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Beyond Civilization: Humanity's Next Great Adventure

Average Rating 4
( 25 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2000

    Handbook For Revolution

    This is the handbook for the new revolution. The new tribal revolution. Daniel Quinn has answered everyone's question, 'but what can I do?' The answers are here.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2001

    This book - and Ishmael - will change the world. It changed me.

    I never used to be *that* concerned about the condition of the Earth and our civilization; I knew we had some great problems, but I figured they would be solved sooner or later and that humanity was in no real threat of going extinct. My God, what a naive view that was. Reading the Ishmael trilogy and Beyond Civilization has totally changed me. I used to be more or less apathetic about these issues, but after reading these books, I absolutely couldn't stay that way. We are in real trouble if we continue this way of life, and nothing less than a world with changed minds will save us. Everyone has to read Quinn's books, including this one. I'm not exaggerating when I say that. We all have to change our vision from the current one, or we'll end up stabbing ourselves to death (that's what we're doing now). Quinn makes these important facts very clear in this book, and his reasoning is so sound. These ideas were totally unknown to me before reading Ishmael. Now I can't believe how I got along without them. I know so many people who feel the same way after reading Quinn's books. They say their lives are changed. Some of these people were the most apathetic I knew towards environmental issues. It's *amazing* what effect these books have on people. I've never experienced anything like it. More than anything, this book is a tremendous inspiration, especially to those who have read Ishmael (they can appreciate the ideas more - so you read Ishmael too! :). It's straightforward, clear, and incredibly powerful. Please read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2001

    the manual for change

    this book is a great companion to quinn's other works ( ishmael, my ishmael, the story of b ) ... i keep this book in my bathroom and read passages in it daily, finding new insights every time i turn a page ... its the new bible peace

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2001

    Required Reading For The New Rennaisance

    Brilliant book, and it requires more than one reading in order to fully grasp the message. Essentially: the re-tribalization of the modern world. Spears and tipis not required, just a willingness to change from hierarchy to community, right smack dab in the in the middle of this world of skyscrapers and highways. No more running away, folks.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2000

    Bioregional Intentional Communities

    People who dropped out and went back to the land in the 60's and came up with the right balance of adults to children (about 5/1), practicing permaculture, growing their food organically, midwifing their babies at home, homeschooling, making decisions using concensus process, resolving conflicts using the tool of Re-evaluation Counseling and living off the grid have been holding continental gatherings bi-annualy since 1984 to celebrate their successes and write the blueprint for the (Post Industrial/Post Scarcity) Ecological Age. Daniel Quinns books serve as the raison d' etre for what is an already established worldwide movement that is overlooked by mainstream culture.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2013

    I have recently picked up Daniel Quinn's work and immediately de

    I have recently picked up Daniel Quinn's work and immediately devoured as much as possible. The way the Author catches your attention seems too easy, ISHMAEL as well as it's sequel  MY ISHMAEL being an easy yet captivating read.  I have this one my list next, and from experience I can say it's going to be just as amazing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2013

    It is no Ishmael but still has its moments

    Making a living in a tribe as the hope for humanity is very appealing, and it is not what you think. Read it and join the conversation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2001

    Honesty

    As a pyschologist-to-be (still going through the years of schooling) the one outstanding theory that has been drilled into me is that in order to heal correctly, you must help your client to be honest with him/her self. That is exactly what D.Q. has done in his books. He has simply been honest in his writings. As a lover of honesty, i loved all of his works.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2001

    required reading for the conscious

    Daniel Quinn once again uses his story-telling talents to relay a challenge to 'takers' (from Ishmael) everywhere. He asks how much we really know about ourselves and the culture we defend so vehemently.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2001

    Inspires to action

    A wonderful new book by Daniel Quinn that inspires us all to action in whatever way we can. Inspiring, thought-provoking, and important essays in bite-size pieces. This book is exciting and positive in it's urging to start creating a sustainable way to live.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2001

    another of Quinn's gifts

    Quinn displays another set of new ideas and writes some more of his thoughts on his old ideas. thank you! thank you! thankyou! Mr. Quinn for giving me and others hope for our future, an hopefully helping to save our lives. The Earth Gods will love you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2001

    5 stars in my book

    Have read all of Daniel Quinn's materials, and have been positively influenced by his writings. Hope to talk many other of my friends and family into getting his books and reading them!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2001

    The Novelty of Self-Restraint

    Quinn¿s writings are tremendously powerful in their ability to explain the evolution of human society, the development of Taker culture and ideology, etc. I believe his prescriptive writings, however (e.g. in Beyond Civilization) suffer from a fundamental flaw: his apparent assumption that Taker Culture can or will exercise self-restraint. Throughout his writings Quinn rightly admonishes us to look to the rest of the Community of Life for guidance on how to live as members of that Community, not overlords of it. Yet nowhere can we find any evidence that any other species has ever ¿Walked Away,¿ as he challenges Takers to now do. ¿Walking Away¿ (at least as I understand it) fundamentally means exercising self-restraint, consciously refraining from exercising available power to ¿convert the biomass of the planet to human biomass¿ as Quinn discusses in his video ¿Food Production and Population Growth.¿ Throughout his writings Quinn contrasts this ¿totalitarian¿ approach to food (agriculture) and life with that of other species and non-Taker cultures, species and cultures more in ¿balance¿ with the Community of Life. Do you seriously believe that this ¿balance¿ is achieved and maintained by their choice, rather than being unwillingly imposed upon them by other members of the Community or other controls (e.g. climate, competitors, soil types, etc.)? That is, do you believe for a minute that the Sioux would not have tried to convert all earth biomass to Sioux biomass if they had the tools to do so? Or that the coyote would not try to convert all earth biomass to coyote biomass if they had the tools to do so? Or the dragonfly? Or the Russian Thistle? Or the fire ant? Can you seriously argue that any other member of the Community of Life would (or has) willingly ¿Walk(ed) Away¿ as Quinn admonishes Takers to do? Nonsense. Give brother coyote the tools to minimize his enemies, enhance his food supplies, reduce his diseases and minimize the impact of adverse climate on him and he will certainly not ¿Walk Away.¿ He will overwhelm us, just as we now (largely) overwhelm him. Consider exotic invasive species around the world, species transplanted from their ¿balanced¿ Communities of Life of their native lands to new Communities of Life far away. These ¿new¿ Communities lack the ¿balancing tools¿ necessary to restrain their growth and expansion, and they expand dramatically at the expense of the rest of the Community, creating monocultures. I see absolutely no willingness of Cheatgrass to ¿Walk Away¿ in the intermountain West of the United States, or of the Cane Toad to do so in Australia, or of the Zebra Mussel to do so in the Great Lakes, or of the Brown Tree Snake to do so in Guam. Each of these species, lacking the ¿balancing tools¿ of its native land that kept it in check, is now rapidly converting its new Community¿s biomass to its own. There is no self-restraint, no ¿Walking Away.¿ When I do as Quinn suggests and look to the rest of Community of Life for guidance, I see absolutely no evidence that any other species has, or would, ¿Walk Away,¿ and Quinn provides no evidence to the contrary. Quinn does suggest that several New World cultures ¿Walked Away¿ (e.g. the Hohokam and the Anasazi), but I have found no anthropologists, archeologists, etc. who agree with him. Instead, they point to necessity (changing climate patterns, attack from other cultures, etc.)--not choice--as the factors driving these cultures away from their early Taker paths. Taker Culture enjoys the dubious distinction of being perhaps the first member of the Community of Life who will need to demonstrate something that is unprecedented in life on earth: the exercise of species self-restraint. I have absolutely no confidence that this will ever be done, and certainly the brief glimpses of life ¿Beyond Civilization¿ Quinn has offered thus far (e.g. the barely coherent, drug-induced ramblings of Michael Time on Quinn's website, the ridiculous, ba

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2001

    Interesting but No Mind Shattering Ideas Like in Ishmael

    Its an ok book, but nothing Daniel Quinn ever writes will top Ishamel, a book that was fresh and mind boggling when it first appeared on the scene! I still say if you want to understand Quinn's ideas, Ishmael is all you have to read. His theories and ideas are amazing but people took it to far, he is just a man with great perception, that doesn't mean he has all the answers. Beyond cicilization is a result of people making Quinn into a 'god' and him finally giving in. Don't rely on others, change your way of making a living to something that makes you happy and doesn't contribute negatively to the world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2000

    Start world change with yourself

    This book, the forth in the series of great enlightening pieces by Daniel Quinn, lays out his contentions about 'taker' society and the repercusions of it's actions. A great quick read for such large concepts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2000

    Useful but not up to its promises

    Honestly, I've been a bit disappointed by the book. The reason why it made this list, however, is that it makes us aware that human beings did not appear as civilization builders. Indeed, civilization was only one of the many experiments that humans tested in order to improve their lives. Quinn shows us that many cultures tried this experiment at one point in their history, but that they all gave it up because they quickly realized that (1) this lifestyle pushed them to work more than ever before, and (2) it favored an uncontrollable growth that put in danger their ecosystem. Quinn's message is that it is time for us to do the same thing: it is now obvious that our civilization does not work well at all, and it is on the verge of being eliminated by natural selection (putting our ecosystem in danger puts us in danger!). Thus, even though our cultural myths implicitly tell us that civilization is the greatest accomplishment of human beings, it is now time to realize it is not true and to walk away. Now the real question is 'How can we walk away?' Do not read this book if you are just looking for easy and quick answers because you will not find them. What Quinn proposes is to (1) become aware of our cultural myths (the purpose of Ishmael), and (2) change them to a more sustainable mythology of the way we live. Thus, by teaching our children and other people around us about the failures of our own culture and the successes of other cultures, we should be able to have a better vision of human life and how human beings can live sustainably within the community of life. Quinn goes on saying that the tribal way has been working for hundreds of thousands of years, as it provides what people really need: A sense of belonging and of purpose. He then gives a few examples of how people, nowadays, could form small groups and start sharing their resources and monitoring their impact on their environment. Their is real hope and a future for the human species beyond civilization. Walk away from it and find your own creative ways to adopt a sustainable lifestyle!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2000

    genius

    Three years ago, when I first picked up Ishmael, I never would have thought that I would be an avid reader or a person who always seeks knowledge. Daniel Quinn has definitly showed what he is all about in this book, I love it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2000

    Thought provoking but redundent

    This is a good book that provokes contemplation of todays society and our social climate. I did however find it to be redundant with the same point being made continuously made throughout the book. I understood what was being expressed in the first few pages of each chapter and felt that the substance of the book was overstretched.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 1999

    The Most Profound Book I've Read

    This book is a veritable tornado of new ideas that are guaranteed to re-wire your mind!!I now know whats been itching me since I was a kid 'growing up'.There is something wrong with our 60hr-a-week-at-the-labor-camp, dispassionate,mall going,tee-vee consuming culture,and after reading this book,I can begin to understand why.If anybody from the Northwest reads this, feel free to contact me at my E-mail address

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
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