Customer Reviews for

Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2008

    The Best Book

    The book Bringing Down the House, was a great book written by Ben Mezrich. This is a nonfiction book about a group of students attending MIT. Kevin Lewis is the protagonist of this story. He is introduced to a world of money and lies by his two roommates, Andre Martinez and Jason Fisher. When Martinez and Fisher feel Kevin is ready, they tell him their secret. They and six other students attending MIT are taught how to count cards and how to beat Vegas by Micky Rosa, a former teacher at MIT. Kevin is taught the ways of his fellow counters and soon he becomes obsessed with money and cheating Vegas. The theme of this book is that when you do the wrong thing, even in one place and not another, it will always come get to you. In my opinion, this one of the best books that I have ever read. Ben Mezrich, the author of this book, has written this book very descriptively. When describing how Kevin carries the large amounts of money around to different casinos, Mezrich says, ¿I tried not to think about the new BMW strapped to my back¿ '5'. This shows how descriptive Mezrich is because he describes what each sum of money can be used for. Also, this book is written very intensely. While Martinez is trying to hide from the security guards at Caesars, he is cornered in the bathroom with a huge sum of money. Mezrich writes, ¿A minute later, there was a loud crash, the splintering of wood. Heavy footsteps moved through the suite¿ '197'. This shows how Mezrich writes very intensely, showing all of the action that Kevin, Martinez, Fisher, and their fellow counters encounter. There are two parts that I like. One of them is the part were Kevin takes the test to see if he can become a card counter. He goes to a fake casino and is playing good for his first time counting cards, making almost a thousand dollars when he is pulled away from the game. He is very angry when Martinez tells him, ¿`Sorry Kev¿ There isn¿t any money¿¿ '58'. Another part I liked is when they secretly pass around the count of the deck by using words like ¿tree¿ which means the deck is up one and ¿voting booth¿ which means the deck is up 18. Some issues this book brings up are, the issue of gambling and how people become obsessed with it like Kevin and the issue of cheating and lying to make money. A connection I made was this book to the movie ¿21¿. The movie is based on this book and they include the same concepts including gambling, money, Vegas, and blackjack. This book has affected me by teaching me the consequences of cheating and lying. In all, this book is very intense, showing what it is like to use all of your knowledge of math, to make money in Vegas.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    Bringing Down the House Does Not Disappoint

    Ben Mezrich¿s biography-thriller Bringing Down the House was, simply put, impossible to put down. The intricate, exciting plot, coupled with Ben Mezrich¿s surprisingly capable writing ability, easily makes this book my favorite memoir since the Darfurian bestseller What is the What. Bringing Down the House tells the adventure of Kevin Lewis and five other M.I.T. students who develop a system to beat the casino in blackjack virtually every time. The book¿s theme, which is essentially ¿no matter how insurmountable something may appear, there is always a way to overcome it¿ will likely inspire thousands across the nation. Overall, I found Bringing Down the House to be an astonishingly enjoyable read, and recommend it to anyone interested in a nonfiction thriller. In fact, I was fully engrossed in the novel the entire time I was reading it. However, I found that the ending lacked a major climax. I hesitate to reveal the finish, but there was no ¿final showdown¿ like I expected the tension just gradually wound down until it came to a slow halt. Through the book, I had hoped for Kevin and his team to meet with the casino owners, and drama would ensue. Besides the slightly disappointing ending, I found no problems with Bringing Down the House. Truly, I enjoyed more parts than I can list. Additionally, I found that this book presented a basic moral question: was it ethical to use methods that seriously elevate your chances of winning in blackjack to gain money from casinos? The team reasoned that they technically were not cheating, because they were not altering the outcome of the game. I support them on this, but the casinos complained that their methods were dishonest, and should not be allowed. I actually feel a strong connection between Bringing Down the House and the award-winning movie trilogy Ocean¿s Eleven, Twelve, and Thirteen. Both deal with ¿beating the casinos at their own game¿ using questionable means. However, Kevin Lewis¿s methods were relatively benign, while Danny Oceans, 'the protagonist of the movie series' used criminal techniques, such as weighted dice, and rigged slot machines. However, what astounded me about this book was that I had to continuously stop myself while reading and remind myself that it was a nonfiction work. The plot line was one of the best formed I have ever read. If I were not aware of the genre, I would have undoubtedly presumed it to be a fantastic work of fiction. Five stars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2008

    A reviewer

    No matter what you hear, card counting is perfectly legal. Ben Mezrich, the author of Brining Down the House, tells the story of a group of highly intelligent MIT students who take black jack to the next level. The ultimately powerful novel, tells of how these geniuses use their mathematical ability to beat the game. They engage themselves in a team of greatly educated members who understand the skills of the probability strategies. While living a fantasy life using double identities, this tale explains how these geeks made their dreams come true by using math to make millions. This thrilling story will keep your mind racing while learning the challenges that the main character, Kevin Lewis, and his other team mates face as they manage to outsmart the casinos. Kevin gets sucked into tricky business that can get him in major trouble. Greed plays a major role in this story making this non- fiction novel a fascinating read for everyone. This story is exactly what Vegas does not want to hear. I found many different aspects to Bringing Down the House while reading, none of which I choose to complain about. While turning each page I felt as if I could never ever stop until I figured out what seemed to be actually happening. One part that caught my attention the most was when MIT¿s Blackjack Team first scouted Kevin. They invited him to a meeting where he learned the skills of ¿counting.¿ He then had to be tested and watched at many hidden casinos before they hit Vegas to make it big time. Another intriguing event that I enjoyed was when Kevin became a ¿Big Player¿ making tons of money right off the back. He would carry thousands or even millions of dollars strapped onto his body causing security guards to barge in. The most feared consequence to a counter would be going to the back rooms of the casinos where they take a personal photo. This brought up even more of a conflict in the novel. It put a dramatic change into their lives because the casinos were beginning to catch up with the players. Even though the managers do not get the players involved with the government, the players are still at a huge risk and could lose all of their money. If all of them were executed from the tables, this mathematical idea would end. Additionally, just as any of the world famous baseball players or professional athletes illegally used steroids, these major card players were eventually caught too. In the end, after reading this nonfiction story, I learned how math could be used in any real life event in the most complicated ways. What would it be like to beat the tables for a living?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2008

    A Must-Read Story

    Bringing Down the House, by Ben Mezrich, tells the fascinating true story of formulaic Blackjack strategies that lead a team of MIT students to a millionaire life in Las Vegas. A main theme expressed in the book is, 'When any given thing appears too good to be true, it usually is.' Bringing Down the House is an incredibly captivating story that exhibits the intensities, successes, and failures of a high stake gambling operation. Bringing Down the House is the best book that I have read. Qualities that made the book as well as it are the way the narrator seems to live inside the main character, Kevin. Mezrich does an incredible job of educating the reader while entertaining him/her. For instance, in the book, there are chapters in which Mezrich interviews persons who were involved with the Blackjack breakthrough. Doing so, Mezrich adds another perspective to the story while educating the reader. Although the characters involved with the Blackjack team were not doing anything illegal by counting cards 'card counting was not illegal because it did not alter the outcome of the cards', many moral issues were addressed. Card counting is keeping track of which cards have already been dealt so the player can determine his odds of getting a Blackjack. One of these was whether counting cards was cheating the casinos because in the eyes of a casino, card counters were criminals. While reading the story, I made a connection to life. In the book, the players enjoy a success, and a failure, which is a replica of life. There are obstacles and the characters do their best to overcome them. What I found very interesting was the variations between the players' personalities. Upon being thrown out of a casino, Kevin, who is cautious, says, 'Then we're dinosaurs''204'. Fisher, a more fiery member, retorts, 'We are not *&^%ing dinosaurs''204'. This contrast of emotions leads to conflicts throughout the story. Reading the book made me curious about Vegas security as well as other mathematical and technological devices used for surveillance. This book is unrivaled by any of its genre and needs to be read by all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2008

    Must Read!!!!

    Bringing Down The House by Ben Mezrich, is a must read. It is a nonfiction book about a college student named Kevin Lewis who joined a M.I.T. Blackjack team who won millions in Las Vegas. They used a ¿team play¿ technique that had designated spotters and big players, also known as BP¿s. The spotters will call in the BP¿s when count is high and the BP¿s will bet high. Throughout the book, Kevin and his team travel to different casinos in Las Vegas and throughout the U.S. When they are in Vegas, they win hundreds of thousands of dollars on Saturday, and then party all day on Sunday. They do this on every trip they go on! The main lesson that this book revolves around is when is the right time to quit. When you win a lot of money in Vegas, Casino management people and start be suspicious. You have to know when the time is right to walk away from the casino and take what you have, so you do not loose any more. Kevin learns for himself by the end of the book when it is good to walk away from a casino and when you can stay and still bet high. This book is a must read for anybody who likes page turning books. Is it legal to count cards? Even if you get caught card counting, the casinos can only ¿ask you to leave¿(42). That allows the M.I.T. students to be able to count cards and not have any trouble with the law. However, casinos still are protective about their money and do not let usually let people off easy with big sums of money. So, they sometime interrogate you to see if you count cards. They take you to the basement and ask you questions. Even if they do not physically hurt you, they intimidate you, so you do not come back. Also, the new movie 21 is based right off from this book. Even if you think you have seen the movie and loved it, the book is much better. Even though the same ideas are there, the plot is different as well as the main character¿s names. The best part about this book has to be the first time Kevin is a BP and when he wins. Especially, how crazy he goes when he wins. He is like a little kid in a candy shop with money. Bringing Down the House has everything an intense book needs and has to have from smuggling two hundred thousand dollars through security, to late night partying and gambling in Vegas. Bringing Down the House has it all! To top it off, it is the true story of M.I.T. college geeks!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2008

    Very Good

    An entertaining book, enhanced by the fact that it is non-fiction. Interesting to read about some of the things the MIT players went through.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2007

    Intelligence equals money

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology students and Sin City, two things that normally do not go together are combined in the book, Bringing Down the House. This nonfiction book was written by Ben Mezrich, and was his first foray into the nonfiction genre. Bringing Down the House was published by The Free Press in 2002. The title itself, tells the readers that the characters are trying to beat the house. This 257 page novel is filled to the rim with plans to cheat the Las Vegas casinos out of their money and into the pockets of the M.I.T. students. Blackjack is the name of their game. Imagine gambling millions in Las Vegas one day and then the next day going to school in Boston. This book takes place in Las Vegas and Boston from 1994-1998 and then reverts back to ¿present day¿ to tell how the author gathered the information by interviewing various characters from the book. The people and events of this story are completely real. Mostly, the narrator of the book is Kevin Lewis, a M.I.T. student, with ¿an incredible affinity for numbers¿ '8'. He tells the readers how he became friends with card counters - people who count cards in blackjack to gain an advantage, and who introduced him to the glamorous gambling world. The book starts off with Jason Fisher and Andre Martinez, card-counters who teach Kevin the ¿System¿- a way to count cards with out getting caught. They and others form a M.I.T. Blackjack Team. About every other weekend they go to Las Vegas and earn money, they do not really gamble because statistically they with win, if they just keep counting. The shady Micky Roso first funds the team, but he eventually gets kicked off the team because any casino he goes into will arrest him. Kevin goes through emotional struggles because he must lie to his family about his double life. They would not approve of card counting, even though legally speaking it is not cheating. Kevin and his team are on top of the world earning millions. Then, suddenly they begin to get barred from one casino after another. The team splits up because Kevin disagrees with Fisher and Martinez about the risks of going regularly to Las Vegas. Kevin believes they should slow down. One faithful day, their double lives collide resulting in an unbelievable ending. What the ending is, can only be figured out if you read the book. While reading the book, I was biting my nails and the last few chapters left me at the edge of my seat. The author successfully captured and kept my interest throughout the entire book. The writing was fast paced, powerful, and descriptive. I felt as if I was there, experiencing the same emotions as the characters. Smelling the smoky casinos, being dazzled by the neon lights, and feeling the thrill of being one step ahead of the casinos. The book being nonfiction made a huge impact on me, knowing these events actually happened and the people exist in the real world. I highly recommended Bring Down the House it grabs your attention and does not let go until the end. This story will be loved by anyone that craves excitement, action filled scenes, and believes that intelligence equals money. The main theme of this book is money and how far some are willing to go and get it. This book left me with the impression that all people, events and things have two sides. Almost everyone one has heard the expression: ¿the house always wins¿, however, in this case that is not true. For those of you, who want to know the intricate details of Kevin Lewis¿s double life, how to count cards and the ending of the book, I recommend you read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2008

    A reviewer

    I am amazed by all the positive reviews of this book. Completely shocked actually. With all due respect, many seem rather confused. I agree that the language is colorful and the story is engaging. But the book reads like a movie script in its cliches, lack of depth, fast pace, cheesy lines, and ridiculous dialogue. Mezrich needs to stick to FICTION. Ah, where to begin. This story, as he tells it, is ninety percent fiction! Consider the hotel break in scene. Can anyone actually conceive of hotel security conducting an orchestrated break in of a guest room? That is criminal behavior. Would a Las Vegas hotel really take such a risk? But it must be true because Mezrich says so, right? Here is another example. This book is supposedly Kevin's story. Now consider the vividly described Bahamas attack scene. Are we to believe the Vegas baddies pursued members of the team to a foreign country? And then here's the big problem. Kevin wasn't even there, but he is the source of the story. Of course at the blackjack tables, there was always a seat available when the table count became favorable. And of course splitting 20's in blackjack can be a good strategy. Right. I could not figure out what IRS audits had to do with card counting. I wonder how the IRS felt when they learned Kevin was earning all these winnings under various aliases, with the fake ID's to boot. Furthermore, these MIT students don't seem real bright. They horded high value chips from different casinos. Naturally the casinos would never keep track and notice such a thing. Also why would the whiz kids sneak large quantities of cash through airport security? What was that all about? There are far less risky ways of transporting money from one state to another 'not from one country to another'. Maybe it should have been smarter to rent a humble apartment in Vegas rather than to stay at the hotels they were plundering. Now lets talk about how the story is written. Several chapters are devoted to the author interviewing random people for the book. These people never make another appearance in the book. They do not enter the story at a later time, in anyway. For example, we met the guy at the shooting range, then never saw him again. As a result the book shifts between first and third person and back again several times. How bizarre. Many high school freshman seemed more intelligent than these MIT geniuses. How about these lines: 'I feel like James Bond,' 'You guys are crazy,' 'This was about him, his life, his choices,' 'This is our turf.' As you can see, this is real deep stuff. The back of the book says this is a story 'Vegas doesn't want you to read.' Of course they do. I am surprised Vegas hotels do not sell copies for one dollar each. They would love to have everyone read this book and believe that they have it in them to duplicate these 'real life' 'laugh' results of these spoiled rich kids, and hang out with Kevin Costner and James Caan at the same time. This whole fantasy scenario is the appeal of this book, along with its simplicity, stupidity, and the illusion of easy money.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2008

    The best book ever about Vegas

    I really enjoyed this book and so did my class because I had to do a report about it and I convinced my teacher and 2 other kids to read it.My bro also read it while i was reading it and we had discussions everyday. Very Recommended to all of you out there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2007

    Great Story, mediocre writing

    This was a great story that was very interesting, but it was poorly written. At times the author was confusing when jumping from present day to when the story actually happened. Good read though, like I said the actual story was great.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    I think this book is very compelling although I had a hard time understanding the major conflict and the actual theme of this book. I was wondering if anyone had any clue what they are. E-mail me if possible. Overall I do recommended this book to practically anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2007

    The Bible of Blackjack

    Taking us inside the oftentimes seedy world of card counting and high stakes gambling in Las Vegas, Ben Mezrich has written a gem with his first excursion into non-fiction, Bringing Down the House. No matter who you are or what your personal history in gambling is, this book will exhilarate, enthrall, and captivate you from the start. Mezrich tells the story of Kevin Lewis, an MIT student who lived a double life for nearly five years ¿ one as a respected student and graduate of MIT, the other as a high stakes blackjack player with several aliases and loads of cash at his disposal. It all begins with a relatively innocent weekend in Atlantic City with two friends, and from there Mezrich takes you down a suspenseful path from casino backrooms to IRS audits. One of the best non-fiction books I have ever read, Bringing Down the House will run the gamut of your emotions. Sometimes you will envy the high-flying life a blackjack team as they party like rock stars, get comped front-row seats to the biggest boxing matches, and make a better living than most of us ever will in the job we work now. At other times, however, you will feel like their lives are empty and meaningless, for most of these people make card-counting their life. They see it as what they are supposed to do here on earth. Perhaps dangerously, Kevin Lewis¿s story tells us all that Vegas can be beat. But the question is, at the expense of what? Decide for yourself when you pick up the page- turning true story by Ben Mezrich, Bringing Down the House.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2006

    Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six MIT Students Who Took Vegas for Millions

    As an avid gambler, I was eager to read Bringing Down the House after several friends recommended it. What could be a more intriguing premise than several MIT whiz kids banding together to count cards in team blackjack play, beating the casinos at their own game and making a sweet profit at the same time? Of course, there's always that OTHER side of Vegas, the ugly side where card counters get their arms broken in 'back-room' confrontations, or sometimes disappear altogether. Author Mezrich brings as intriguing a tale to print as I had hoped. Unfortunately, his overdramatic writing style (As Kirkus Reviews rightly pointed out above) mucks up the works at times. Still, it's a compelling story, and wide-eyed prose can't derail it. Feel free to add a star to my rating if you understand the terms 'basic strategy' and 'high T-count,' and subtract a star if you don't gamble or play blackjack.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2006

    A reviewer

    The book, Bringing Down the House, by Ben Mezrich describes the perils of a man named Kevin Lewis, a graduate out of MIT who is asked to join a team of shady gamblers. They were a card counting team who were some of the best in the world. In taking their offer Kevin is put thru numerous trials and battered with tests that the other members attempt to make him fail. Once he becomes part of the team, he discovers a dangerous world of card counting that only few know about. They travel from casino to casino trying to blend in, and not bring attention to themselves. Their plan is to profit from the Vegas casinos. The team gradually becomes apprehensive, constantly looking over their shoulders for that observant eye that follows them around. Their winning begins to draw attention from all different directions. Conspiracy and betrayal throughout the book keeps your attention devoted to the story itself and wanting you to read further on to see what happens. I enjoyed the many passages of action and suspense. I also admired how Kevin and the team used their knowledge and skill so much, that I wanted to be a part of the team. I wasn¿t keen on the team members eventually breaking up and disbanding each other. Kevin was also not able to discuss his situation with anyone including his parents. Whether the team would eventually get caught keeps the reader interested and in anticipation. I would recommend this book to someone who is interested in intrigue and drama and who likes to keep reading, not knowing what is the next turn in the story. Some other recommended works that I would push to read are Busting Vegas and Ugly Americans. Both these books look to be filled with the same enjoyment of Bringing Down The House.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    Lucky or Smart?

    Bringing down the House is getting the heat from many readers. In the book, six MIT students form a blackjack team and hit Vegas for big bucks. The team is made up of six players who travel to Vegas and come up with a system of card counting to make millions. It¿s not just luck on these kids¿ sides, it¿s the brains behind the operations that ensures them hundreds of thousands of dollars each trip. While in Vegas, the students win big, live luxuriously, and get VIP treatment, while also encountering heat from pit bosses, and some other challenges along the way. Bringing down the House is an excellent book that describes the double lifestyles that each of the players lead. The main character Kevin Lewis, struggles with juggling the double lifestyle of the luxurious and money promising Vegas with his stable and secure lifestyle at MIT, ¿Most of his friends were back at school¿taking tests, drinking beer, arguing about the Red Sox. He was in Las Vegas, living the high life on a million dollars of someone else¿s money. Sooner or later it might all come crashing down¿. In Vegas the MIT team takes numerous risks that may get them shuffled into a back room and possibly beaten up. One incident in Vegas came too close for Kevin when he was playing at a table and looked at one of his teammates who was signaling him to get out of the casino, ¿A hand in the hair meant only one thing. Get out. Get moving. Now. Kevin slung the duffel bag over his shoulder and jammed the purple chips into his pockets¿. If you are up to the risks that the MIT team takes, then read Bringing down the House and it will make you want to buy the next plane ticket to Vegas and try their out their strategies. I really thought this book was interesting, suspenseful, and everything that happened made me want to read more. It made me want to learn more about blackjack and try it myself, although I do not know that I would have the guts to take as many risks as the group from MIT did. I would recommend this book to anybody, even people that don¿t know much about gambling or blackjack. I did not know much about blackjack before I started reading this book and it was one of the best books I have ever read. This book, without a doubt, is in my top ten favorites and would earn a 10 rating. Although I have not read Ben Mezrich¿s other book Busting Vegas, I would recommend reading it as well as watching Ocean¿s Eleven. For an excellent and easy read, I would definitely recommend reading Bringing Down the House it will captivate your attention and you will find yourself wanting to read it non-stop. Who knows, maybe one day you¿ll find yourself one a midnight flight down to Vegas, just to see what it¿s really like.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2006

    When Vegas got Beat

    Bringing Down the House is a sophisticated thriller about an exclusive Blackjack Club set up at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the early 1990s. As their skills improved, they decided to test their skills at the tables in Vegas with real money. The story tells of the group¿s failures and successes, and run-ins with the dark side of Vegas. Mezrich tells the story in an interesting way by switching from present day where he talks with people who were indirectly involved with the group¿s system and how they feel about Vegas, to the point of view of the actual members and their play at the tables. Mezrich not only incorporates the whole idea of card counting, odds when playing, and a team play system, but the reader can feel the vibe of Vegas and excitement of how they really do beat the house which descriptions like: ¿Martinez had just bumped up twenty-nine hundred dollars in a single hand. It wasn¿t luck. It wasn¿t gambling. His odds of winning were significantly higher than fifty-fifty¿. What I really liked about the novel was how Mezrich puts the reader in the moment the reader becomes the main character, Kevin, from the minute he steps off the planes, checks-in at luxurious hotels, steps into the bright casino lights, and finally starts playing. I loved how the author emphasized the idea of how these students had to become completely different people once they stepped on the strip with more descriptions like: ¿She was wearing a tight black leather miniskirt and high-heeled shoes¿She brushed her chips with her hand, the enormous diamond on her ring finger flashing brilliantly above the bright red fingernails¿The dealer never would have guessed that in fact Jill Taylor was a tough fledgling corporate consultant at one of the top firms in the county¿. However, a few minor things that I disliked about the story was how certain logistics were left out, such as how Kevin kept his doulbe-life such a secret without any of his associates discovering it or questioning him. If you are the kind of person who likes to feel the setting of the book they are reading, enjoys fast-paced action, and who might be slightly interested in the world of Vegas, then this is definitely the book for you. You do not have to have any prior knowledge of blackjack or card counting, but you will have to be able to keep up with the systems to understand the book. Also, if you will be a tourist in Vegas and think that by reading this book, you will have an edge at the tables, think again. These MIT students made this game their main source of income. It was not a joke. My overall impression of Bringing Down the House was an amazing, simple, yet thrilling tale of a very impressive heist. Its just hard to believe it was all real.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2006

    Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six MIT Students Who Took Vegas for Millions

    As an avid gambler, I was eager to read Bringing Down the House after several friends recommended it. What could be a more intriguing premise than several MIT whiz kids banding together to count cards in team blackjack play, beating the casinos at their own game and making a sweet profit at the same time? Of course, there's always that OTHER side of Vegas, the ugly side where card counters get their arms broken in 'back-room' confrontations, or sometimes disappear altogether. Author Mezrich brings as intriguing a tale to print as I had hoped. Unfortunately, his overdramatic writing style (As Kirkus Reviews rightly pointed out above) mucks up the works at times. Still, it's a compelling story, and wide-eyed prose can't derail it. Feel free to add a star if you understand the terms 'basic strategy' and 'high T-count.' Subtract a star if you don't play blackjack or if you're a Mormon.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2006

    Outstanding!! A must-read for blackjack addicts!

    I was referred to this book during a casual chat while seated at a blackjack table on vacation. I was doing quite well at the time and struck up a conversation with a guy from NY. After two incredible shoes and nearly tripling my chip count the gentleman jokingly asked 'Your didnt go to school at MIT did you?' I gave him sort of an odd look (had no idea why he was asking) and then he told me about this book. I purchased it as soon as i returned home and read it nearly straight through the first night! This book encapsulates all the feelings and emotions that those of us who play the tables live for. There is very little 'fluff' in this book, if any... each page/chapter just makes you want read the next! The book provides a rare look into the underground world of card counting and professional play, as well as the dangers involved with 'mathematically looting' big casinos. My hats off to those kids at MIT, after reading this book i would say that their system was pure poetry... not something that the average joe can learn in a couple weekends! These guys a business... and most of the casinos like banks WARNING: this book will make you want to gamble!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    should be a must read

    a great story for poker pros, once in a while players or anyone just wanting to read a great book. if you loved ocenas 11 you ll love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2006

    Extremely Interesting!!!!!!

    This book makes you keep on readin from chapter to chapter. If you enjoyed Oceans Eleven and Blackjack.....this is the book for you!!!

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