Customer Reviews for

The Big Eddy Club: The Stocking Stranglings and Southern Justice

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
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  • Posted May 8, 2013

     The Big Eddy Club is an excellent piece of journalism. It is no

     The Big Eddy Club is an excellent piece of journalism. It is not, however, a serial killer book in the usual sense. Rose isn’t interested in analyzing the crime scenes or probing the mind of the killer. Instead he raises the question of whether Carleton Gary actually is the killer. Rose places the crimes, the hunt for the perpetrator, and the trial of the accused in the context of the place where they happened: Columbus, Georgia. He presents a history of racism in the area going back to the end of the Civil War. He gives accounts of lynching and other violence inflicted on African Americans, acts even more savage than the crimes committed by the stocking strangler, and makes the point that no white person had ever been sentenced for killing a black person in Columbus.
    The Big Eddy Club of the title is a venerable private club for socially prominent folks in Columbus. Many of the strangler’s victims belonged to the club or moved in the same social circles as its members, as did the trial judge, the appeals judges, and the prosecutors involved in Gary’s trial. Rose presents it as a bastion of traditional Southern values and a symbol of institutionalized racism. Only recently the club admitted its first African-American member, one sign that things are finally beginning to change in Columbus.

    Excellent as it is, The Big Eddy Club makes difficult reading – not because the subject is tedious or the book poorly written. Rose recounts so many past and present injustices against African-Americans, piled one upon another and culminating in Gary’s trial, where the prosecution withholds evidence from the defense and lies to the jury, and where the judge is blatantly biased against the defendant and makes no attempt to disguise his feelings or be fair. It was making me furious. When I reached the account of the judge’s refusing the defense any financial resources then booting them from a courthouse office for failing to pay a long-distance phone bill, I put The Big Eddy Club aside. Not until weeks later did I pick it up again and push on to the inevitable conclusion. After years of appeals, new exculpatory evidence, and blatant evidence of prosecutorial wrongdoing, Carlton Gary is still on death row.

    If you’re shocked or baffled by the contempt expressed by many African-Americans for our system of justice, read this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2008

    Interesting

    This is a pretty good book- the result of years of tedious and complex research. Must admit at times I had to skip over portions because there is just too much history that I felt took away from the central storyline. I do feel that the author should have disclosed his connection to the case earlier on. However a good read with some interesting information.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2008

    The Big Eddy Club

    Being from Columbus, the stocking strangling's have always intrigued me. But I feel that this book crossed the line. It did not focus on just the stranglings, it brought to light a lot of things that Columbus and it's inhabitants are trying to move away from and this book has brought it all back to the spotlight. The book focused as much on degrading the city as it did on the actual events of the stocking strangler.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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