Customer Reviews for

Bull by the Horns: Fighting to Save Main Street from Wall Street and Wall Street from Itself

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 13 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted September 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Best book yet on financial crisis

    I bought Sheila Bair's "Bull by the Horns" to get a first-hand recounting of the financial crisis and a behind-the-scenes look at the cast of characters involved, and have found so much more. It's a fast-paced, eye-opening read that relays important lessons about the causes of and responses to the crisis, and combines them with common-sense policy recommendations. Using the same straight-forward, direct style that served her well as the head of the FDIC, Bair in her book takes the reader past the technical jargon of banking and into a forward-looking, easy-to-understand discussion of how each and every one of us is affected by financial policy. Additionally, she sets the record straight on many of the misconceptions about the financial crisis. "Bull by the Horns" is a great, informative read.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Great Read But Disturbing

    Bair's view from the inside during the melt down is detailed and disturbing. Turbo Tax Tim really is that big of a weasel, and incompetent, as the reader learns during the tale of the crisis. You'll find out just how badly the taxpayer got shafted, and to this day, the shafting continues. At the end of the day, perhaps, the best thing to do with your money is bury it out back in a coffee can before they get the rest of it.

    You won't be happy with 'the system' when you're done, and as she says, we better get vocal and get involved or it's more of the same.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2012

    Quite the inside look

    As the Treasury under Tim Geithner struggled incoherently to keep the banks, brokerages and insurance industry functioning, despite their own incompetence, Sheila Bair's FDIC was often targeted as a cheap (and inconspicuous) source of funds and guarantees. Corruptly, the Obamaites figured a real "team player" would acquiesce quietly to this gutting of protections for individual depositors. They didn't count on this true Republican administrator who came through the entire affair untainted and much loved, both by her staff and the public. Here's the blow-by-blow on those years.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    an utterly withering critique and conviction ¿ devastating in its simplicity and honesty ¿ of our current financial regulatory structure

    a) one of the few non-self-serving descriptions of regulatory structure and reforms during the crisis; a balanced, factual, objective, insightful and accurate recounting of events that, because of the nature of the crisis and the actors and the structure (not the nature or intent of the author), is in large part a brutal expose

    b) an utterly withering critique and conviction – devastating in its simplicity and honesty – of our current financial regulatory structure and its severe dysfunction both in monitoring the status quo and in adapting when faced with changing times

    c) beyond the critique, Bair provides straightforward, actionable, prescriptive recommendations that are clearly presented and explained; this presentation is extremely useful whether or not you agree with them

    d) required reading for anybody touched by the financial regulatory reforms of the past half decade (and who has not been?)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Ms. Sheila Bair summed it up best on page 356 on why she wrote t

    Ms. Sheila Bair summed it up best on page 356 on why she wrote the book. She wanted the reader to see the financial crisis through her eyes and to experience the obstacles that stood in her way as she tried to push for reform measures that were so obviously needed to regulate properly, Wall Street and the financial industry.

    Ms. Bair did a good job taking complex financial issues of the industry and of regulatory agencies’ oversight of the financial industry and presenting them in nonprofessionals’ terminology for the common person to understand. It still at times was difficult reading, but I came away with a better knowledge and understanding of what happened during and after the economic meltdown in the financial industry and how the industry has a disproportionate level of political influence on federal regulatory agencies then do the public, for whom these agencies exist to serve.

    With almost 40 years of government experience at the state and federal levels, it comes as no surprise to me that a symbiotic relationship exists too often between regulators and those for whom they regulate. Too often, there is a swinging door where cross-pollination exists with individuals from the regulatory agencies leaving government service to work in the very companies they regulated and vice versa, where individuals come into government service from the very industry for which they have responsibility to regulate.

    Ms. Bair’s book exposes this farce. She shows exactly why it is difficult to get the full consumer protection for Main Street when the industries influence heavily legislation governing the federal agencies that have oversight of the private sector.

    Ms. Bair seems optimistic that the common person can change the situation, but I am not so optimistic based on my almost four decades of government service. That the “rich and powerful” have the most influence on American politics is hardly news. As George Orwell put it, “money makes some people more equal than others.”

    As long as there are wealthy, powerful and influential special interest groups, then they will continue to emasculate government regulatory agencies in their endeavors to serve the public interest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2014

    Jake

    Luna, come with me to res 11 honey.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2014

    Well done!

    Hard to believe a subject seemingly as dry as dust could be so interesting. It almost read like a novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    Calla

    Calla groans.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    Leslie

    A human i nude watches.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Great book! It stated the pain everybody went to the crisis, of

    Great book! It stated the pain everybody went to the crisis, of course except the CEOs in the big banks. No matter how, the tax payers suffered, the CEOs still traveled with the private jet and enjoyed the luxury that the tax payer paid for

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 13 Customer Reviews
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