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Black Boy

Average Rating 4
( 186 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(95)

4 Star

(56)

3 Star

(21)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(7)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Truth, Powerful, Revealing

Want to know in depth detail about the life of a typical of an African American boy growing up in the 1920's? Well this is the book for you.

"Black Boy" is an autobiography of author Richard Wright, and his life growing up. Read as he goes in full detail of his h...
Want to know in depth detail about the life of a typical of an African American boy growing up in the 1920's? Well this is the book for you.

"Black Boy" is an autobiography of author Richard Wright, and his life growing up. Read as he goes in full detail of his harsh life at home vs. his everyday life trying to keep up and cope with the society.

Wright reveals the real action that would go on in a typical broken African American home. However, violence was not the only conflict he had to deal with. Because of his family's dedication to Religion, Wright had to assemble that in along with his behaviors-Wright always chose not to.

From stealing to getting a new job every week, Wright makes sure the reader does not want to put the book down. A definitely must read!

posted by Kathy-B on March 24, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Black Boy Book Review

Richard Wright, the author of Black Boy, Born September 4, 1908, on a Rucker's Plantation near Roxie, Mississippi. Richard was a son to Nathan and Ella Wright and an older brother to Alan. Both Richard and Alan raised by their mother, who struggled to put food on the ta...
Richard Wright, the author of Black Boy, Born September 4, 1908, on a Rucker's Plantation near Roxie, Mississippi. Richard was a son to Nathan and Ella Wright and an older brother to Alan. Both Richard and Alan raised by their mother, who struggled to put food on the table and pay bill's after the disappearance of their father. After Richard's mother became very ill they were forced to move, in order to receive help from other family members. Shortly later Richard had to find work to help support his family. After finding work Richard runs into a problem of racism and tries to separate himself from most other blacks by educating himself though reading lots of books and magazines.
Richard, my favorite character, and I have a few things in common. We both didn't really have much to eat growing up and were forced to find work at a young age to help support the family, meanwhile trying to educate and better ourselves though school and reading books. There are a lot of things Richard does as a child that a lot of people could relate to. For example, Richard almost burned down his mother and father's house by being curios about what would happen if he lit the bottom of some curtains on fire. His almost getting into fights also became a frequent occurrence.
There are a lot of really great stories in the book, but the one part that stands out for me is when Richard moves to Chicago trying to escape racism. Shortly after arriving in Chicago Richard needs to find a place to stay. While looking for a place he meets this really nice lady that offers him a room and some hot meals. After talking with this lady for a while, she realizes that Richard is a good person and introduces him to her daughter. They begin to talk about how the daughter wants to get married and that Richard would be a good man for her. Thinking it was a joke Richard continued with living in their home. One morning the daughter came to Richard and tried to seduce him. When he denied the girl got mad and stormed out the room. At this point Richard realized that the family was really crazy and decided that it would be best to move again. Overall the novel Black Boy is a great story. To me the story gets really boring towards the end of part 2 because of all the political and communist talk. If I were to change one thing in the novel, I would talk about his brother a little more and what life experience's he had though this time.
Black Boy is a great novel that touches the hearts of many people. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to read the struggle of blacks and the work they had to put up with in order to survive during this time.

posted by HelixAdult on March 6, 2009

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  • Posted March 24, 2010

    Truth, Powerful, Revealing

    Want to know in depth detail about the life of a typical of an African American boy growing up in the 1920's? Well this is the book for you.

    "Black Boy" is an autobiography of author Richard Wright, and his life growing up. Read as he goes in full detail of his harsh life at home vs. his everyday life trying to keep up and cope with the society.

    Wright reveals the real action that would go on in a typical broken African American home. However, violence was not the only conflict he had to deal with. Because of his family's dedication to Religion, Wright had to assemble that in along with his behaviors-Wright always chose not to.

    From stealing to getting a new job every week, Wright makes sure the reader does not want to put the book down. A definitely must read!

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 25, 2010

    Truly enlightening "black boy" autobiography

    In America today, it would be insulting to say, "Hey you, black boy!" to call an African-American child. So when I first read the title of this book, I knew it was going to be about racism. And one of the book's main theme turned out to be about it.

    I read this book because it was my school requirement, and before I read it, I thought to myself, 'Ehh, just another book about racism.' Interestingly, this autobiography opened up my mind, changing my view drastically about the life of African-Americans during early 1900s. Before reading the book, I thought only rights, like voting, were denied to African-Americans. However, it was waaaaaaay more than that. Not only the rights were denied, the majority of white in America impacted African-Americans psychologically, discouraging them from rising up in status. Through out this book, the main character struggles through the segregated America to achieve what other few African-American tried during this period, equality. The author's diction is easier than I thought it would've been, and sometimes I stayed up till midnight reading this because it was simply attracting. I strongly recommend reading this autobiography to the young generation.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 9, 2012

    A boy can only go through so much. Or can he? Black B

    A boy can only go through so much. Or can he? Black Boy is a compelling autobiography describing all the struggles and hardships of Richard Wright’s life. Richard deals with many issues (which are the main themes of the book) including racism, religious beliefs, choosing between right and wrong, and trust issues.

    From an early age Richard has struggled. At a young age, Wright set his house on fire, his father left his family helpless, and he and his brother were forced into an orphanage because their mother could no longer provide for them. This sets up his life of fighting to find enough money to support himself and all of his family- in a world full of racism. Richard has a passion for writing and reading-will it break him or make him? Richard must learn to deal with this chaos he calls life, but he trusts no one and will take help from nobody.
    I really enjoyed the autobiography Black Boy, but I thought it got slower towards the end. I would highly recommend this book to high schoolers, because it provides detailed insight into Richard’s life, and gives a clear understanding of his hardships including racism. It includes clear and crisp stories of his life, with very vivid imagery. The book will certainly keep them on their toes and keep them reading- what will happen to Richard next?

    I loved the fact that so many major events were packed into the book, but that minor events were also included to support overall ideas and provide further explanation into the significance of each event. Imagery was present in every page, and it felt as if you were living through the book with Richard himself, partaking in his journey. I found myself clinging to each word, undecidedly feeling that I did like Richard, then a couple pages later thinking about how I despised him. In the end, I liked him, and that maybe I just didn’t like some of his choices. Either way, there is certainly enough to read and understand about his life.

    However, I felt the book didn’t provide enough detail about some of the other characters (yes, I know, it was an autobiography, but still) such as Richard’s father, mother, and brother and at times felt confused when other family members were mentioned (aunts and uncles). Also, mentions of certain jobs felt unimportant and unnecessary, as they were briefly mentioned, and soon replaced by another job. Some parts got very religious as well, just as a forewarning.

    My overall rating of this book would be probably an 8.5/10. Like previously mentioned, it was a very good book that kept me reading and turning the page, but had a few issues that were quite bothersome (that is my own opinion). If you like this book, I would suggest checking out a few of Richard Wright’s other book such as Eight Men: Short Stories or Uncle Tom’s Children. Certainly consider reading Black Boy, I doubt you’ll regret it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2012

    Excellent read

    I first read this as a young, impressionable black teenager. I thought this spoke to me in a way that was unimaginable. Cannot recommend this high enough.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2010

    March 25, 2010 This Black Boy is Not the Typical Stereotype

    When I got the list of books that I had to read for my upcoming school year Black Boy By Richard Wright was not one of the books that stuck out to me. When it came time in the year to start reading it I fell in love with this story of an astounding mans life. From the very first page you feel sympathetic for Richard and his younger brother, Alan. Immediately you see how their parents raise them with a strong fist. As Richard grows up he is forced to deal with harsh parents, grandparents, teachers and white bosses but that never discourages him. His will power to keep moving forward and learning is truly inspirational. Richard Wright writes in a non-exaggerated way that clearly shows the harassment and persecution this man had to endure his whole life. His describes his situation with the perfect amount of detail so you are aware of his surroundings but it is not overbearing. It forces you to go through an emotional rollercoaster that I would ride any day!
    For all you people who thinks this book would not apply to you, you could not be more wrong. I am a privileged white girl with caring parents and teachers and friend always there to help but I was still able to find more similarities to Richard than most would expect. During his childhood he struggled with fitting in when he changed from school to school, that is an emotion that anyone would feel. If they were going to a new school, job, or even a party. At his job he encounters abnormal coworkers, which any person can relate to. I guarantee that any person could pick up this book and find a least one commonality with their life. That is a huge reason it is such a great read! It also gives great topic discussions so it's perfect for a class, book club or simply bonding with a friend. Once you pick up this book you will not be able to put it down

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    An okay book

    Black Boy was interesting, but it seemed to me that Richard would keep going backwards even when it appeared he was moving forward. For this reason the plot, to me, seemed to be very repetitive but with different characters. It was fun noticing the differences between Richard the character and Wright the author, I wouldn't really recommend this book but I'm sure there's plenty of other people that would.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Black Boy Book Review

    Richard Wright, the author of Black Boy, Born September 4, 1908, on a Rucker's Plantation near Roxie, Mississippi. Richard was a son to Nathan and Ella Wright and an older brother to Alan. Both Richard and Alan raised by their mother, who struggled to put food on the table and pay bill's after the disappearance of their father. After Richard's mother became very ill they were forced to move, in order to receive help from other family members. Shortly later Richard had to find work to help support his family. After finding work Richard runs into a problem of racism and tries to separate himself from most other blacks by educating himself though reading lots of books and magazines.
    Richard, my favorite character, and I have a few things in common. We both didn't really have much to eat growing up and were forced to find work at a young age to help support the family, meanwhile trying to educate and better ourselves though school and reading books. There are a lot of things Richard does as a child that a lot of people could relate to. For example, Richard almost burned down his mother and father's house by being curios about what would happen if he lit the bottom of some curtains on fire. His almost getting into fights also became a frequent occurrence.
    There are a lot of really great stories in the book, but the one part that stands out for me is when Richard moves to Chicago trying to escape racism. Shortly after arriving in Chicago Richard needs to find a place to stay. While looking for a place he meets this really nice lady that offers him a room and some hot meals. After talking with this lady for a while, she realizes that Richard is a good person and introduces him to her daughter. They begin to talk about how the daughter wants to get married and that Richard would be a good man for her. Thinking it was a joke Richard continued with living in their home. One morning the daughter came to Richard and tried to seduce him. When he denied the girl got mad and stormed out the room. At this point Richard realized that the family was really crazy and decided that it would be best to move again. Overall the novel Black Boy is a great story. To me the story gets really boring towards the end of part 2 because of all the political and communist talk. If I were to change one thing in the novel, I would talk about his brother a little more and what life experience's he had though this time.
    Black Boy is a great novel that touches the hearts of many people. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to read the struggle of blacks and the work they had to put up with in order to survive during this time.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 7, 2012

    The Black Boy by Richard Wright is a powerful autobiography of R

    The Black Boy by Richard Wright is a powerful autobiography of Richard’s young life. He faces long and challenging areas in his life in the south with the Jim Crow Laws. Richard is the narrator of the entire book relating to his life as a young child. The perspective is from a small child’s point of view growing up in the world as a black boy. During this story Richard starts off living with his mother, grandmother and brother in a small house. The house is then caught on fire by Richard forcing the family to move to Jackson. While in Jackson Richard’s mom got ill and was near death. In the beginning Richard was not aware of much that was going on in the world around him and had not realized that there was a problem with racial problems between the blacks and the whites. In the book Richard began to selling papers not realizing what the papers had inside of them. The text explains how a black man showed what he had been selling in this quote, “Well, the paper you’re selling preaches the Ku Klux Klan doctrines,” (131). Richard, as a young boy had not yet realized that he had been working for the white’s against the blacks. Richard only knew small parts of what had been going on, and that was that white’s particularly did not care for the blacks unless for work. Richard’s family was never happy with him and his beliefs. Because of that he was always being beaten by his family. In the text he explains how his Uncle Tom was very angry with him trying to beat him, “This day I’m going to give you a whipping some ought to have given you long ago,” (157). Richard grew up in a very unsupportive household. Throughout the years Richard lands a few part time jobs trying to make enough money to make it on his own. By the time graduation comes along he stole money making his way to the north. Richard was horrified with his crime, but he had to do it to make his life better. Richard makes it to Memphis where he started his life. His life does not change much, but leads him to a better life. In the end Richard realizes that he still wants to be a writer and flees to Chicago making his life better.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A Fascinating Read!

    Black Boy is an autobiography about African-American writer Richard Wright's life in the early 1900's.

    What I personally liked about this book was Wright's writing style. It's clear, but descriptive. I could understand the message in the text the first time I read it. Wright's words transport you into another world, while perceptively displaying his emotions.

    I also loved the character Richard Wright himself. He is probably the most human character I have ever read before. Even when he is off killing small animals, you find your self sympathizing with him. His character is continually fascinating and honest.Black Boy is a very good read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 10, 2009

    This is a book to have..

    Richard Wright can never dissapoint. This non-fiction novel is even better than Native Son even though it does not have such a thrilling story line. The way he writes captivates the reader in a way that one will not want to put the book down. Learning about the past in his perspective is enthralling and amusing to read about.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2014

    Lend

    Can someone plz lend this to me

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2014

    Fascinating and horrifying look at racial prejudice in the 1920`

    Fascinating and horrifying look at racial prejudice in the 1920`s south told through the eyes of an unlikely eyewitness - a self-educated black intellectual. Wright`s stark depiction of the sordid and cruel worlds of both blacks and whites make riveting reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    Bloodfang

    Blood. I-I would really like to be your alpha female. Please.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    To black from evening

    Can i join your pack?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    Black

    You can join.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

    The vl The Black Boy

    This is a very good book i hope u enjoy it. Becuase my group enjoyed alot

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2013

    Is richard black ?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2013

    WARNING: DON'T TAP

    OH MY GOD! WHY THE H*** WOULD YOU TAP? YOU ARE A DISOBEDIANT CHILD. JUST GO TO THE F***ING CORNER AND STAY THERE

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    Lend me?

    Could anyone lend it to me?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2013

    In class you have learned about the slavery and racial remarks

    In class you have learned about the slavery and racial remarks during the Civil War, but have you ever learned about what
    happened afterwards.  In the extraordinary novel Black Boy by Richard Wright, the author attempts and succeeds in recalling the e
    vents in which his African American family had endured after the Civil War had ended.  In this book Richard is a young boy but ha trouble in school and in church.  
    The majority of the book consists of the life that Richard and his family had to live during the early 1900’s.
     Most of their life consisting of racial slurs and the mistreating of the so called “Blacks.”  I enjoyed this great book because as a young
    African American boy, I enjoy reading about how my ancestors lived, and it reminds me that I am so blessed to live in a time where
     blacks are treated the same as the Whites.  Another reason why I loved this book is because the author does an amazing job of retelling his families obstacles and barriers d
    during their time.  I would recommend this book to anyone who is strongly intrigued by the life of African Americans after the Civil War.
     Preferably anyone who is a teenager or older should be able to handle the contents of this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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