Customer Reviews for

Buso Renkin, Volume 1

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Awesome series

This is a really good series, I would definitely recommend it to anyone who likes action, a good laugh, and just having fun with a slacker or a do-it-now-think-later type. It is definitely one of the most halarious mangas' I've read since Ranma 1/2.

posted by Anonymous on January 14, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Buso Renkin is a manga, and later anime, from the creato

Buso Renkin
is a manga, and later anime, from the creator of the Rurouni Kenshin
series, Nobuhiro Watsuki. The story is a simple one. The alchemy that was abandoned in Europe centuries ago, the stuff of Nicholas Flammel and the search for immortality, se...
Buso Renkin
is a manga, and later anime, from the creator of the Rurouni Kenshin
series, Nobuhiro Watsuki. The story is a simple one. The alchemy that was abandoned in Europe centuries ago, the stuff of Nicholas Flammel and the search for immortality, secretly did produce results. There were two types of alchemical discoveries, the homunculus and the Buso Renkin.

The homunculus is a plant and animal hybrid type of organism that takes control of a victim and eventually kills them, coming to life in their brain and nervous system, thus taking over their bodies. The Buso Renkin, on the other hand, is a weapon used to defeat such creatures. The homunculus eats different things, but mostly eats people, and so you can see where this is going.

To say that the above premise has some elements in common with modern vampire myths would be an understatement. All you need to do is replace “homunculus” with “vampire” and “blood” with “entire body”, and you have the same concept. And then you have the vampire hunters....

Anyways, our story begins when our young hero, Kazuki, stumbles across a girl about to be eaten by a monster, and tries to save her, getting brutally killed for his trouble. Unbeknownst to Kazuki, and the monster for that matter, the girl was an “alchemic warrior”, a holder of a Buso Renkin. She was luring the monster out so she could kill it and save the local human populace from being eaten.

The girl, feeling both sorry and touched by Kazuki's unnecessary, but noble, death, brings him back to life with a Buso Renkin. Upon discovering what happened to him, Kazuki vows to join the girl, named Tokiko, in battling the monsters of his city.

Buso Renkin
is a very different comic than Rurouni Kenshin
. While Kenshin
had it's share of fantastical stories, to be sure, it was grounded in a thoroughly non-fantasy world. Everything was shonen
, or kick-ass and manly man, but it was still within the bounds of a non-fantastical setting. This is a thoroughly magical, fantastical story.

The only part I didn't like was that the tale has none of the moral components that Watsuki put in the Kenshin
stories. Instead, it was a typical fantasy story, at least until the second volume which I am currently reading, but this is a review of the first volume so that is irrelevant for now.

All in all, I enjoy the second volume more than this first volume being here reviewed, but it was still a fun story, though not as good, in my opinion, as Rurouni Kenshin
.

posted by MereChristian on July 9, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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  • Posted July 9, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Buso Renkin is a manga, and later anime, from the creato

    <i>Buso Renkin</i>
    is a manga, and later anime, from the creator of the <i>Rurouni Kenshin</i>
    series, Nobuhiro Watsuki. The story is a simple one. The alchemy that was abandoned in Europe centuries ago, the stuff of Nicholas Flammel and the search for immortality, secretly did produce results. There were two types of alchemical discoveries, the homunculus and the Buso Renkin.

    The homunculus is a plant and animal hybrid type of organism that takes control of a victim and eventually kills them, coming to life in their brain and nervous system, thus taking over their bodies. The Buso Renkin, on the other hand, is a weapon used to defeat such creatures. The homunculus eats different things, but mostly eats people, and so you can see where this is going.

    To say that the above premise has some elements in common with modern vampire myths would be an understatement. All you need to do is replace “homunculus” with “vampire” and “blood” with “entire body”, and you have the same concept. And then you have the vampire hunters....

    Anyways, our story begins when our young hero, Kazuki, stumbles across a girl about to be eaten by a monster, and tries to save her, getting brutally killed for his trouble. Unbeknownst to Kazuki, and the monster for that matter, the girl was an “alchemic warrior”, a holder of a Buso Renkin. She was luring the monster out so she could kill it and save the local human populace from being eaten.

    The girl, feeling both sorry and touched by Kazuki's unnecessary, but noble, death, brings him back to life with a Buso Renkin. Upon discovering what happened to him, Kazuki vows to join the girl, named Tokiko, in battling the monsters of his city.

    <i>Buso Renkin</i>
    is a very different comic than <i>Rurouni Kenshin</i>
    . While <i>Kenshin</i>
    had it's share of fantastical stories, to be sure, it was grounded in a thoroughly non-fantasy world. Everything was <i>shonen</i>
    , or kick-ass and manly man, but it was still within the bounds of a non-fantastical setting. This is a thoroughly magical, fantastical story.

    The only part I didn't like was that the tale has none of the moral components that Watsuki put in the <i>Kenshin</i>
    stories. Instead, it was a typical fantasy story, at least until the second volume which I am currently reading, but this is a review of the first volume so that is irrelevant for now.

    All in all, I enjoy the second volume more than this first volume being here reviewed, but it was still a fun story, though not as good, in my opinion, as <i>Rurouni Kenshin</i>
    .

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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