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Burning Chrome

Average Rating 4
( 18 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2004

    Classic SF Short Stories

    Burning Chrome is a collection of ten short stories by William Gibson, three of which are collaborations with other authors. It's an eclectic ride as a whole. There is no overriding theme that ties all of the stories together - they range from cyberpunk to surreal. Gibson's prose can be very poetic and he does an excellent job of setting the mood in each story. Even when his characters aren't very likeable, you can still identify with their emotions. 'Johnny Mnemonic', 'New Rose Hotel' and 'Burning Chrome' are written in the same 'Sprawl' setting as many of Gibson's novels. They are sharp and explosive cyberpunk stories that grab your attention and run. 'The Gernsback Continuum' and 'The Belonging Kind' are trips through what could be present day America with surreal twists. 'Red Star, Winter Orbit', written with Bruce Sterling, is the poignant tale of an aging Russian cosmonaut on an equally aging space station. 'Hinterlands' is an eerie view of how far humans will go to satisfy the need for progress and exploration. 'Fragments of a Hologram Rose', 'The Winter Market' and 'Dogfight' are powerful studies of emotion, need, and what it means to be human. Overall, I enjoyed Burning Chrome. Gibson's writing style is fun to read - he can establish mood and atmosphere in a few short sentences. I also like that he uses technology as a means not an end - the focus in the stories is how people interact with each other and technology instead of showcasing what a cool idea a particular future technology would be. His stories tend to deal with the grittier side of human nature, and are not always comfortable to read, but they make you think.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2004

    Cyberpunk Primer

    This collection of short stories is a fascinating look at the early work of William Gibson, the father of the sub-genre 'cyberpunk.' Many of the stories, such as 'Johnny Mnemonic' and 'Burning Chrome' lay the foundation for, and introduce characters from, Gibson's seminal Sprawl Trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdirve), which remains his greatest work. Other stories echo more traditional science fiction such as the Twilight Zone or Arthur C. Clarke, with typical Gibson twist. Gibson typically takes an interesting idea, creates an edgy near-future setting and populates it with hip, noirish techno-criminals, tying it all together with poetic prose. Plot and pacing remain his weakness, but the short story format allows him to express himself without having to fill a full-length novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2003

    vintage gibson

    If you're a fan of hard boiled fiction or hard sci-fi, this collection of Gibson's early short stories is for you. When reading the stories consider when they were written. Then you may understand how visionary the author is.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2000

    A good Gibson primer...

    This book is an excellent introduction to the work of William Gibson. These are the stories that will help determine whether one loves or loathes Gibson's style, vision, and characters. The title story contains what someone described as 'high tech and hopeless romance' as the narrator describes a caper to electronically rob a Mafia crimelord. 'New Rose Hotel' is another narrative portraying a bleak future where corporate kidnappings play a part in career moves. The stories with a lighter touch, though, (such as 'The Gernsback Continuum', where a photographer gets exposed to visions of a creepily perfect alternate present) help keep more sensitive readers from reaching for the Prozac. Consider this book a good test sample. Either you will loathe it, in which case you aren't out a whole lot, or else you will enjoy it. In the latter case, Gibson's other books await you!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2014

    Where Cyberspace started

    Gibson is famous for having coined the term "cyberspace" and these early stories include the work that famously did that job. Some of his best work, collected.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Get a pink ipad

    Kiss youre hand 3 times post this three times and look under youre pillow.

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    Posted November 9, 2008

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