Customer Reviews for

A Brother's Price

Average Rating 4.5
( 33 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted October 27, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Jennifer Wardrip - Personal Read

    urging me to read fantasy and science fiction novels, to branch out of my safe cocoon of romance books and thrillers. She's touted the works of Wen Spencer as being some of the best, and yes, now that I've had the privilege of reading A BROTHER'S PRICE, I announce to the world that my mom was, as usual, correct. <BR/><BR/>Kudos to Ms. Spencer for getting me so worked up with this book that I'm now compelled to seek out her entire backlist! With A BROTHER'S PRICE, we enter a world in which it's not oil, gold, or money that have the highest monetary value, but men. Men, as in male children born to mothers-an event that happens so rarely that male offspring are often hidden from everyone but immediate family, and that many of these children are treated as a commodity, bought, sold, traded, and sometimes stolen outright. <BR/><BR/>For the women of Wen Spencer's make-believe world-which, by the way, reads as oh-so-probable-having a male child is cause for celebration, joy, and secrecy. Due to miscarriages, still births, and unexplained circumstances, women have no trouble giving birth to a multitude of female offspring, but a boy is a very rare occurrence indeed. <BR/><BR/>For Jerin Whistler, a boy who's near to coming of age and the dreadful thought of being sold into a marriage of his sisters' choosing, taking care of a multitude of younger siblings isn't enough of a life. Taking care of the family farm-when's he let out of his sisters' sight-isn't the kind of life he'd imagined for himself, either. But with so many siblings, the majority of whom are girls, Jerin sees no other life but allowing himself to be sold into marriage for a "brother's price," gaining his sisters monetary gain to continue their way of life. <BR/><BR/>When a mysterious young woman named Ren is left for dead in the wilderness of the Whistler property, Jerin knows that it's his duty to bring the woman to safety and ease her back to health. What a surprise it is when he discovers that the beautiful Ren, for whom he's quickly falling in love, is none other than Princess Rennsellaer. For Jerin's family, all of whom are well-meaning despite their sometimes crass attitudes, Jerin's rescue of a true-blooded Princess is the chance they've been waiting for. All they need to do is return Ren to her royal family, arrange for her marriage to Jerin, and the family will be set for life. <BR/><BR/>As most stories go, however, nothing is ever that simple. Jerin finds himself swept up into royal politics, where some women will stop at nothing to make sure that men are never allowed into positions of power. As Ren and Jerin grow more deeply in love, as tempers rise within the royal family, and as continued attempts to kidnap the Princess need to be thwarted, Jerin realizes that marrying for love might not be as easy as he'd hoped. <BR/><BR/>I loved this book! A twist on the typical royal princess who wants to wait for her "one true love," Wen Spencer's world of too many women and too few men is all too believable. Jerin is a hero that anyone would be proud of, not only for his bravery and devotion, but for his desire to do whatever it takes to keep those he loves safe. <BR/><BR/>To my mom, thanks again for being right! And to Ms. Spencer, thanks for such a fabulous book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2007

    Originally Posted on Romance Junkies

    This may be the first and only time that I'll say this, so everyone should take advantage of it-I was wrong, my mother was right. Sigh For years, my mother has been urging me to read fantasy and science fiction novels, to branch out of my safe cocoon of romance books and thrillers. She's touted the works of Wen Spencer as being some of the best, and yes, now that I've had the privilege of reading A BROTHER'S PRICE, I announce to the world that my mom was, as usual, correct. Kudos to Ms. Spencer for getting me so worked up with this book that I'm now compelled to seek out her entire backlist! With A BROTHER'S PRICE, we enter a world in which it's not oil, gold, or money that have the highest monetary value, but men. Men, as in male children born to mothers-an event that happens so rarely that male offspring are often hidden from everyone but immediate family, and that many of these children are treated as a commodity, bought, sold, traded, and sometimes stolen outright. For the women of Wen Spencer's make-believe world-which, by the way, reads as oh-so-probable-having a male child is cause for celebration, joy, and secrecy. Due to miscarriages, still births, and unexplained circumstances, women have no trouble giving birth to a multitude of female offspring, but a boy is a very rare occurrence indeed. For Jerin Whistler, a boy who's near to coming of age and the dreadful thought of being sold into a marriage of his sisters' choosing, taking care of a multitude of younger siblings isn't enough of a life. Taking care of the family farm-when's he let out of his sisters' sight-isn't the kind of life he'd imagined for himself, either. But with so many siblings, the majority of whom are girls, Jerin sees no other life but allowing himself to be sold into marriage for a 'brother's price,' gaining his sisters monetary gain to continue their way of life. When a mysterious young woman named Ren is left for dead in the wilderness of the Whistler property, Jerin knows that it's his duty to bring the woman to safety and ease her back to health. What a surprise it is when he discovers that the beautiful Ren, for whom he's quickly falling in love, is none other than Princess Rennsellaer. For Jerin's family, all of whom are well-meaning despite their sometimes crass attitudes, Jerin's rescue of a true-blooded Princess is the chance they've been waiting for. All they need to do is return Ren to her royal family, arrange for her marriage to Jerin, and the family will be set for life. As most stories go, however, nothing is ever that simple. Jerin finds himself swept up into royal politics, where some women will stop at nothing to make sure that men are never allowed into positions of power. As Ren and Jerin grow more deeply in love, as tempers rise within the royal family, and as continued attempts to kidnap the Princess need to be thwarted, Jerin realizes that marrying for love might not be as easy as he'd hoped. I loved this book! A twist on the typical royal princess who wants to wait for her 'one true love,' Wen Spencer's world of too many women and too few men is all too believable. Jerin is a hero that anyone would be proud of, not only for his bravery and devotion, but for his desire to do whatever it takes to keep those he loves safe. To my mom, thanks again for being right! And to Ms. Spencer, thanks for such a fabulous book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2005

    Extremely hard to put down!

    I highly recomend this book. Wen Spencer has an amazingly gifted talent for writing in a way where you actually get in touch with what the characters are feeling. It starts off in a world where women rule the land and men are very scarce. Jerin whistler is a male in his family of mostly girls and he is about to become of age to mary. Then a surprise comes when he finds a wounded soldier in the river and takes her in. Turns out she is actually Princess Odelia. When her sisters show up to claim her, Jerin falls in love with Princess Ren. Jerin and Ren go through many challanges and struggles together and im not gonna tell you the end but you HAVE to read this!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2005

    Great Book

    This is a very good read. An imaginative twist on an old theme of male/female class hierarchy. Nice paced action, thoughtful insights. Intriguing to say the least. I've enjoyed several books by this Author, and look forward to more of her imaginative stories.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Impossible to put down

    Imagine a world where women have trouble giving birth to mal children because of an extremely high rate of still births and miscarriages. Women rule the world, run the factories and farms, and keep the males hidden to protect them from desperate females who are husband thieves. Men are considered property with no rights whatsoever. They are sold to wives of their family¿s choosing........................ Jerin Whistler is luckier than most because his family loves him and want to make a match for him that will make him happy. That chance comes when he helps rescue a female on his property who had been attacked. It turns out she is a royal princess and her sister Ren comes to find her. Ren falls in love with the handsome Jerin who shares her feelings. Because they have royal blood flowing through their veins Jerin is considered eligible to be the prince consort. When they get to the capital, all Ren¿s sisters agree to the match but there is a plot to overthrow the crown and Jerin is caught in the crosshairs............................ When it comes to fresh, innovative storytelling, almost nobody is better than Wen Spencer. In a world where men are cosseted and hidden away because they are so rare, the hero accepts his lot in life as the norm since that is how it has always been. Feminists are going to take this book as their symbol because the author proves women can do what are traditional male roles in our world. Once the audience starts this novel, they will find it absolutely impossible to put down.............. Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Love this book. Have read it several times. Love the freshness o

    Love this book. Have read it several times. Love the freshness of a new take on life and viewpoint. Was very well written and entertaining. 
    The Creativity of this writer has me looking for more creative stortlines to read. Thank you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    A Brother's Price

    I love this book. It's the third time I've read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    Expected more...

    This book was excelled in world creation. It was so interesting to read about a world where there are very little men born and due to this women run everything and men are the most valuable thing a family can possess. It turned the world we know upside down, and it was so interesting to see a world where men were the ones who were protected and hidden, and coddled, and who must remain pure...because their biggest value is when they are traded or sold to another family in place of money or land.

    When the men marry into another family...they are husband to all the sisters in that family and their duty is to provide children. A breeding stud mainly. These are the lucky ones. Some who have no option or value or a ruined...end up in "cribs" where they sell their services for whomever shows up that night. Women with no husbands, due to finances or bad luck...go there in desperate hopes of getting pregnant and furthering her family. And the horror of that type of life is the same for male or female.

    All of the details and how this world would function...were very realistically drawn. It was fascinating. The only reason why this book did not score higher was because while the world was believable, I did not buy the main love story. I found that I had no connection to that part of the story because I found it too easy and clean. It told me that Jerin loved Ren, it told me he loved all her other sisters...but I did not really feel it. I did not buy it. He falls in love with the first woman that seduces him, after like one day, and then of course he meets her sister and he can't help but love them too. So his marriage to all of them will be blissful and without problems. And Jerin himself I found too much of a ...to use a common phrase...Mary Sue. Smart, beautiful, kind, loving..everyone loves him and falls in love with him...the perfect person that nothing ever goes wrong and it all always magically works out. I just could not really buy it.

    So loved the world. Not so much the story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2011

    Disappointment

    This book was a snooze and the subject matter was presented in such a way as it wasn't easily believable. i loved Tinker and Wolf who rules, but will be cautious in choosing future books. I can't recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2010

    Intriguing concept, executed well.

    A BROTHER'S PRICE is a "bodice-ripper" romance novel in an alternate world. As other reviewers have explained, men are outnumbered and dominated by women; they are sold or bartered away to marry a family of sisters and live sheltered lives taking care of their many children.

    What I found most impressive about this story is that it *lacked* something I expected. Most books that detail an alternative society will, at some point, advocate the society readers are accustomed to as superior and admirable. While there isn't anything fundamentally wrong with this, it gets tired after a while.

    In A BROTHER'S PRICE, the heroes and heroines find happiness within their own societal rules, which makes the tale more believable. We all tend to set our standards within the guidelines we've been given; why should a sci-fi book's characters be any different? To me, believability is important in any fantasy/sci-fi novel, and Wen Spencer has done a fantastic job with this book. The concepts and characters stuck with me long after I was done reading. Best of all, I'm still not sure if the plot was a satire of the romance genre or not.

    Highly recommended!

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  • Posted January 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    An interesting diversion

    The story is well written. The characters well developed and you really get to know them. The middle of the book was my favorite and I did not think the ending was as believable and interesting as the rest.

    The concept of the story is great. The action/thrilling part was not as well done as the character development, intrigue, and general story. I will read the next book. Nicely done.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2005

    excellent read

    This was an excellent read. Wen Spencer is a new author for me and has a very nice even pace of writing and slowly reveals the world of Jerin and Ren without overwhelming the reader. The logic and order of the world makes sense. I couldn't quite figure out the age of the hero, 16 or 17, but enjoyed the gender switch. I have read stories before about the male and female roles being reversed but the authors have a tendency to hammer their world views down a readers throat and there are discrepencies that don't make any sense. I liked this world and the Whistler family I hope to see more stories about Jerin and his children and the Whistler family. It would be interesting to see if he is able to give his children and grandchildren the same kind of training that his grandmothers gave him.

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    Posted October 28, 2011

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    Posted September 29, 2010

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    Posted August 13, 2011

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    Posted January 20, 2010

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    Posted June 8, 2011

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    Posted March 25, 2010

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    Posted May 17, 2011

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    Posted August 7, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
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