Customer Reviews for

Calling Invisible Women: A Novel

Average Rating 4
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Read sample

I can't believe there is not more dicussion on this topic and book....where are all the fifty something women?? Oh thars right...you are there...just can't see you..

As a 55 yr old woman...this strange shroud of invisibility has been coming for years...even if the boo...
I can't believe there is not more dicussion on this topic and book....where are all the fifty something women?? Oh thars right...you are there...just can't see you..

As a 55 yr old woman...this strange shroud of invisibility has been coming for years...even if the book does not offer a factual account...we all have to admit..there is some merit to this topic...

Did anyone tell us?? That at approx. 50ish, the husband who at least attempted to be in good standing and present is no longer caring whether you would like more time with him...no one told me in spite of keeping myself appearance pleasing that the distance would come..

And what about strangers...it is getting pretty bad when you enter a building at the same time while waiting for an elevator with another woman your age, and get completely ignored after commenting on the sweltering heat...now there was a topic you could get anyone to comment on...when you could be seen, but now you are invisible...she stands there and instead of saying..."yes, i agree" she starts to look down and shovel through a handful of envelopes which seem an odd thing to be holding as if you are going to hand them to someone...

We both go to the third floor of the building, where the allergy shots are given...and if i did not think she was rude before...i do now...because of her lack in common courtesy...everyone knows that if someone gets on the elevator first, you allow them opportunity to get off first...at designated floor...this rude and much more unattractive 50 something woman jumps in front of me to get out before i do...stands in line to get her shot...

Now the question ...was she a sociopath or narcissist who did not have courteous intentions...or did she really see me? I truly felt like someone in a sixth sense film with bruce willis...invisible!!

Another oddity...she did not give her stack of envelopes to receptionist...i watched...when she sit down...she no longer had them...could holding envelopes appearing to be distracted her ruse to avoid people in general? She acted like those envelopes revealed a secret she needed to get to in order to take her next breath...when she was waiting for the elevator..

My point...if someone does not want to see you, they won't...even if you are laying next to them...we make choices in life..i have chosen to never ignore anyone sharing airspace with me at that moment...i notice everything...even the paperwork you are holding...you will get a response out of me...i am present and so are you...

posted by Anonymous on July 8, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

A disappointment

I loved Ms. Ray's previous work, but hard as I tried did not enjoy this book. The comparison of women who "feel" invisible vs. actually becoming invisible is ridiculous. It was just too far-fetched for my taste. It couldn't happen and even the most negligent family, fri...
I loved Ms. Ray's previous work, but hard as I tried did not enjoy this book. The comparison of women who "feel" invisible vs. actually becoming invisible is ridiculous. It was just too far-fetched for my taste. It couldn't happen and even the most negligent family, friends or strangers would notice there was something amiss. Glad I borrowed this from the library.

posted by nmtmp on May 29, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Read sample

    I can't believe there is not more dicussion on this topic and book....where are all the fifty something women?? Oh thars right...you are there...just can't see you..

    As a 55 yr old woman...this strange shroud of invisibility has been coming for years...even if the book does not offer a factual account...we all have to admit..there is some merit to this topic...

    Did anyone tell us?? That at approx. 50ish, the husband who at least attempted to be in good standing and present is no longer caring whether you would like more time with him...no one told me in spite of keeping myself appearance pleasing that the distance would come..

    And what about strangers...it is getting pretty bad when you enter a building at the same time while waiting for an elevator with another woman your age, and get completely ignored after commenting on the sweltering heat...now there was a topic you could get anyone to comment on...when you could be seen, but now you are invisible...she stands there and instead of saying..."yes, i agree" she starts to look down and shovel through a handful of envelopes which seem an odd thing to be holding as if you are going to hand them to someone...

    We both go to the third floor of the building, where the allergy shots are given...and if i did not think she was rude before...i do now...because of her lack in common courtesy...everyone knows that if someone gets on the elevator first, you allow them opportunity to get off first...at designated floor...this rude and much more unattractive 50 something woman jumps in front of me to get out before i do...stands in line to get her shot...

    Now the question ...was she a sociopath or narcissist who did not have courteous intentions...or did she really see me? I truly felt like someone in a sixth sense film with bruce willis...invisible!!

    Another oddity...she did not give her stack of envelopes to receptionist...i watched...when she sit down...she no longer had them...could holding envelopes appearing to be distracted her ruse to avoid people in general? She acted like those envelopes revealed a secret she needed to get to in order to take her next breath...when she was waiting for the elevator..

    My point...if someone does not want to see you, they won't...even if you are laying next to them...we make choices in life..i have chosen to never ignore anyone sharing airspace with me at that moment...i notice everything...even the paperwork you are holding...you will get a response out of me...i am present and so are you...

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    A disappointment

    I loved Ms. Ray's previous work, but hard as I tried did not enjoy this book. The comparison of women who "feel" invisible vs. actually becoming invisible is ridiculous. It was just too far-fetched for my taste. It couldn't happen and even the most negligent family, friends or strangers would notice there was something amiss. Glad I borrowed this from the library.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Well written book

    I picked this book as part of my commitment to the Oprah facebook site, and I was not disappointed by it. It's a fun story about unintended medical side effects, and I think most housewives would agree that there are times when we feel invisible, too. It might make a good book for a book club discussion, too.
    I enjoyed it and will look for other books by this author.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2012

    See What Should Be

    This is a great metaphor for any woman who has felt invisible at some point in time or some place in space. But anyone who has ever wanted to be invisible will relate to Clover. Going with her on her journey is discomfiting and fun in the same instant. And discovering how those around her come to grips with their hopes leaves the reader mighty satisfied.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 30, 2013

    Calling Invisible Women is the fifth novel by American author, J

    Calling Invisible Women is the fifth novel by American author, Jeanne Ray. Like many women in their fifties holding down jobs and looking after families, Clover Hobart has often felt like she’s invisible. Then, one day she wakes up to find she actually is. Invisible. However, no-one seems to notice; not her paediatrician husband, Arthur, not her adult children, Nick and Evie. In fact, only her best friend Gilda actually realises something is wrong. But quite by accident, Clover discovers other women with her predicament, and learns how this has happened. This insightful novel is about perception and self-image; about perspective and being brave and jumping back into life; about workplace discrimination; about multi-national drug companies and cover-ups; about supporting each other and deciding to fight like Goliath even when you are David. Ray touches on health kicks and magic bullets and boarding planes. I expect sales of Rive Gauche may well increase thanks to Ray’s latest perceptive, thought-provoking and laugh-out-loud funny offering.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2013

    Quite possibly one of the best books I've read in months!  What

    Quite possibly one of the best books I've read in months!  What would you do if suddenly you woke one morning to discover you were invisible.  Not metaphorically.  Physically invisible.  Your family, friends, neighbors, and co-workers couldn't see you anymore.  Clover faces this situation with courage and pluck, meeting with a group of other local women who were also invisible.  And together they launched an investigation into the cause of their plight.  As the story progresses, answers are found, friendships are forged, and invisibility becomes a power more than a disability.  In invisibility comes a bravery many of the women may not have possessed otherwise, and together they waged a battle against the pharmaceutical company that was at fault for their condition.  While the story does not wrap its conclusion with a neat bow, tying up all loose ends, it is satisfying.  An outstanding read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2013

    This book works on many levels. It's the kind of book that warr

    This book works on many levels. It's the kind of book that warrants a book club discussion. Yes, the premise of actual invisibility might be far-fetched, but it brings out so many questions about our seeming invisibility when we reach a certain age. The storyline about the unintended consequences of the medication causing actual invisibility just lends a way to offer some very humorous twists in the story. I've recommended this book to numerous friends. It's worth the read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Creative, exciting & fun

    What a great writer! A new, fun way to approach women! Light reading that makes you smile.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Entertaining!

    An imaginative, yet realistic read. I appreciate the LOL scenes the author created. It's a good balance between a "light read" and a book that touches on the issues of women who are middle-aged. Jeanne Ray continues to not disappoint.

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  • Posted April 19, 2013

    Enjoyable Read

    Fun book to read. It's hard to find books about "women of a certain age" that doesn't involve romance, but shows tenacity and growth of an individual. Enjoyable and surprise ending.

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  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Brings the metaphor of invisibility to life!

    What a creative romp into the real life experience of women as we age!
    Ray shines a positive light onto the potential power of life's curve ball by reminding us to see or use the advantages. Women will delight in her humor and drive; men will delight in finding new ways to see women united in solidarity taking on their oppressors.
    MBD NY

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    Fun read

    Quick and witty

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    Fun!

    It was a funny read with a zanny premis that I couldn't believe could remain fresh for the entire story. A charmer.

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  • Posted December 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I loved this quirky, silly, outlandish book! There is the seriou

    I loved this quirky, silly, outlandish book! There is the serious theme of how over time, we as women, begin to feel invisible to those around us. We are simply the driver, shopper, cook, walker of dogs, etc.. We are too busy for deep friendship and even when we are with friends, it can feel superficial. The author touches on this in a very fictional way that has the reader nodding and laughing all at the same time.

    I highly recommend this book...just be sure to clear your mind of any need for this to be plausible. Enjoy it for the fun story that it is.

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  • Posted November 30, 2012

    Humorous and Poignant

    This humorous, yet poignant story about a woman becoming invisible makes you first wonder whether it's her imagination or whether it's real. While examining the typical middle-age crisis that many women face, the story also takes a literal bend which oddly works. I recommend this especially to women who once felt visible to the world, but now through aging and losing youthful appeal, have found that not only they have disappeared in other's eyes, but have disappeared in their own as well. A sweet and I think, fast read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2012

    Fun and clever

    I enjoyed it. I am a 30 something wife and mother and yet can definitely relate! Yes, it requires some degree of "suspension of disbelief", but it's fiction folks!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    Loved it

    If you read it as a tongue in cheek book it is great. A fun read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    not good to bad

    The idea for the plot is different. There were some good points made by some of the characters. The ending is very disappointing. I would not recommend this book.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2012

    Fresh, original premise -- a fun read

    This is a frothy, well-paced story that zips along from beginning to end. No slow parts. I finished in less than twenty-four hours and I never get through a book that fast. Jeanne Ray uses just the right, light touch that enables the reader to suspend disbelief and go along with the premise. Sympathetic characters, absurd situations and tongue-in-cheek humor abound. Ray has a real knack for first-person narration, and the natural ease in her voice serves the story well here. The only thing I didn't like in the book was the self-absorbed daughter, Evie. A redeeming quality or two would have made her more tolerable. The male teenagers and the husband, on the other hand, came across as far more likeable, a nice thing to see in a "women's issue" novel. As for those reviewers who couldn't buy into the notion of physical invisibility --hello people, this is fiction. Get an imagination!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 23, 2012

    A book that makes one much more aware that over time women do be

    A book that makes one much more aware that over time women do become
    taken for granted and to a point become invisible to strangers and loved
    ones. But the storyline being that we are to imagine that those around
    us would not notice if we were suddenly missing our heads made me think
    at times that I was reading a book for children, especially during the
    bank robbery and the trying on of rings at Tiffany's. The book lacks
    the compassion that could have made it more heartfelt, believable, and a
    worthwhile read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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