Customer Reviews for

The Broken Teaglass

Average Rating 4
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 18 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted October 28, 2009

    Surprising and quirky make this debut novel a standout

    The Broken Teaglass by Emily Arsenault is a quirky, fascinating mystery. Billy Webb has just started his new position at Samuelson Dictionary Company as a lexicographer when he stumbles across a mysterious citation for a word that references a book called The Broken Teaglass. When he and co-worker Mona discover that no such book exists, they embark on a quest to track down any other references to the nonexistent book to discover who wrote this mysterious story about a long forgotten crime. Arsenault perfectly renders the frustrations of interoffice politics and the tedium of doing the same thing day after day. Mona and Billy bounce in and out of a possible romance, each harboring their own secrets. This thoroughly engrossing novel will keep readers guessing and loving every moment.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Creative use of dictionary creation

    I enjoyed the twists and turns throughout the book because of the mystery involved. The characters also added an interesting aspect to the story in how the main character's personality and life circumstances related to the glass girl in the mystery. All the characters had a particular and distinct flavor to them and as a whole were enjoyable to understand and think about long after the last page of the book was read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Suspenseful, clever and thought-provoking

    I'm not a huge fan of traditional mysteries. I usually have an hour or two to read, then a life to live; or I've been running all day and have an hour to unwind. Many mysteries require me to keep track of multiple details and hidden facts, and I just can't seem to do it. This book pieced together a story across many pages but gave the puzzle pieces overtly. Perhaps I should devote more time to the study of a mystery story, and I know some people take pride in being able to pull out tiny bits of information and find a solution to the mystery- I am not one of them! This story was cohesive and compelling, with a carefully constructed narrative and I could pick up the threads of the story without re-reading lots of earlier pages.

    I also enjoy reading books about jobs like dictionary editing. One uses a dictionary but never stops to think about how it came to be, and how it is updated, and who is involved. Very interesting.

    Finally, it was refreshing to read an intelligent book that didn't follow traditional themes like "naive young person falls in love". There were hints of romantic feelings here and there but it wasn't a main focus. The characters were deeper and more developed than in many of the books I've read recently.

    This was one of the best books I've read in a long time!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    worth the effort

    Billy Webb is a twenty-four year old who gets his first post-college adult job working as a lexicographer for the Samuelson Company, an old, well-respected dictionary company in Claxton, Massachusetts. While looking through the citation files (used to show how words are used in context in publications), he finds an odd citation that he shows to a co-worker, Mona. The citation refers to a book, The Broken Teaglass, but Mona can not find verification that this was an actual book. As they search for more 'cits', they discover parts of what seem to be a true story written by someone who must have once worked at Samuelson. They begin a careful search of all the cits to put together this story and find a real-life mystery.


    my review: I was very intrigued by the premise and for anyone who loves words, etymology of words, this has great appeal. It was a bit slow to start, then would get interesting. but then slow again. Twice I decided to abandon the book but then it would pick up again and I realized that I had to finish it. The mystery was fascinating and tragic. Billy and Mona are both low-key characters, but we do get to know Billy and this is a story of his journey as well as the author of the mysterious cits. I liked Billy but found Mona irritating at first, then she grew on me. There was some comic relief; people write and call the dictionary company to recommend words to be added, to argue definitions, and to win at Scrabble.
    The most colorful character was Mr. Phillips, a Samuelson retiree who still comes in once a month to chat and bring donuts. He becomes an important source of information for Billy and Mona.

    This book had a lot of potential that came in the last half of the book and the ending made up for the short-comings in the first half. The story is not mean to be a fast-past mystery but more of a poignant, moving story of secrets and pain. This is not a must-read, but more of a pick-up-from-the-library-and-give-it-a-try-read. I am glad I stuck with it.

    my rating 4/5

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    Interesting setting but not much happening

    It was interesting but nothing really happens...none of the characters gets what they want but as i think about it, none of them really knows what they want...just kind of a sad and lonely story set in a really interesting place. This author's other novel..in search of the rose notes...was really good. This one...not so much.

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  • Posted September 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is a fascinating mystery filled with suspense that hooks the audience

    Billy Webb who just graduated from college begins working as a lexicographer at Samuelson Company publishers of an annual dictionary. Already employed there in a separate cubicle but in a similar editor assistant position is Mona Minot.

    Mona begins to find some strange notes referencing a book THE BROKEN TEAGLASS. She shows her notes to Billy, but neither can find the tome. They conclude someone previously employed at Samuelson left the citations, but not why or what they refer to. As they dig deeper and begin to put meaning to the notes, they begin to believe a murder occurred and some of their cubicle mates may have been involved.

    This is a fascinating mystery filled with suspense that hooks the audience who wonder along with the lead couple whether a homicide occurred and if some of the cubicle mates were involved. In some ways the story line is a coming of age transition tale as Billy struggles with the biggest life change hr has ever faced having just graduated from college. Fans will enjoy this cerebral amateur sleuth as two young lexicographers search for the seemingly nonexistent BROKEN TEAGLASS.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2010

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    Posted January 8, 2010

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    Posted April 25, 2011

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    Posted October 15, 2011

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    Posted July 8, 2014

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    Posted October 23, 2009

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    Posted March 20, 2010

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    Posted November 24, 2010

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    Posted October 18, 2010

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    Posted August 18, 2010

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    Posted June 3, 2010

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    Posted October 3, 2011

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    Posted December 13, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 18 Customer Reviews
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