124, in hopes of starting a new life with Sethe and Denver. The novel includes their recollections of the past at ¿Sweet Home¿ where they endured traumatic events that led to their downfalls later in life. The heart wrenching story behind the loss of her baby shows just how seriously polluted Sethe¿s mind had become. The combination of tragedy and a mother¿s love could not be better connected. Beloved pushes the boundaries of what may be socially acceptable and results in the dismissal of her sanity. Upon investigation of Sethe¿s actions the reader becomes the judge. A number of proposed questions present themselves in the novel though their answers may be somewhat hidden. Questions like: Can a person¿s situation justify extreme decisions? What can be considered going to far? How have race relations changed over the decades? And what effects do the treatment of people have on their ability to decide? Exploring all these can lead to meaningful discussed upon completion of the novel. Toni Morrison uses her writing style in order to develop the novel in a number of ways. The most obvious is the use of stream of consciousness writing when the characters recall the past. How they remembered shows the way they dealt with the problems and responded to the new events. When Denver reveals the fear she feels around her mother, Morrison writes it in a understanding manner so that reader can grasp her emotions. Denver feels torn between sticking by her mother, or running from the idea that she might attempt to hurt her. There are many other conflicts that can be found in this novel. The way Morrison uses stream of consciousness helps the reader to actually believe the thoughts of the characters. The author also uses a continuing pattern of confusing chapters where the reader may be lost as to the events in the novel. This should not be considered an accident. The vagueness and spontaneity causes the reader to draw their own conclusions as to what the story says. The thought-provoking nature of the novel gives it endless possibilities so it may be read over and over with a different inference every time. The disorder should not to be taken as a warning. I decided to mention this so that it can be expected and will be better

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    The aspects of slavery, Beloved provides.

    Beloved is the story of a family of former slaves, living in the South. Not only is this book about slavery, but about history from the past that is a never forgotten legacy of people in the world. The minute I started reading this novel, I thought it was brilliant piece of work that tells me as a reader a great deal of history. It just made me want to keep reading to see what happens next. Just the way Morrison wrote this novel has gave me a totally different outlook on what happened during slavery times, even if some parts were fictional or non fictional. Toni Morrison¿s masterpiece novel has been a winner for her great piece of writing, by taking people¿s minds off the typical stereotype of black people, such has the ghetto life and the way some African American¿s live their lives. Morrison is taking American¿s minds from the certain stereotypes that African American¿s make people think, Morrison brings up a total different aspect of black people lives, and about a family of former slaves that go through tremendous hard times to fight for survival. Beloved is a powerful tale of redemption that creates life out of death, motherhood out of cruelty, and forgotten history out of silence. This novel centers on Sethe, escaped from slavery, but haunted by its legacy, literally in the ghost of her first daughter Beloved. The haunting of Sethe's first born daughter, Beloved, has now come back after Sethe escaped from slavery. Sethe was a very important character in this novel because of her escaping from slaves and building a family alone. Sethe broke free, finally to find freedom. Sethe was carrying her baby at the time, by the name of Denver. Denver is an important character in this novel because of life she had to live, to find out what her mother was all about. When Sethe came across a white girl named Amy. Amy went out of what her white race, what the white folks usually don¿t do. She does this during slavery time to help Sethe, an African American woman that was on the verge to having Denver. Sethe never knew that someone out of her race ever would do something so kind. That is why this aspect of the book is a very significant scene of the novel. Amy now, has the remembrance of Sethe and the say she basically saved Denver¿s life. They both think back at that time, when Denver asked her mother to tell her again about Amy. Sethe and Denver went on home to the house that was called 124. As a reader, 124 has this name that keeps the reader thinking because of why it has a name. This house, 124, is where Baby Suggs, the grandmother, once lived, but is dead now from all the pain from slavery that busted her entire body up. Also living at 124 was the two sons Howard and Buglar that had ran away at the age thirteen. They had run away from all the ghostly things that were going on around the house. They took of immediately when Howard saw handprints in the cake that was all he had to see. On the other hand the signal for Buglar to get the run on out of there was, ¿As soon as merely looking in a mirror shattered it.¿(Toni Morrison, p.3). There is just scary sort of situations going on in 124, stuff the kids didn¿t even know about and what the mother, Sethe, did during when she was a slave and what she did to her children. Sethe and Denver were doing quite fine living at home with the two of them. Denver now is Eighteen years old. Paul D walked into 124 and couldn¿t believe how old Denver was by how long it¿s been since he had seen her last. Paul D. was an old friend of Sethe¿s long lost husband. Halle was his name, and he ran away from the disturbing and most disgustedly thing that could possibly happen to Sethe. She is just a runaway slave that had her milk taken away from a couple of white folks, doing what there race is supposed to do. Halle had to leave because it disturbed him tremendously. This is when Paul D comes into the picture reaching is crush he had on Sethe the second he layed eyes on her, back when he was friends wi

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    Review of Beloved

    The book beloved is a must read book for every person that enjoys literature. It shows the struggle of American society during slavery. This book gives the idea of what families went through and sacrifices that had to be taken. The book beloved starts with the description of Seth and her daughter Denver. They both live at 124, a house in a rural area close to Cincinnati. They are abandoned from the community for Seth¿s past and her pride. Seth was born on a plantation, she¿s the child of a African born slave woman whose name she never knew. As a teenager, she was brought in a home called sweet home, where she was serving the brutal slave master who goes by schoolteacher. He was a crazy slave master that would conduct experiments on black people. He treated them like a biologist would treat animals. At one point during the story, Seth escapes from slavery but she is then tracked down by schoolteacher. Refusing to let her children go back, she successfully kills one of her kids. This shows how Seth hated slavery, she didn¿t want her children to suffer under the whippings of their masters. Slavery was an institution based on a relationship of dominance and submission, whereby one person owns another and can exact from that person labor or other services. Seth was a mother who though that killing her child would be the right thing. Her killing doesn¿t show in the book whether it is right or not. The murder of her baby, who¿s ghost is known as beloved, comes back to haunt Seth and the rest of her family at 124. Beloved is the expression not only of the baby¿s ghost, but also the legacy of slavery. She represents the power of the past to interfere into the present. Beloved hunts the house in any way possible. She makes chairs move, tables tremble, and walls change colors. At one point of the story, she makes her 2 brothers run away from 124 who are never heard from again. Howard and Bugler are Seth¿s sons and her 2 older children. She has periodic dreams of her boys walking away from her who are unable to hear their mother¿s cry. Seth is desperate even more due to the escape of her children from 124. She has no idea what happened to them. It shows as if she wishes that she succeeded on killing both instead of being captured by schoolteacher. To her opinion, they could¿ve been in heaven with their baby sister Beloved. Seth would¿ve at least told herself that she knew where she sent her sons, which is to a happier place. This happier place would be heaven, after she would kill them. Throughout the story, a lady called Amy Denver helps Seth during her escape to the north by saving her life. Amy also helps Seth to deliver her baby. Even that slavery was going on, not all white people followed it. Some white people protested against slavery. White people would also be scared to protest against slavery due to lynching. Lynching is the process of execution without due process of law, especially to hang, as by a mob. Seth was in need of companionship of a man. This man is Paul D, who becomes Seth¿s lover. Paul D starts to get frequent encounters with the ghost of Beloved. He used to be one of Sweet Home man, were he suffered horribly and has reacted by shutting away any deep feelings. Paul D eventually leaves Seth after he finds out that Beloved is the ghost of the murdered baby. He seems to have no more trust in Seth. Beloved is talked about almost throughout the whole story. She becomes a problem to the family so she must be exorcised away. Africans had to suffer great consequences for being in slavery and making sacrifices. Slaves had no rights and they were regarded as living animals. They were regarded as property owned by another person. Such consequences were not to ever look behind your back again for a black person. Once a slave would enter the ship to get taken to another country, the life of the man or the women was over. With consequences came great sacrifices that Africans had to make. Whether it was an attempt to es

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    Read it and Embrace it!

    Toni Morrison¿s Beloved is by far, most intriguing novel that I read in 2006. Any reader should be surprised at depths of story and a powerful message behind Toni Morrison¿s words. For any potential reader, my only but most important advice is, ¿do not skip the introduction part.¿ Because of Toni Morrison¿s Beloved swings and shifts through countless flashback, it is appropriate for reader to get a sense of story through introduction of the novel. Only then, a web of complexities display in Toni Morrison¿s writing become less challenging or perhaps less confusing. I am not a heavy reader, but I can spot a good book when I see one. Beloved is must read. Beloved is a story based on true event following Ms. Margaret Garner, a fugitive slave woman who made unthinkable decision to end her new born baby¿s life. In her novel, Ms. Morrison delicately introduces s unbearable journey of one slave woman in pure and colorful literary words. The story takes place in 18th century, soon after Civil War. A fugitive slave woman named Sethe escapes slavery and end up in Ohio. But Sethe is increasingly consumes by her guilt of killing her own infant. While Sethe is trying to forget her tragic past, however ghostly girl appears at Sethe¿ house called 124. Despite the warning of Paul D who is Sethe¿s love interest, Sethe welcome mysterious girl Beloved in to her house. Sethe¿s only daughter named Denver, quickly become Beloved¿s best friend. But Denver and Her Mother Sethe soon find out that no matter how much sacrifice they endure to please Beloved¿s constant demand for attention, it is not enough for Beloved. Because of Sethe¿s guilt grow day after day just as obsessive Beloved demands for Sethe¿s affection grow. At the end Denver and Denver¿s neighbor come to Sethe¿s rescue. Sethe, at last, comes out of her deeply wounded heart and guilt to face the daylight. And Beloved disappears to the darkness where she belongs. And Paul D promises Sethe that he would never leave her again. Through the journey of one slave woman, through Sethe¿s eyes, Toni Morrison takes her reader to the place where black woman in shackle drag into a field of agony and abuse. By exposing nature of injustice, ignorance, and intolerance, Toni Morrison asks her reader one difficult question to answer. And many answers readers can have. I came up with my own set of the reasons and the answers that are convincing at first, but I abandoned them all. Only reasonable answer to my confusion is to read the book one more time. It is my only reasonable conclusion so far. Perhaps Ms. Morrison¿s intension is for her readers not to make shallow conclusions or for her readers not to toss out her novel just because done reading it. I will read it again and serve Ms.Morrison¿s intension. But I think I owe it to myself. My growing respect for Toni Morrison as a writer serves my intension well too. Ms. Morrison¿s Beloved is one fine example of literacy that breaths. Because of her sincere approaches to the each character as well as story itself, it is hard not to appreciate Toni Morrison¿s writing. Ms. Morrison¿s explosive language in Beloved creates emotions that are extremely real to the reader. And unpredictable shifts following one flashback to another flashback throughout her story demonstrates complexity beyond anyone reaches. But, to me, most intriguing element in Toni Morrison¿s Beloved is her brutally honest expressions in novel. And I found it so rare and so brave. Because the novel Beloved gives its focuses to the slave woman in time period soon after the Civil War, it is truly rare, and privilege to have a chance to observe and at least aware of part of history and women enslavement and the reason enough to open the first chapter of Beloved. Interestingly 18th century in which the story begins its journey, yet the inhumane, injustice, and the consequence of ignorance existed at the time are still exist now. No one wants to admit it but it is true. To broad American audienc

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    A Novel to be Passed on

    If you are looking for a novel which takes readers back to the American slavery era, then the novel Beloved would be your weapon of choice. This novel takes place during the time of slavery in the U.S. It tells the story of a young woman born as a slave and her, along with her family¿s dramatic struggles through post slavery. Toni Morrison¿s national bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winning novel should be read by everyone because of her unique writing style, language usage, and her ability to tell a story of slavery in full perspective. Toni Morrison is an author who differs from others because of her unique writing style. Throughout the novel Morrison uses a lot of brutal descriptions to tell her story. For example, when readers are told the story of Sethe and how her ¿milk was stolen,¿ Morrison leaves out no details thus enhancing the story. ¿After I left you, those boys came in there and took my milk. That¿s what they came in there for. Held me down and took it¿Schoolteacher made one open up my back and when it closed it made a tree. It still grows there.¿ In this particular scene, Morrison displays the harsh treatment upon Sethe, how her breast milk was stolen and how she was brutally beaten with a cowhide. Another example of Morrison¿s good use of description is when readers are told the story of Sethe and her mother. She shows readers what life was like as a slave, how families were rarely ever able to stay together, and how identifying a family member was much more complicated than just the recognition of faces. ¿I didn¿t see her but a few times out in the fields and once when she was working indigo. By the time I woke up in the morning, she was in line¿She didn¿t even sleep in the same cabin most nights I remember. Too far from the line-up, I guess. One thing she did do. She picked me up and carried me behind the smokehouse. Back there she opened up her dress front and lifted her breast and pointed under it. Right on her rib was a circle and a cross burnt right in the skin. She said, `This is your ma¿am. This,¿ and she pointed. `I am the only one got this mark now. The rest dead. If something happens to me and you can¿t tell me by my face, you can know me by this mark.¿¿ Morrison also created the novel to be somewhat confusing to add on to the suspense. Her constant references to the past keep readers guessing. For example, the mysterious character of Beloved is a large part of Morrison¿s novel. Although her character brings up much confusion when she appears in the storyline, she is strongly connected to the family through the past. Her relationship to the family is somewhat hazy though out the novel, but in time, Morrison tells readers who Beloved is in a dramatic and suspenseful manner. Throughout her novel, Morrison gives readers a taste of what it was like to live during slavery. Aside from the brutal beatings, rape, torture, and hard labor, Morrison puts readers ¿in the past¿ by her dialogue usage. She uses her characters to create a more authentic approach to the novel. For example, dialogue between characters like Sethe and Paul D. represent how slaves spoke during those times. One could even say the language usage in Morrison¿s novel is one of a kind it represents an era in which African Americans communicated with each other using only the language of their homeland and broken, southern accented English. For example, a simple line from the novel depicts they way they spoke, ¿I strapped that baby! And you way off the track with that wagon. Her children know who she was even if you don¿t.¿ Nowadays, slavery is something that is rarely discussed in society. Most people go around living their ordinary lives, forgetting about our country¿s history. Slavery is something that can never be forgotten, not only was it the harsh treatment of African Americans but it was a

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    A Beloved Tale

    Zach Cruts The Beloved Tale The story of Beloved was a very heartwarming novel. If you are one of those readers that love 20th century African American Literature, then this book is perfect to read. The foreword to the novel discusses the fascinating life of Margaret Garner and how she tried to kill her children and was arrested for killing one of them. Fugitive Slave laws were a major cause of this because the laws were for the return of escaped slaves. This novel should be read because it is an important piece, however, the novel is confusing and should be read by people who have at least a high school reading level. Three aspects of the story that I thought were very appealing are the representation and race, organization, and the reasoning. Race and slavery played a huge role in 1873 when the novel took place. Freedom played a big part in the slaves live because they felt mistreated and that there was limits on their own personal freedoms. This is why many of the slaves would try to escape to be free individuals. I really thought this book did an excellent job of describing the situations and the impact that freedom had on the slaves. It made me realize that there was a lot of danger in being a runaway slave. Also racism had a huge effect in this story. Sethe, the main character, was a runaway slave who tried to survive without being caught by her owners. The white slave owner Mr. Garner treated the slaves with respect but the slaves still had limits on what they could and couldn¿t do. When Sethe was a slave for schoolteacher he treated her and the rest of the slaves as animals. Schoolteacher told his nephew after he beat Sethe that she wouldn¿t return. He said ¿what would his own horse do if you beat it beyond the point of education¿ (Beloved pg 176). The organization of this novel was very fascinating. There where no chapters in the book and the plot still went right in order. Some chapters were flashbacks of what happened earlier in Sethe¿s life. Other chapters were stories of loved ones and what was going on long ago. The novel skipped around a bit going from past back to the time the characters where living which was 1873. The story was well written and the language was pretty easy to follow. It was easy to comprehend and easy to follow along with what was happening. Morrison started with the history of the safe house I24. It then went to Sethe who was a slave living with her owner Mr. Garner. From here the novel followed the struggle of Sethe trying to earn her freedom instead of her just being born with her own freedom. However, one confusing part for me as a reader was at the end when Denver, Sethe, and Beloved are all talking about Beloved. It was near the end of the book and all three of them showed their own feelings towards each other and what they meant. I really didn¿t know what was going on so I had to reread it a few times just to understand what was going on. Another confusing part was when Beloved came from the water wearing her dress, nice shoes, and jewelry. I interpreted it as her coming from a slave ship out of the water. She might have escaped and swam to get free. The reasoning for the novel is very important. Instead of just a boring documentary about the story of Margaret Garner, Toni Morrison also throws in her opinion of what went on during the times of slavery. Margaret Garner was a runaway slave who was arrested for trying to kill her own children instead of having them go back to slavery. The reasoning for this novel is to inform the readers of what went on during the time of slavery and what feelings that all of the slaves felt. Morrison put the history of slavery into a story and not just a documentary of what had happen during the 1800¿s. The novel wasn¿t strictly factual it had views of what Morrison believed had happened. The story showed the struggling runaway slaves trying to survive in society without being caught by their owners that were probably out looking for all

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    a mothers sacrifice

    I must admit I haven¿t read many books in my lifetime, but if most books are written with as much excitement and suspense and Toni Morrison¿s Beloved, book reading is my new hobby. From the structure of the novel, the representation and race, and to the story itself, Beloved is a very unique story. Beloved has a great plot, and the characters is what makes the story what it is. The structure of the novel is quite confusing at first. Once reading the story, it is difficult to realize if the narrator change scenes or settings. Though at the end of the scene, you will realize that you were back to the original scene. At first you will be confused, but you will put everything together. The flashbacks in the novel really make you realize what the characters are dealing with and why the story is the way it is. The story is a remarkable story. It is about a woman, Sethe, going threw the hardships with her family threw the time of slavery. Besides the hardships faced threw the tragic life of slavery, Sethe also has to deal with the death of her children. She comes to a tragic moment in her life when she has to make a serious decision. She had to choose between letting her children go into slavery, or take their life to save them from a life of torture and hardships. After choosing to take her child¿s life, she was looked down upon by the African-American community. Then later after her child¿s death, as it might seem a little farfetched, the house that Sethe is living is haunted by her dead child. It is quite weird, but from the story, it isn¿t to crazy. Sethe was an ex-slave who was abandoned by who birth parents. Sethe was the mother of four, Buglar, Howard, Beloved, and Denver. She tried to kill all of her children just to keep them out of slavery, though she only succeeded in only killing the oldest daughter. Now she at 124 Bluestone road. Sethe had lived a rough and painful life, but it was soon to get even more extreme when her dead daughter would return in another human beings body. Beloved is the reincarnation of Sethe¿s deceased daughter. Before being reincarnated into another¿s body, Beloveds spirits continues to terrorize 124 Bluestone road. This continues until Paul D comes and chases her spirit out of the house. After being chased out of the house, Beloved returns reincarnated into another woman¿s body. At first, many didn¿t believe it was her, but she quickly gains Sethe¿s trust. Paul D was a surviving slave from on of the plantations. Paul D wanted to be with Sethe at the plantation, although she chose to be with another man. After escaping slavery, he headed toward 124 Bluestone. He finally got the woman he always wanted, Sethe. She really loved him, until he told her that Beloved wasn¿t good for her, so little by little, Sethe was pushing him away. The main theme of Morrison¿s Beloved is showing slavery from an African-American families point of view. Usually, slavery is told from a white mans view, which is slightly skewed in a way. They only show what they want to show. In the past, a few slaves knew how to read or write, so their aren¿t a lot of records of slavery life. In Beloved, it displays an ex-slaves struggle to deal with their past to proceed with their future. It is quite tragic, but it is an attention grabber. You will feel the pain that this African-American family went through. From the death of a sibling, to the return of that sibling coming back to haunt them. The representation of the life of ex-slaves is very hard to read about. After reading this novel, you will wonder what being a slave would be like. As an ex-slave, Sethe still had to worry about the white man coming after her to bring her back to slavery. For a mother to kill her children just so they wouldn¿t have to go into slavery is crazy. Knowing what slavery was really like is hard to deal with. It is very idiotic how a human beings color will determine if you were going to be a slave. Th

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2006

    Fun To Read

    I have read this book for a book report at school (6th grade) and it was ok I recommend it to people who love reading like I do and have time!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2006

    .

    This book changed my life. It made me fall in love with literature - and with words.

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