Customer Reviews for

Beyond Bullet Points: Using Microsoft PowerPoint to Create Presentations that Inform, Motivate, and Inspire

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted September 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Become another Steve Jobs

    Many of us make presentations or attend presentations as part of our work. How many of us can claim to have made a presentation which wowed the audience? Or for that matter, come away from a presentation with the feeling that your day was made? I would argue, very few. Which is the reason why, a book like Beyond Bullet Points 3rd Edition by Cliff Atkinson (Microsoft Press; 352 pages) is a necessary read.

    The fact that the book is in its 3rd edition, by itself indicates the popularity of the book and the author. To top it up, when the back cover mentions how a lawyer who used the book won a verdict of USD 253 million, it does make one take notice.

    The author uses Microsoft Powerpoint as the tool to explain how to create not good, but great presentations. Now presentations are not as much to do with the tool, as with having a systematic approach towards the topic. The author explains how to plan the presentation and then put it into the tool. He believes the first five slides are the key to the success of the presentation. He also explains the need for storyboard and narration, and how pictures are worth the thousand words.

    The book is quite detailed and is not a leisure read. It is best used as reference to hone up ones presentation skills. It could be also be used in trainings on giving effective presentations. The author's experience shows up in his writing and makes it go beyond theory. Not all of us can be Steve Jobs. We can at least attempt to make our presentations go beyond bullet points.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2007

    A reviewer

    Required reading by a professor at my university, I would not have ever picke dup this book just by the title. I have used powerpoint and created powerpoint presentations many times before and believe my technique is still better. I somewhat enjoyed using the template but found it long and strenuous to do. Powerpoint presentations should be used as talking points and not as reading material. Atkinson does a good job stating his point but it does not make for an enjoyable read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2007

    If you already know what you want to say...

    Very little about Powerpont, this book spends it's ink on how to plan a presentation. If you're looking for a reference on Powerpoint, this is not it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2007

    Presentations that work

    Beyond Bullet Points is not an advertisement for PowerPoint and Atkinson is not a Microsoft shill. In fact, Atkinson's approach is based on nearly 20 years of sound research, mostly from Richard Mayer, a psychology professor at UC Santa Barbara. And if you need another authority, how about Aristotle? Beyond Bullet Points is built on the fact that nearly all people have become bored by PowerPoint. It has been misused and the result is ineffective presentations. Atkinson shows how presenters need to tell a story to their audience. His approach uses the basic story elements of Hollywood movie making, which can be traced back to Aristotle. He explains how writers need to employ ethos, pathos, and logos to make a connection with an audience. I use this book in the courses I teach in the College of Education at Towson University. My students tell me that they are bored by PowerPoint. When they learn to use this approach, they become excited by what they can do. This is not a PowerPoint how-to book. Yet, it uses a clear, step-by-step approach to building a complete presentation. Atkinson offers free storyboard templates to follow the BBP approach. Anyone with basic PC skills can benefit from this book. Beyond Bullet Points shows us how we can use PowerPoint more effectively according to the proven principles of multimedia learning. This book is for everyone who wants their message to be received, not just tolerated. For those who want to read the research behind the book, there is an appendix that explains the principles of multimedia learning.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2006

    Beware the One Size Fits All Approach

    If you use presentation software on occasion, the book is worth a look. Keep one huge caveat in mind as you read: The book is published by Microsoft Press. Microsoft, of course, makes PowerPoint. Think they might have a motive for trying to stem the anti-PowerPoint tide that is sweeping boardrooms and speaking venues worldwide? As for the book's content, Atkinson's use of a storyboard concept for organizing slides provides an interesting structure to a presentation. Is it right for every occasion? Of course not. And that is where the author's recommendations start to lose credibility. No single approach works every time. Each audience is unique and deserves its own material. The overarching fault in this book is that Atkinson has his default set on using PowerPoint every time. While this is hardly surprising given Microsoft's involvement, it is a dangerous assumption for any speaker. Perhaps slides make sense in a given case, but perhaps not. You need to ask yourself during your preparation phase whether your audience would be best served by your use of a full text speech, an outline, extemporaneous remarks, or, yes, PowerPoint. You should also consider what format best plays to your strengths. If technology tends to frustrate you, you are better off avoiding slides. Atkinson's loyalty to Microsoft's presentation software is so strong he even suggests using slides when you only have five minutes to make your presentation. There is one word for this: Overkill. What's next, loading your 30-second elevator speech onto a PowerPoint presentation you can run on your PDA when attending networking events? In short, if slides make sense for you in a given situation (a big if, in most cases), Atkinson's design tips can prove useful. Just be careful to ask yourself that bottom line question first: Are you using the right medium to reach your audience?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1