Customer Reviews for

Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted December 26, 2008

    Good concept, bad execution.

    This book has a worthy premise of explaining past events from the moment they literally began - with the formation of the universe after the Big Bang. Despite this rather original approach, the book quickly - the first chapter - descends into horribly skewed facts and outright errors. <BR/><BR/>These errors were so gross that I couldn't even continue reading past the first chapter. I will site some of the errors here:<BR/><BR/>1. On p. 8: "The largest stars are up to twenty times more massive than the star that is our sun."<BR/><BR/>Actually, there are many stars that are more than 20 times the mass of the sun, with the largest confirmed to be about 115 solar masses and others suspected of being about 150 solar masses. <BR/><BR/>http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/3308531.html?page=1&c=y<BR/>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080919142646.htm<BR/>http://www.astronomy.com/asy/default.aspx?c=a&id=5620<BR/><BR/>2. On p. 3: "We are traveling 2 million miles a day around the center of the Milky Way galaxy." Then on p. 11: "...traveling about 200,000 miles a day..." <BR/><BR/>The author's numbers aren't even consistent with each other. What's worse is that neither of them are correct. The actual speed is 220 km/s, or about 486,000 miles per hour.<BR/><BR/>http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2007/10/hubbles-secret-.html<BR/>http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2002/StacyLeong.shtml<BR/>http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070929111419AAyoSvx<BR/><BR/>3. On p. 10: "Our black hole, more than six solar masses..."<BR/><BR/>While technically true, this number is far from accurate. In 2002 an article was published by the ESO, which stated that the black hole at the center of the galaxy was about 2.6 million solar masses. While more recent studies show a mass of about 4 million solar masses.<BR/><BR/>Prior to the discovery of the smallest known black hole, XTE J1650-500, earlier this year (which comes in at 3.8 solar masses), the smallest known black hole was GRO J1655-40, which was more than 6 solar masses.<BR/><BR/>http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2002/pr-17-02.html<BR/>http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26529279/<BR/>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080401141549.htm<BR/>http://blackholes.stardate.org/directory/factsheet.php?id=11<BR/><BR/>4. On p. 12: "All other planets revolve on a vertical axis except Saturn, which revolves on a horizontal axis."<BR/><BR/>Considering that Earth's axis is 23.5 degrees off vertical, and Saturn's is 26.7 degrees off vertical, I guess that means Earth also has a horizontal orbit. Or, more likely, the author was actually referring to the 98 degree axis of Uranus, not Saturn. I learned his in elementary school.<BR/><BR/>http://www.nasa.gov/worldbook/uranus_worldbook.html<BR/>http://www.nasa.gov/worldbook/saturn_worldbook.html<BR/><BR/>I understand that scientific data is always changing. However, the figures contained in just the first chapter aren't even close to those used when this book was published. I simply don't see how this book could have been published. It clearly lacks any sort of quality review, specifically from someone with a science/astronomy background. <BR/><BR/>While I didn't read the entire book, I'm left wondering what other inaccuracies are contained in it. Or, perhaps, the first chapter is an anomaly and the rest of the book is accurate. However, considering the fundamental errors in the first chapter, I won't be giving it the chance to redeem itself. There are many other quality books that are more worthy of being read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2007

    First glimpse at the new field of Big History

    Rather well written and kept my attention. While Cynthia Stokes Brown is obviously not a creationist or a believe in intelligent design at least she is not preachy about it. I would by another history book by her.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1