Customer Reviews for

The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

18 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

For Animal lovers

better understand its past, present and future link to animals and the need to protect animals from humanity. Divided into seven chapters and an appendix, The Bond is an easy well written read. Wayne Pacelle, the head of The Humane Society of The United States, assume...
better understand its past, present and future link to animals and the need to protect animals from humanity. Divided into seven chapters and an appendix, The Bond is an easy well written read. Wayne Pacelle, the head of The Humane Society of The United States, assumes his audience is intelligent and open minded; as besides a biochemical tie, animals have been pets even in ancient societies and some species were domesticated millennia ago; people refused to leave New Orleans knowing Katrina would be devastating because they could not leave family behind (that family were pets). Anecdotal entries enhance Mr. Pacelle's call to arms as he explains the history of man and animal bonds and how to protect species like the California condor from lead poisoning. Perhaps the most interesting chapter is the last as Mr. Pacelle analyzes opponents of animal protection who argue everything from second amendment rights to human needs. There is also a warning not to fall for "altruistic" groups with positive sounding labels asking for help as some of these are animal abusers. Instead the author provides "Fifty Ways to Help Animals" with contact information

posted by harstan on April 4, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

7 Things You Didn't Know about HSUS

7 Things You Didn't Know About HSUS (The Humane Society of the United States) 1. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is a "humane society" in name only, since it doesn't operate a single pet shelter or pet adoption facility anywhere in the United States. HSUS...
7 Things You Didn't Know About HSUS (The Humane Society of the United States) 1. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is a "humane society" in name only, since it doesn't operate a single pet shelter or pet adoption facility anywhere in the United States. HSUS operates sanctuaries for large animals only, not shelters within the commonly accepted definition of shelter. During 2006, HSUS contributed only 4.2 percent of its budget to organizations that operate hands-on dog and cat shelters. In reality, HSUS is a wealthy animal-rights lobbying organization (the largest and richest on earth) that agitates for the same goals as PETA and other radical groups. 2. Beginning on the day of NFL quarterback Michael Vick's2007 dog fighting indictment, HSUS raised money online with the false promise that it would "care for the dogs seized in the Michael Vick case." The New York Times later reported that HSUS wasn't caring for Vick's dogs at all. And HSUS president Wayne Pacelle told the Times that his group recommended that government officials "put down" (that is, kill) the dogs rather than adopt them out to suitable homes. HSUS later quietly altered its Internet fundraising pitch. 3. HSUS's senior management includes a former spokesman for the Animal Liberation Front (ALF), a criminal group designated as "terrorists" by the FBI. HSUS president Wayne Pacelle hired John "J.P." Goodwin in 1997, the same year Goodwin described himself as "spokesperson for the ALF" while he fielded media calls in the wake of an ALF arson attack at a California veal processing plant. In 1997, when asked by reporters for a reaction to an ALF arson fire at a farmer's feed co-op in Utah (which nearly killed a family sleeping on the premises), Goodwin replied, "We're ecstatic." That same year, Goodwin was arrested at a UC Davis protest celebrating the 10-year anniversary of an ALF arson at the university that caused $5 million in damage. And in 1998, Goodwin described himself publicly as a "former member of ALF." 4.HSUS raised a reported $34 million in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, supposedly to help reunite lost pets with their owners. But comparatively little of that money was spent for its intended purpose. Louisiana's Attorney General shuttered his 18-month-long investigation into where most of these millions went, shortly after HSUS announced its plan to contribute $600,000 toward the construction of an animal shelter on the grounds of a state prison. Public disclosures of the disposition of the $34 million in Katrina-related donations add up to less than $7 million. 5. After gathering undercover video footage of improper animal handling at a Chino, CA slaughterhouse during November of 2007, HSUS sat on its video evidence for three months, even refusing to share it with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. HSUS's Dr. Michael Greger testified before Congress that the San Bernardino County (CA) District Attorney's office asked the group "to hold on to the information while they completed their investigation." But the District Attorney's office quickly denied that account, even declaring that HSUS refused to make its undercover spy available to investigators if the USDA were present at those meetings. Ultimately, HSUS chose to release its video footage at a more politically opportune time, as it prepared to launch a livestock-related ballot campaign in California. Meanwhile, meat from the slaughterhouse continued to flow into the U.S. food suppl

posted by etbmfa on September 27, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2011

    cool

    its a good book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    hwy

    This is such a good book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2012

    Read if you love life

    This will help all birds, animals, wildlife lovers. Ensure that there may be no endangered in the future.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2012

    Touched my heart!

    Being a responsible pet parent and grandparent, I was captured by the title. Although I wasn't exactly sure what the story line would be I enjoyed the information shared in this quick read.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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