Customer Reviews for

The Capitol Game

Average Rating 4.5
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 40 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted June 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Capital Game will be short-listed as one of the best financial thrillers of the year

    At Caldron Security equity firm, no one has risen to the ranks of partner and senior vice president as fast as Jack Wiley has. The Wall Street guru thinks he has a great deal to set up as Arvan Chemicals is ripe for the taking. Jack approaches the Capitol Group with the opportunity to purchase Arvan to gain hold of their patent that enables the painting of polymer coating to make combat vehicles impenetrable.

    The company legally owning the product will make billions as the Pentagon will save so much more by not having as much replacement buys. The Capitol Group takes over Arvan; however harvesting the return on investment in a short turnaround proves unmanageable as the Pentagon investigates in order to find a civilian to take the incoming hit.

    The Capital Game will be short-listed as one of the best financial thrillers of the year. The key to this super tale is the deal as Brian Haig escorts the grateful reader through a critical path analysis leading to the project failure and the blame game as the top brass at the defense Department, Caldron Security and the Capitol Group need a fall guy to pin the tail onto the donkey. This is a winning suspense laden tale.

    Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2010

    capitol game, brian haig

    "The Capitol Game" by Brian Haig starts off with an American soldier and his group getting killed in a roadside explosion in Iraq. While wondering how the incident might have been prevented, Haig moves us to present day. An ambitious Wall Street businessman, Jack Wiley, thinks he's found the next billion dollar business-a company on the verge of bankruptcy whose founder has discovered a special type of polymer that makes military vehicles in addition to other transportation, virtually explosion-proof.

    Wiley tries to sell the idea to the wealthy Capitol Group-a company whose whole business is based on taking over companies and making them profitable. However, Wiley won't tell them any more details about the venture without being guaranteed a solid percentage of future income from the polymer and being charge of the takeover himself.

    The Capitol Group grows suspicious of Jack, and starts concocting ways of getting its greedy claws on the polymer while moving Jack to the side. Of course Jack is too smart for the games, even as he realizes his freedom is in severe danger.

    What I loved about this book is its hybrid of eye-opening details about the politics and business of many modern-day Wall Street powerhouses like The Capitol Group, as well as the thriller-like atmosphere set up by the engrossing plot. The action is unpredictable, as is Jack Wiley himself. The writing reminded me of some of John Grisham's finer works. Not surprising, since both authors relied on their backgrounds to come up with fascinating material. Overall, a very solid book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2010

    Brian Haig Has Done It Once Again

    There are three things that you can count on Brian Haig to do for you in each and every one of his novels: Enlighten You, Entertain You, and Enthrall You. And, with The Capitol Game, Brian has not only done it again (in spades) but he's actually managed to improved upon his brand. As the title suggests, his story is an ultra-fast-paced tale of double deal and dirty deal in the Shining City on the Hill, our nation's capitol.

    Jack Wiley is an ambitious young master of the universe who happens upon an opportunity that seems to be too good to be true and he decides to seize upon it. As Haig details the art of the deal, Jack enlists the Capitol Group, the world's largest and most secretive private equity firm, to be his partners in acquiring a small New Jersey chemical company that has developed a new product that could potentially land it the richest and most important Pentagon contract of all time and make the company's worth a thousand-fold what it is today.

    But, as Haig unfold his tale of unfriendly takeover - with an unfailing eye for detail and a verisimilitude that only a true insider could provide and a wit and style too few thriller writers are capable of - we come to realize that things that seem to be too good to be true often are, and we swept along trying to figure out exactly what the rules of the Capitol Game are and who exactly is in charge. This may well be one of the most entertaining thrillers since John Grisham's "The Firm" and far more timely!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Corporate Corruption Unchained

    The Capitol Game by Brian Haig

    One can only hope this is a fictionalized account of corporate corruption's impact on the legislative process.

    I found the book chilling as it seems entirely too realistic after reading any newspaper, electronic or otherwise. The plot could be gleaned out of any issue of the New York Times or Washington Post.

    Jack Wiley was just shy of being super heroic. His brilliant plan and it's execution leave you hanging at each chapters end, lusting for more. It is a difficult book to put down. The only thing I disliked is that it seems entirely too likely to be true.

    I highly recommend the book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    The capitol

    Please check in here and i will direct you to the nearest room! - hotel girl

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 19, 2013

    A small company has made the discovery of the decade, a kind of

    A small company has made the discovery of the decade, a kind of polymer to paint on army vehicles that repels explosives giving the vehicles armour equivalent to 30 inches of steel.

    Jack Wiley, a successful Wall street wheeler and dealer, proposes to a large company skilled at takeovers the acquisition of this small company. The company is in financial trouble. The potential earnings from the polymer through the Defense Department are astronomical. The very idea, while at first seems too good to be true, soon captures to imagination and exaggerates the greed of the leaders in this large company, The Capital Group.

    The scenarios that ensue from chapter to chapter paint a pictures of corporate and government corruption that boggles the mind. Who is to be believed? Is Jack another greedy corporate wolf? Is the Capital Group totally without a conscience? And when a young lawyer comes on the scene to investigate government corruption we wonder why motivates her.

    The story moves well and comes to a startling conclusion that leaves Washington wounded and wondering.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    The best

    Great read

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  • Posted August 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Grafting A New Game

    This is a well-meaning book highlight8ing the multitude of ways that our government encourages waste and fraud. The story is not particularly well-told, with the author being far too transparent in where he is going. The book reads more polemic than thriller, but is a worthy effort.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2010

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    Posted May 25, 2011

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    Posted July 16, 2013

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    Posted October 8, 2010

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    Posted April 17, 2011

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    Posted November 8, 2010

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    Posted April 9, 2011

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    Posted October 31, 2010

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    Posted August 10, 2010

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    Posted February 7, 2011

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    Posted February 10, 2011

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