Customer Reviews for

The Book of the King (Wormling Series #1)

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2014

    It's not entirely original for a recent work of fiction to conta

    It's not entirely original for a recent work of fiction to contain an allegorical tale of the end times, so we're probably not surprised with 
    the arrival of the Wormling series. A Christian series, in fact. I fortunately didn't buy these books, but borrowed them to read 
    and discovered they're quite simply a waste of time.

    Let me explain.

    Most of us are probably familiar with The Lord of the Rings, Chronicles of Narnia, and other classic fantasy based stories. These bringing
    to light some moral points possibly through some biblical analogy. It seems like that may have been the author(s) plan which unfortunately
     got side-tracked as they got caught up in the story they were creating. 

    Yeah, creating. One thing they never tired of was making up new creatures to do their dirty work, namely, to serve the "baddies"
    and hurt the "good guys". Hideous creature after hideous creature romp through the pages. Some are barely described and others ignored
    as you wonder what they look like. A few of the characters on the side of the good fall in this vague place as well, though one is described
    as having the face of a dog and a rat, thick fur (sheep, dog, whatever?), and hooves of a goat---though not in as many words. Come on!
    They seemed afraid to copy characters/creatures most of us would be familiar with and made up their own (that Erol was a
    dwarf/Munchkin/elf/what the heck?! The author(s) apparently made up much of these 5 books as they wrote them and they weren't secure
    in what they were telling. 

    The last book is by far the worst: the writers hinting, maybe warning the reader at the coming atrocities, yet reveling in the telling.
    Okay, I know things are terrible and will be for all evil, especially as written in Revelation, but the disturbing accounts here are appalling.
     "And her blood", says the Dragon, "shall anoint my throne!" Page after page we hear the same gory phrase repeated carelessly till it's
    annoying. 
    Out-of-place modern analogies only contributed to the jumble of confusion. There was even some bathroom humor thrown in,
    more than likely to appeal to greater crowds of readers. Yet people call this 'clean!' Toilet jokes are not clean, folks!!
    This is more than appalling in Christian juvenile fiction and probably just another ploy to sell more of this drivel.
    Chapters are short, only to keep the story moving---and it does, but only on confusing trips seemingly only meant to fill the pages.

    This is not intended to be a comparison review but if you want a true Christian fiction fantasy, read The Door Within trilogy.

    Don't read the Wormling series. And please don't give it to your kids.

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