Customer Reviews for

Cain

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted December 29, 2011

    The Dark Side of Man

    The biblical story of Cain and Abel is about the rivalry between competing siblings who fought to garner the attention of the Lord. We know from our biblical studies that one wins out but what happen after the divisive clash?
    José Saramago in Cain: A Novel takes the tale further, the surviving brother Cain, is banished and goes on a journey. This path leads past Noah¿s world to Sodom and then he stumbles on the building of the great ark.
    Saramago blends in the expectation of man being a mirror of God but filled with human frailties, lust, carnal desires, and vengefulness are the short comings of the son of God.
    Cain: A Novel by José Saramago is a powerful reminder of dark side of the human spirit that wavers between good and evil.
    Man¿s inner struggles are rooted in the sins of our forefathers.
    José Saramago (1922-2010) was the author of many works and is a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Cain Enabler

    Saramago's Cain is a satire that takes the moral ideas of the Old Testament to their logical conclusions. From the beginning, God appears on stage as the antagonist, or if you like, the Antichrist, to Cain, a simple farmer who only wants his sacrifice of crops to be as appreciated as Abel's sacrifice of livestock. Both the agrarian culture and the cruel, unfair 'justice' of the ancient 'Holy Land' are on display here, as is the true, terrifying nature of Old Testament morality. Surely such an evil collection of screeds was written to be savaged in later centuries by a great writer like Saramago? Who could find morality in the Book of Job, where God allows Satan to torture one of his beloved creations simply to prove a point, especially since God, being God, would already know the outcome? What is there to be learned in the story of Noah and the Ark, except that God apparently got it wrong in the first creation and was insane enough to try it again WITH THE SAME CREATURES? These and other stories are skewered by Cain, probably the most hated man in the Old Testament, if not all 66 books in the Bible. The real surprise with this story is that it hasn't been done before, given the countless unexplored possibilities of such a character. Although Baudelaire used Cain as a leader for the meek against the unjust majesty of God, Saramago is the first writer I know of who rightly decided that the Old Testament could use a bracing shot of humor. I can only imagine how much pleasure this book gives in the original Portuguese. In a long, admirably provocative career, Saramago impatiently dragged us along the first steps toward a future, more perfect Enlightenment, this time completely overthrowing the voluntary shackles of religion and hokey spiritualism and replacing them with humor, irony, and a secular morality grounded in human experience.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2014

    Trash

    Don't buy if you are expecting to read of the clan wars of ca in and seth and the Clan of Seth apparantly won as Noah's family was the only eight to urvive the flood. This makes a mockery of the Holy Bible, Gods Cherbim, and religion itself. This by the way is a very old book by a long dead trash writer. Don't let yourselves pay the trash writers decendants another dime. This also is not a novel, just an idiot ideaology of an idiot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2013

    Emma

    "Yeeahh."

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    Flight

    :)

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Shadow

    Is ur name pronounced kane or ca Ine.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A short, quick, enthralling read

    A wholly irreverent and fascinating tale of Cain, who kills his brother because God, for some reason, doesn't like his offering as much as Abel's, and then has to get the heck outta dodge. Wandering from one land to another (even whisked through different time periods), he experiences major ups and downs - notably coming across Abraham and Isaac, taking away the knife and asking "Exactly what is your problem?!? You're about to kill your own boy because you were told to? Ya freakin' basket case..." A number of verbal disputes with God are also included, and it ends in high fashion with Cain on the Ark (SPOILER: most of the precious few selected to ride the big boat and repopulate the Earth don't survive the trip). NOT for the faint of heart or the pious as murder, mayhem and wild sex are in plentiful supply.

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  • Posted December 21, 2011

    An irreverent reinterpretation of Genesis by a Nobel Laureate

    This short novel is a wickedly devilish, irreverent take on the familiar stories of Genesis. Cain is imagined as a Zelig-like character who is miraculously present at the major events of the first book of the Old Testament, including Abraham's near sacrifice of Isaac, the building of Noah's Ark, the fall of Jericho, the halting of the sun in the sky to permit Joshua's victory, the destruction of Sodom and Gemorrah, and others. Cain and the narrator's viewpoints on the behavior of God and His angels could reflect the cynical perspective of a Holden Caulfield. This is a mind-bending, eyebrow-raising, laugh-out-loud tour de force.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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