Customer Reviews for

The Brothers Karamazov (Norton Critical Editions)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

It slowly changed my life. It's still haunting me.

I think I am going to read this wonderful book again. There is so much life and passion in it, that reading it again will definitely enrich my soul even further. I want to tell you how this novel changed my life. It was recommended to me by a Russian Orthodox priest ...
I think I am going to read this wonderful book again. There is so much life and passion in it, that reading it again will definitely enrich my soul even further. I want to tell you how this novel changed my life. It was recommended to me by a Russian Orthodox priest who considered it the best source of Russian Orthodox spirituality in literature. So I read it. I read it because at the time I was striving to become a true Orthodox Christian myself. The result, however, turned out the opposite: I lost any faith I ever had in the truth of the Church and all its dogmas. This book gave me an idea that if there is God, it is certainly not what we are taught He is. I think that in this work Dostoevsky reached the very height of what I would call 'a war with oneself'. He created this unforgettable contrast between what he wanted to believe (and, indeed believed at times) and what he actually was going through in his spiritual search, which were probably indescribable spiritual torments of doubt. I now have this indelible image of Ivan confiding in Alesha, arguing with Satan and, at last, denying God himself in his search for the truth. It was he, who stirred my whole being and it was Dostoevsky himself speaking through Ivan with the most profound sincerety and desperation. On the opposite, Dostoevsky introduces Alyosha, who didn't doubt, but just loved and believed. This young man, according to Dostoevsky's plan, is a prototype of Jesus Christ himself, a man in whom the truth is open within, a man through whom one can truly feel God's love. It is a fascinating character, although, Dostoevsky depicts him in the light of Christian Orthodoxy, as an example of TRUE spirituality, as opposed to any other spirituality. Nevertheless, if we were to take liberties in the interpretation of the work, put the dogmas aside and look at Alyosha as a human being, then we could boldly say, that this young man IS the embodiment of love, truth and godliness. I really would want to at least resemble such a person! And in the midst of this spiritual struggle, there is murder, treachery, repentance, love and comedy, which bring the characters out into your own life. I just love this book! I love the brothers, even though they are so different! There are so many things to love 'The Brothers Karamazov' for, but it is for this brave, but nevertheless desperate challenge to our faith, and at the same time, a great example of living it, that I praise this book so highly. It is truly as rich, thought-provoking and awe-inspiring as life itself. P.S. I highly recommend the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. It is the most correct and true to the spirit of the book translation available. By the way, they also translated 'Crime and Punishment', 'The Demons', 'Notes from the Underground' and lots more, so I recommend those as well. And if you really would like to get the feel of how Dostoevsky DID NOT write, try the translation by Constance Garnett! It is outdated and, frankly, in some places she took liberties at what to leave and what to take out. I read 'The Brothers Karamazov' in Russian and English, going line-by-line sometimes and discovering those literary atrocities all along the text.

posted by Anonymous on August 11, 2000

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Most Helpful Critical Review

21 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

This e-book is NOT the Pevear\Volokhonsky translation!!!

The cover that you see belongs to the Pevear\Volokhonsky translation. If you buy this e-book it is NOT THE PEVEAR translation. This is a Gutenberg press book, not the pevear. I am quite disappointed.

posted by 5681884 on December 23, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2010

    This e-book is NOT the Pevear\Volokhonsky translation!!!

    The cover that you see belongs to the Pevear\Volokhonsky translation. If you buy this e-book it is NOT THE PEVEAR translation. This is a Gutenberg press book, not the pevear. I am quite disappointed.

    21 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 21, 2011

    Do not pay for this!

    Good thing I downloaded the sample first, or I too would have been drawn in by the cover that claims to be the Pevear translation. Don't spend a dime on this freely-available Project Gutenberg edition:

    "The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever."

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    "Don't judge a book by its cover."

    Shame on you, Barnes & Noble, for using the cover of the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation, when it is actually the Project Gutenberg edition. The Brothers Karamazov is a great work of art, but some translations are far superior to others.

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2011

    Incomplete version

    This version of the brothers karamazov is an incomplete download. It leaves out about 20% of the book.

    11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    This Nook eBook is NOT the version on display!!!

    The Brothers Karamazov's translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volonsky is wonderful, the very best so far.

    BUT it is NOT what you see when you open this Nook eBook. The translation you see is by Constance Garnett, made early in the 20th century. And worse, it is a public domain version made available by the Gutenberg Project long ago....

    This is just unbelievable!

    --

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Yea

    Bad fakey

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    DON'T WASTE GOOD SPACE ON THIS BOOK!!!!

    I read this bok over the summer for AP lit, and I hated it. The writing is very hard to understand, and the story is hard to get into. I wouldn't waste goo space on this book. Also, there are a billion different nicknames for each of the characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Do not open this

    It freezes, skips pages, is impossible to read. Buy another version.

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  • Posted August 30, 2011

    SHAME!!!

    I can't believe B&N is trying to pass this off as the new trsnslation published by FSG. I'm glad I read the reviews before falling for your fake cover!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2005

    It's great book, but buy an unabridged copy, or else you will lose the essence of Dostoyevsky's classic.

    I read this book, assuming that it was not an abridged version, but it was. It lacks the chapter of the Grand Inquisitor which is so theologically and philosopically meaningful that it is a shame and a grievous mistake on the printer's part to have omitted it. In addition the end concerning the character Iluisha is the not the actual ending and much of the plot remains unsolved (due to the book's abridged status). What happens to Ivan? What happens to Mitya? The story puts them in harms way, but the end is suddenly cheerful (not because Dostoyevsky put it this way, but because Barnes and Noble didn't want to conclude the story with the essentially details required to understand the story). They should have left the book in its entirety because the person who decided to edit this did not take its meaning and its significance into account.

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    Posted February 5, 2012

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    Posted July 16, 2012

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    Posted December 3, 2011

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    Posted February 9, 2011

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    Posted May 15, 2011

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    Posted May 14, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

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