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Cain at Gettysburg

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Allow me to answer the first question most readers of Killer Ang

Allow me to answer the first question most readers of Killer Angels ask.

Yes. Cain At Gettysburg is as good as Michael Shaara's novel and in some ways it is better. Peters is a career military man who also writes compelling fiction. Owen Parry is a pseudonym of Ralph P...
Allow me to answer the first question most readers of Killer Angels ask.

Yes. Cain At Gettysburg is as good as Michael Shaara's novel and in some ways it is better. Peters is a career military man who also writes compelling fiction. Owen Parry is a pseudonym of Ralph Peters and Parry writes a detective/mystery series with Able Jones as the main character. Enjoyable and having eastern a Pennsylvania and Washington D.C. settings, CWL always looks forward to the next in the series. With really good fiction, the reader finishes the novel and ponders the characters, the plot, the setting and the truths that fiction is able to tell.

Peters' Cain At Gettysburg may be the most accurate fiction work about Gettysburg. The best fiction offers felt facts and felt history: what is going on in the inside of the generals and the combat soldiers. Killer Angels and Cain at Gettysburg are informed to a degree by Biblical notions. Peter's detective Abel Jones often presents an 19th century understanding of religion, faith and justice. Peters does so again in Cain at Gettysburg. Two characters in the 26th North Carolina are very familiar with the Bible and quote it to explain or describe a situation, environment or the human condition. Blake, a sergeant, has turned in back of his Quaker faith and Cobb, a private, has turned is back on his call to preach.

German and Irish immigrants are in the forefront of Cain at Gettysburg. Peters challenges the myths of Germans and the Irish unwillingness to fight and fighting poorly when they do. Generated by the press, these stereotypes dominated wartime and post-war interpretations of the battle. In contrast, the author offers a 'boots on the ground' perspective of what the Germans and Irish accomplished through courage and tenacity.

There are extensive scenes with George Gordon Meade, the Federal commander and Robert E. Lee, the Confederate commander. Meade is the center of scenes regarding Federal military leadership; Lee is often viewed through the eyes of Longstreet, a Confederate corps commander. Sickles, Federal corps commander, drives the story forward at times. Peter's expertise as a army veteran intelligence officer and strategist comes to the fore in these characters' interior thoughts. Among these generals, it is Meade and Sickles that are most fully described. Meade, who took command of the Army not quite three day before the battle, becomes exhausted in course of six days. Sickles, who left his troops right after the May 1863 battle of Chancellorsville, returns less than three full days before the July battle of Gettysburg. He is the politician-on-the-make who needs battlefield glory to rehabilitate his career from a pre-war murder charge. The Confederate officers are exhausted and aware that their futures are in the balance during the battle. They each realize that imminent capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi will tip the war's balance as would a defeat in Pennsylvania.

A major difference between Killer Angels and Cain at Gettysburg is the realism. There are vulgar dialogues and behaviors in Peters' novel. Latrine issues in open fields and shaded woods are described; human and animal corpses are graphically described. All the wounds in Cain at Gettysburg are felt and shown, not just mentioned. Lusts, hatreds and bigotries are among the common discourse of the soldiers. The Blue and The Grey are not brothers but enemies intent on killing each other.

So, Cain at Gettysburg stands beside Killer Angels on CWL's personal bookshelf along with
Shelby Foote's Shiloh, Perry Lentz's The Falling Hills, Richard Slotkin's The Crater and Howard Bahr's The Black Flower. Each are very fine novels with their individual strengths.

posted by civiwarlibrarian on May 17, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

A novel as much of a failure as Picketts Charge

As a student of the Civil War and Gettysburg I was dissapointed in this novel. The author's writing skills are terrible and many times make no sense. I wanted so badly to enjoy this novel to try and recapture the magic of reading The Killer Angles for the first time, ...
As a student of the Civil War and Gettysburg I was dissapointed in this novel. The author's writing skills are terrible and many times make no sense. I wanted so badly to enjoy this novel to try and recapture the magic of reading The Killer Angles for the first time, but was distraugt to discover that these two books can not even be placed on the same level. One positive of the novel is that it paints a picture of the horrors of the Civil War and does not shy away from those truths. I respect the author for researcing this novel, but can not honestly recommend this novel to others.

posted by 9376779 on June 16, 2012

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  • Posted May 17, 2012

    Allow me to answer the first question most readers of Killer Ang

    Allow me to answer the first question most readers of Killer Angels ask.

    Yes. Cain At Gettysburg is as good as Michael Shaara's novel and in some ways it is better. Peters is a career military man who also writes compelling fiction. Owen Parry is a pseudonym of Ralph Peters and Parry writes a detective/mystery series with Able Jones as the main character. Enjoyable and having eastern a Pennsylvania and Washington D.C. settings, CWL always looks forward to the next in the series. With really good fiction, the reader finishes the novel and ponders the characters, the plot, the setting and the truths that fiction is able to tell.

    Peters' Cain At Gettysburg may be the most accurate fiction work about Gettysburg. The best fiction offers felt facts and felt history: what is going on in the inside of the generals and the combat soldiers. Killer Angels and Cain at Gettysburg are informed to a degree by Biblical notions. Peter's detective Abel Jones often presents an 19th century understanding of religion, faith and justice. Peters does so again in Cain at Gettysburg. Two characters in the 26th North Carolina are very familiar with the Bible and quote it to explain or describe a situation, environment or the human condition. Blake, a sergeant, has turned in back of his Quaker faith and Cobb, a private, has turned is back on his call to preach.

    German and Irish immigrants are in the forefront of Cain at Gettysburg. Peters challenges the myths of Germans and the Irish unwillingness to fight and fighting poorly when they do. Generated by the press, these stereotypes dominated wartime and post-war interpretations of the battle. In contrast, the author offers a 'boots on the ground' perspective of what the Germans and Irish accomplished through courage and tenacity.

    There are extensive scenes with George Gordon Meade, the Federal commander and Robert E. Lee, the Confederate commander. Meade is the center of scenes regarding Federal military leadership; Lee is often viewed through the eyes of Longstreet, a Confederate corps commander. Sickles, Federal corps commander, drives the story forward at times. Peter's expertise as a army veteran intelligence officer and strategist comes to the fore in these characters' interior thoughts. Among these generals, it is Meade and Sickles that are most fully described. Meade, who took command of the Army not quite three day before the battle, becomes exhausted in course of six days. Sickles, who left his troops right after the May 1863 battle of Chancellorsville, returns less than three full days before the July battle of Gettysburg. He is the politician-on-the-make who needs battlefield glory to rehabilitate his career from a pre-war murder charge. The Confederate officers are exhausted and aware that their futures are in the balance during the battle. They each realize that imminent capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi will tip the war's balance as would a defeat in Pennsylvania.

    A major difference between Killer Angels and Cain at Gettysburg is the realism. There are vulgar dialogues and behaviors in Peters' novel. Latrine issues in open fields and shaded woods are described; human and animal corpses are graphically described. All the wounds in Cain at Gettysburg are felt and shown, not just mentioned. Lusts, hatreds and bigotries are among the common discourse of the soldiers. The Blue and The Grey are not brothers but enemies intent on killing each other.

    So, Cain at Gettysburg stands beside Killer Angels on CWL's personal bookshelf along with
    Shelby Foote's Shiloh, Perry Lentz's The Falling Hills, Richard Slotkin's The Crater and Howard Bahr's The Black Flower. Each are very fine novels with their individual strengths.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Reveals the very soul of the Battle of Gettysburg

    The award-winning author’s latest novel is a true masterpiece that reveals the very soul of the Civil War’s most famous battle. Peters’ riveting novel vividly brings the battle’s desperate fighting to life through the eyes of historical figures and unforgettable fictional characters in a way no other novelist has achieved. Reading Cain at Gettysburg is the closest any of us today will ever come to actually experiencing the horror of Civil War combat.
    Peters has studied the Battle of Gettysburg throughout his life, and his expertise on the battle is clearly demonstrated in his marvelous prose capturing the 'real' experience of those who fought on both sides. His knowledge of the battle is revealed in his presentation of important aspects of the fighting that other authors are either ignorant of or who ignore in their books. For example, Peters spotlights the crucial role in the Union victory of Union Army of the Potomac Chief of Artillery General Henry Hunt and his Union gunners. Hunt's positioning of Union artillery throughout the battle's three days and particularly Hunt's discipline during the battle's final day -- when he conserved the Union's precious artillery and ammunition in the face of strong pressure by Union infantry commanders to open fire early -- that preserved the artillery in order to blast to shreds Pickett's Charge and thereby decisively defeat Lee's last attempt to salvage a victory. Such insight into what really happened in the Battle of Gettysburg make Peters' superb novel THE classic account of the Civil War's greatest battle.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2012

    Marching into the fire.

    Ralph Peters has done a masterful job of bringing to life the men who fought through the fields and woods of Adams County, Pennsylvania in July, 1863. Not one in a thousand soldiers had ever heard of Gettysburg before that month, but none of them would ever forget their experiences there. Thoroughly researched by soldier-turned-author Peters, this is a wonderfully readable account of not just the three-day battle but the individual American soldiers who struggled there. You owe it to yourself to read this story as told by someone who truly cares about our collective history. It is superb!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2012

    highly recommended

    Any one interested in the civil war should read this book. The truth comes out. Well written

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2012

    A novel as much of a failure as Picketts Charge

    As a student of the Civil War and Gettysburg I was dissapointed in this novel. The author's writing skills are terrible and many times make no sense. I wanted so badly to enjoy this novel to try and recapture the magic of reading The Killer Angles for the first time, but was distraugt to discover that these two books can not even be placed on the same level. One positive of the novel is that it paints a picture of the horrors of the Civil War and does not shy away from those truths. I respect the author for researcing this novel, but can not honestly recommend this novel to others.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 22, 2012

    Well written , realistic

    I have read about the civil war and v8sited Gettysberg many times since my 1st in 1947. While I don,t usually read historical fiction , I found Peter's recital accurate and engrossing. He gave the battle a sense of reality with his characters . I found his portrayal of the officers on both sides spot on and their comments fit in with the facts. I reccomendation. this book can't wait for his
    Next.
    Hmg 14th Brooklyn

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2013

    10/22/13

    10/22/13 A realistic and emotional work on the Battle of Gettysburg.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2013

    Poor

    A glorification of traitors and rebels.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 19, 2013

    Vivid word pictures about this major Civil War battle. Excellent book!

    I am not a person who enjoys blood and guts books, but this vivid recreation of this major battle during the civil war is excellent. It is a long book - developing the characters of the generals who won/lost the war. Astonishing how the various personalities impact the battle. One wonders if there is a lot of that in these times as well! Well worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    YOU LIVE THE BATTLE!

    No matter how many times I walked the Gettysburg battle fields, I still wonder if I understand this historic battle. This book is the most factual work of fiction ever published on the subject and puts the reader right in the midst of the encampments, battles, and personal stories of the men who fought on both sides. An absolute amazing read! This is not a love story...simply a factual, well written work of fiction which truly puts the reader in Gettysburg, PA in early July 1863! ENJOY

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