Customer Reviews for

The Bluest Eye

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Frustrating to read other reviews

This is a great piece in American literature. What I'm having a difficult time with is why there are so many young 'adults' complaining about the violent/graphic nature of the book. It amazes me that a fantastic, socially concious piece of literature, is considered to ...
This is a great piece in American literature. What I'm having a difficult time with is why there are so many young 'adults' complaining about the violent/graphic nature of the book. It amazes me that a fantastic, socially concious piece of literature, is considered to be offensive for being sexually graphic, especially when our culture is saturated with sex and violence. What bothers me, even more than critically unjustifiable opinions, is that teens are completely caught off guard by sexual and violent material that doesnt contain slap-stick humor and apple pies. This book may be 'graphic', but it isnt gratuitous. If you're focusing so much on the 'graphic' content, you've completely missed the point that Morrison was trying to make.

posted by Anonymous on September 9, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

If you enjoy a very sad and depressing pictorial novel, you will enjoy this book.

I must say I did not enjoy this book at all. Hard to follow at times, very depressing, and a very sad ending- I kept hoping that somehow, and, in some way, this little girl would come away a success- (I was "rooting" for her through-out the entire novel)- Perhaps, with ...
I must say I did not enjoy this book at all. Hard to follow at times, very depressing, and a very sad ending- I kept hoping that somehow, and, in some way, this little girl would come away a success- (I was "rooting" for her through-out the entire novel)- Perhaps, with the aid of a mentor, an education, a miracle, or, better yet, all three! Poor little girl-A life worth living in return for all that she had to go through, was what I was hoping for- Unfortunately, this novel never gave her a chance- In addition, this novel is filled with verbal pictorials and jumps from one character development or background to another- definitely, not straight forward- the story goes on and on and does not get to the point- Saddest part of it all, it is a copulation of various and varying vignettes depict yet another depressing episode of this little girl's life and family- If this is the type of books you may enjoy, by all means read on- I walked away after reading this novel asking myself what on earth did I get from reading such a bleak and dark account? Deep sadness! I leave it up to you to make this choice for yourself- This was a book club selection, which I will think twice before returning-

posted by marielenna on November 22, 2010

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  • Posted November 2, 2010

    The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    The book, the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison tells the story of a African American girl named Pecola. Pecola is a special person, she is described as ugly. Her family is poor and her skin color is black. She warships the blue eyed girls of the world. Thinking that they are the true meaning of beauty. She believes that if she had blue eyes people would call her pretty, people would like her, and she would be accepted. Her home life is very tragic. With a mother who shows no affection towards her and a child molesting father, she is forced to keep to herself and has no friends. Even before the raping by her father she is an outcast, unaccepted and unliked by all of the school children. Even the parents, they believe she is a disgrace. Unable to walk around her house with the fear that her father will pounce on her yet again. After being raped by her father she becomes pregnant but the baby dies within a few weeks. Pecola finds herself sitting inside of her room all by herself, her friend is her mirror. Which is the only person who believes she has blue eyes. The only person to compliment her, the only person to give her a new feeling of happiness and acceptance. But this person is herself, and is gone each time she blinks her eye.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2012

    Disturbing

    The varying perspectives were interesting; although, reading from the point of view of a child molester was disturbing. I am not sure why this frequently appears on high school reading lists, for it is a mature read. If a reader enjoys this novel, I suggest the powerful Beloved: reading it haunted me for a long time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    Okay

    This was a tough read. It was my first book to read on the nook. I wanted to read this book because of the author's status, but was not what I expected. I wonder if it was difficult to read because it was on the nook and I could not flip back the pages to re read as easily as a regular book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Bluest Eye; Summer Reading Review

    Nine-year-old Claudia and ten-year-old Frieda MacTeer live in Ohio with their hard working parents. Like most families during the time of the Great Depression, the girls' parents are struggling making ends meet. A young girl named Pecola is taken in by the MacTeer family because her father tried to burn down her house and he is sexually abusive. The more Claudia and Frieda spend time with Pecola, the more they begin to realize that she is obsessed with what society thinks of her, and deeply wishes that she had blue eyes like Shirley Temple. Pecola moves back in with her family, only to face mistreatment not only by her parents, but by children at school and adults in her neighborhood. Pecola's obsession with whiteness worsens, causing her to go insane and actually believe that she has the bluest eyes in the world.
    Claudia MacTeer is the narrator during certain parts of the novel. She does not care about judgment made about her because of her skin color. Claudia is a stubborn girl and rarely follows rules set in place by adults because she doesn't believe that adults should have control of children. Her sister Frieda is the opposite and is concerned about what other people think about her race. Frieda is aware of the realities of the society. Pecola Breedlove has low self-esteem and a lot of self-hatred built up inside her. Pecola is always thinking about being someone else, showing clearly that she wishes she could change who she was. Pecola's father, Cholly Breedlove, is obviously an awful person for the things he did to his daughter. He is completely self-absorbed and inflicts a lot of heartache on people he's close to constantly. Cholly is vulnerable because of his childhood. We ultimately learn that he has been through a lot of suffering himself.
    "It had occurred to Pecola some time ago that if her eyes, those eyes that held the pictures, and knew the sights-if those eyes of hers were different, that is to say, beautiful, she herself would be different." This quote is said by Claudia MacTeer, in chapter three of the "Autumn" section in the novel.
    I chose these lines because they express what the novel is mainly about. Claudia explains Pecola's struggle with self confidence. This quote shows Pecola's obsession with blue eyes, and how much she hates being herself. When Claudia says "those eyes that held the pictures and knew the sights", it really emphasizes that Pecola wishes her eyes, the parts of her that allow her to see the world around her, were different.
    I do not agree that people should feel less about themselves just because of the color of their skin or the color of their eyes. I like the way Tori Morrison wrote the book because she put the characters through strenuous situations, but made them all learn from them. Some people in the world can relate to the struggles, but thankfully I personally cannot. People have to deal with the hardships on a daily basis, making Morrison's novel come to life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2014

    September 2014

    Book came highly recommended. It was a sad , interesting read about being Black and beauty. If you like books like Black Boy and Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry than you will like this book, as well as the time period that it was set in.
    -Sharae M.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    So like i own this book shjould i read it?

    I own this book and i am not sure if i should read it because the book has that tiny print and it us a slow moving book from what i have read. So can i get some advice on this book. Read or no?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2012

    Haunting.. Hauntiing

    This story line was heart breaking and it made me angry at times.dont read if you already have trust isues!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2012

    Hunger games

    It is very interestinh

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  • Posted November 1, 2010

    A Great Novel With A Great Meaning

    The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison emphasizes on how too many harsh aspects have affected the way people get to live their life. The Breedlove family shouldn't be considered a family. Instead, they should be considered as individuals trapped in a house, unhappy, because of what the world viewed each of them as. Mrs. Breedlove, a mother of two children who treated her family like hell. Instead of acknowledging them, she simply over looked them and waited until she could go back to her days of working for her white family. Mr. Breedlove, an overworking drunk who showed his love with violence and sexuality. To him, raping his daughter was not such a big deal and beating his wife came natural to him. Precola Breedlove, a daughter who felt like she was only loved by a few people, her friends. She considered herself ugly and could only feel pretty if God gave her blue eyes. Sam Breedlove, a son who's hardly mentioned, but obviously unhappy with his life. Running away became a key necessity to him, it became his escape route from every family situation. Each member of this family is different and not one of them could find a way to intertwine each other so they could be a real family who actually felt love. Each one of these characters are faced with dramatic situations that are life changing. I think that this book stood out to me in a very special way and I recommend it to any teenager with the right level of maturity. This novel could easily open the eyes to several individuals and make them realize a few important details of life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2007

    The bluest eyes

    It was a good book, but can be hard to understand due to the subject matter and vocabulary used by Toni Morrison. I, personally, did not enjoy the book as much as some others that I have read because I found it, actually, a little hard to follow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2004

    A freshman college student

    Reading this book was wasn't the best experience I've had in reading. Toni Morrison confused me terrribly with her writing style. The book was boring to me in the begining, but as the story progressed it began to capture me. It was an emotional novel as well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2004

    A freshman student

    Reading this book wasn't the best experience I've had in reading. Toni Morrison confused me terribly with her writing style. The book was boring to me in the begining, but as the story progressed it captured me. It was an emotional yet educated novel as well. This book made me realize how blessed I am to have loving parents who always encourage me and are never negative about my appearance as a black woman. Maybe reading it again I'll have a different point of view. This is the first book I've read in over two years.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    Read it a bit too soon

    I read this book when I was 16 as required reading for my English class, and I was shocked. I can soundly say that I should NOT have been reading that book for my HIGH SCHOOL English class. Aside from not being at all impressed with her writing style at the time, I was so naive at the time that I didn't understand the rape/incest aspects of the story and when I did I was really upset about it. Now that I'm 23, I'm willing to try it again, but I would NOT recommend this for high school readers who are just being forced to read it for school without any knowledge of it contents. I was completely blind-sided by the sexual content in the book, and now that I reflect on it, it makes me angry that I wasn't warned in some way. (I remember my teacher making a vague reference to the book being controversial, offering no reason why, mentioning an alternative, and then jumping right into it.) For less mature readers, the rape/incest is just so shocking that I feel it overshadows the important social commentary the book is trying to make. If you're a parent, request that your child read whatever other book is offered as an alternative. Most schools will offer something else when the reading material is controversial and if they don't, it shouldn't be difficult to make that request. I'm not saying this book is filth. This is a powerful and meaningful book, as are many things that are appropriate for adult audiences only. However, just because it is a meaningful book, that does not mean that 15 and 16 year old kids should be reading it. Get it? It would be like showing 'The Godfather' to a nine year old because it's a 'classic movie that everyone should see'. Now, as a good parent, you just wouldn't do that (I hope)! So why would you allow a school to expose your child to something completely inappropriate for their age under the guise of a good book? Now that I am much older, I think I may give it a second chance, because I read that book when I was way too young.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2003

    was i meant to read this book???

    i checked out this book when i was in 9th grade last year. read about halfway through then lost it. i found another copy at the school i go to now and i just lost that and today i have to buy a new one for the school. im starting to think, was i meant to read this book????? i gave it 3 stars because that is halfway and thats as far as i got into the book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2003

    Melissa Jones, reviewer, Feburary 10,2003

    I thought this book was very difficult to follow. I wouldn't recommend it to high schoolers. I liked this book because it takes you to another place where you don't know about and it teaches you about people who lived back in the 1950's and 1960's. Its sexuality was a bit strong and graphic but other than that it was a good book. I was disappointed in some of the sections like she put people in the book that wasn't even connect to any of the characters and the parts really didn't make any sense. She should of stayed with the theme and it would of been a great book. The author did a good job even though I was disappointed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2001

    It was good but not that good

    This book was good, but it was not a page turner. In places it slowed down in others it picked up. I love to read but this book made me watch more tv which I hate to do. Like i said it was good but not that good. If you are interested I suggest get it from a library, like I did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2001

    The Bluest Eye- Left me a little blue

    The Bluest Eye is by one of my favorite writers Toni Morrison and it is the tale of a poor black girl who wants blue eyes so she can be pretty. The novel has beautiful language and Morrison is an excellent writer, however with this story the structure destroys the story significantly. Morrison skips from the girl to talk about other people in her life and you end up not getting a chance to really understand Pecola because of this. I felt the story was great, writing excellent, but structure a little confusing and bad. So I was touched by the story but not moved as much as I should have been.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2000

    Not too Great.

    I was dissapointed by this book. It had really good reviews, but I did not enjoy reading it. It had a weird plot. Nothing really happened until the end of the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2000

    Moving, but boring!

    This story or poem was hard to keep up with. I read it through and I was dispointed with the end, but one part in the book, pages: 81 through 93 , can really hit home with alot of women's life. I have read some of the reviews about this book from other readers and I would not recommend this book for children or teenagers. I have read many of Oprah's recommendations and I do not rate high on my list.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2000

    made me think

    'The Bluest Eye' is clearly a work of art. It is very well written and has an Extremely strong message. However, I did not love it. It was hard to follow at times, trying to figure out which character was narrating. I do believe the message is a powerful one that needs to be heard, but I believe it could have been presented better. I would, however, recommend reading it. It challenges your mind and logic.

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