Customer Reviews for

Cat's Eye

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Rebecca, 13, mesmerized

i thought that cat's eye was a marvellous book. it perfectly portrays the truth about young girls and the subtlety of their power games. I also thought this book had deep psychological undertones and if you dont concentrate you wont get the whole picture. Atwood has no ...
i thought that cat's eye was a marvellous book. it perfectly portrays the truth about young girls and the subtlety of their power games. I also thought this book had deep psychological undertones and if you dont concentrate you wont get the whole picture. Atwood has no trouble in engaging the reader.

posted by Anonymous on October 28, 2005

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

"Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood is about Elaine Risley

"Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood is about Elaine Risley who is an aging artist, and, similar to "A Prayer for Owen Meany," takes place when she is older and describes her childhood and experiences with a small group of girls, mainly focusing on the &qu...
"Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood is about Elaine Risley who is an aging artist, and, similar to "A Prayer for Owen Meany," takes place when she is older and describes her childhood and experiences with a small group of girls, mainly focusing on the "friend" Cordelia.

Elaine grew up in a less than conventional way, with a father who studied bugs and would have the family on the road often. Elaine finally was able to make friends (besides with her older brother, Stephen) when she was eight years old and moved to Toronto. The group of girls she became friends with, led by Cordelia, began to bully Elaine. Elaine was a pushover but did eventually gain some guts. I'll leave it at that since I don't want to give too much away.

Another similarity to "A Prayer for Owen Meany" occurs when Elaine experiences a near-death experience and is rescued by, who she perceives is the Virgin Mary. In general, "Cat's Eye" stays farther away from religious topics than "A Prayer for Owen Meany."

As Elaine grows up, she becomes a stronger individual and we learn about her love life, her children, and her moderately successful career as a painter.

This could probably be a mini spoiler alert, so don't finish this paragraph if you want to read the book yourself! I really did enjoy following Elaine's journey through her life, and with her relationships with her family, boyfriend, husband, and on to being a painter. However, I don't really understand the ending. Maybe I'm missing something, but to me, it was a well-written, interesting story about Elaine's trip to Toronto, while in the midst of this Toronto trip, she explains about her childhood. The book begins with her trip to Toronto and ends with her plane ride home.

Usually I would not recommend a book where I didn't like the ending, or where I thought the ending was lackluster. But I honestly did enjoy the book, just was unsatisfied with the ending.

posted by RebeccaScaglione on July 20, 2012

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    "Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood is about Elaine Risley

    "Cat's Eye" by Margaret Atwood is about Elaine Risley who is an aging artist, and, similar to "A Prayer for Owen Meany," takes place when she is older and describes her childhood and experiences with a small group of girls, mainly focusing on the "friend" Cordelia.

    Elaine grew up in a less than conventional way, with a father who studied bugs and would have the family on the road often. Elaine finally was able to make friends (besides with her older brother, Stephen) when she was eight years old and moved to Toronto. The group of girls she became friends with, led by Cordelia, began to bully Elaine. Elaine was a pushover but did eventually gain some guts. I'll leave it at that since I don't want to give too much away.

    Another similarity to "A Prayer for Owen Meany" occurs when Elaine experiences a near-death experience and is rescued by, who she perceives is the Virgin Mary. In general, "Cat's Eye" stays farther away from religious topics than "A Prayer for Owen Meany."

    As Elaine grows up, she becomes a stronger individual and we learn about her love life, her children, and her moderately successful career as a painter.

    This could probably be a mini spoiler alert, so don't finish this paragraph if you want to read the book yourself! I really did enjoy following Elaine's journey through her life, and with her relationships with her family, boyfriend, husband, and on to being a painter. However, I don't really understand the ending. Maybe I'm missing something, but to me, it was a well-written, interesting story about Elaine's trip to Toronto, while in the midst of this Toronto trip, she explains about her childhood. The book begins with her trip to Toronto and ends with her plane ride home.

    Usually I would not recommend a book where I didn't like the ending, or where I thought the ending was lackluster. But I honestly did enjoy the book, just was unsatisfied with the ending.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2005

    Rebecca, 13, mesmerized

    i thought that cat's eye was a marvellous book. it perfectly portrays the truth about young girls and the subtlety of their power games. I also thought this book had deep psychological undertones and if you dont concentrate you wont get the whole picture. Atwood has no trouble in engaging the reader.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2003

    A Gem

    Never before has the pain and laughter of childhood been illustrated with such unique and yet accurate detail, at least for this reader. Atwood¿s writing is impeccable as she weaves a past-and-present story with fluidity and style, and ingeniously blends dark humor into serious themes. The novel is both poignant and bitingly funny, thanks to Atwood¿s insight, wit, and her ability to create characters who are hauntingly alive. An outstanding reflection on the consequences of human behavior.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    THOUGHT PROVOKING

    A great blend of science, art and chatacters to care for as the reflection occur
    I am grateful to be reading this at fifty or much would be blurred
    She writes paintings you can see and smell that linger on tje page
    Thank you for an inspiring that has given rise to forgive

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Another great story from Margaret

    Another great story from Margaret

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2006

    Cat's Eye

    Notice the simularities between this novel and 'The Bell Jar' Sylvia Plath. Also references to King Lear (Cordelia, Perdie, Mirrie) and Macbeth. Much sybolism relating to twins, lenses, mirors and eyes. Mrs Smeath, Grace, her sisters, Aunt Mildred and Mrs Lumley all wear glasses..are they short sighted?? Throughly enjoyable, although i found the paintings a little confusing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2006

    girl on the run

    Cat¿s Eye: girl on the run This novel reminded me of Girl Interrupted. Elaine, the protagonist, could be Susanna, and her school age ¿friend,¿ Cordelia¿Lisa. Elaine is a fiftyish female (don¿t call me an artist) painter: twice married, mother of two, with a very rich interior life that drives her to the brink of insanity. Susanna, in Susanna Kaysen¿s memoir, was diagnosed as having a borderline personality, and Lisa as having an anti-social personality. The labels fit Atwood¿s characters. The heroine says she was a happy girl until she moved to Toronto at the age of nine, where she attaches herself to the very charismatic Cordelia, who subsequently buries alive her neurotic ¿friend.¿ When Cordelia abandons Elaine in a frozen creek, leaving her for dead¿Elaine breaks the spell, and moves towards independence. She continues this quest for freedom throughout her life¿rejecting God, and her father¿s script for her (that of a scientist) for that of The Artist (painter). What about Mother? She rejects that role, too, of complicit housewife. Elaine, throughout, struggles for freedom and identity, but lands in a world of alienation and confusion, fertile ground for an artist. Predictably, she is seduced by her ¿Life Drawing¿ professor, but throws him off, only to attach herself to a wild, polygamous, peer artist who impregnates her. Unable to communicate other than through her painting, Elaine listens to an ethereal voice and attempts to kill herself, cutting her wrists with her husband¿s Exacto knife. By chance (?), Elaine catches a break when her socially egregious paintings elicit outrage from the community, thus ¿arriving¿ as an artist. This allows her to ditch her eccentric (now) husband and flee to Vancouver to start over. Having applied the ubiquitous geographic cure to no avail, Elaine tries the talking cure¿but she can¿t talk about, or remember, her childhood, which the shrink thinks holds the key. Throughout this disjointed journey, Atwood treats us to the fascinating dream world, adventures and musings of Elaine, who it seems, suffers from identity confusion and concludes that those who care¿lose¿so it is far better to remain unaffiliated. I find interesting Atwood¿s suggestion that perhaps it¿s the names people are given that determines their fate. Elaine wonders if Cordelia had had a different name, she might have fared better. In a later novel, Atwood repeats this premise, having her female characters intentionally change their names to better suit who they think they are, or want to be. In Cat¿s Eye, Elaine¿s brother, who she worships, is named Stephen (the first Christian martyr) and is murdered by terrorists. I wonder ¿ Margaret is a name of many names ¿ and Atwood, who uses the pseudonym O.W. Toad ¿ might just be on to something. This is fiction at its finest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2003

    Catseye

    After re-reading catseye, 2 years on from my original school project, I found that it is still as interesting and intricate the second time around. Although it has quite a slow start, he story progresses evenly, without leaving pockets of confusion in the readers mind or dwelling for too long on a given subject. Characters are well developed and Atwood could easily write a complimentary novel about Cordelia's life and side of the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2003

    Jen, OAC Student, Ontario Canada

    All in all, it wasn't bad... but it wasn't good either. I felt that her childhood experiences were compelling-- pathos was felt for the characters. The character change, the power change in Cordelia and in Elaine, was interesting, but I felt that much more explination was needed and that the ending was a dissapointment. Not bad, but not good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2002

    Not that great

    I had to read this book for a project.After talking about it with the group I was working with I found out the only people that really liked this book were those that were into art. I didn't like it at all but hey, that's just my opinion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2001

    Original and inovative

    Cat's eye is confusing at the beginning, but once the reader gets into the story, he/she is bound to love it. The writing technique and skills are amazing. The author manages to refer to both the present and the past without losing the atmospere. I just loved the book. The relationships between women are very detailed and realistic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2001

    Gripping... Compelling... hard to put down

    I thought Cat's Euye was an excellent book, to which many can relate. Although the beginning is a bit slow and hard to get into, towards the middle, you won't want to put the book down. I felt that the events occurring during Elaine's childhood are depicted without exageration, having experienced similar treatment myself. A compelling, suspenseful read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2001

    Pathetic - hard to follow

    Atwood's book, Cat's Eye, is easily one of the worst I have ever read. We were made to read it for a school text in English, and can see no reason to inflict the same torture on the other students. It is hard to understand and has nothing to which people can relate to...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    Ivy

    ((POST!)) "Thank you!" She said with tears. "I have to find my family!" She said giving Ariel a hug. "Until we meet again." Ivy dissapeared.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    A riel POST POST POST

    M e too! I freed Ivy once from a brutal master. I can finally set her free. Ivy, you are now free to go back to our family. I will always be your sister, though I'm not your blood sister. POST POST POST

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    Maya

    Ariel if shes your sister take her. I wanted them to have freedom.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    Leaders den

    Crystalclan

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2013

    Safire

    Sighs then walks away "look i like you and you are rhe only one that i want but like you said none of that matters now" walks to her gass area and her sadness makes her a white tiger again

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2013

    Her last straight novel before going scifi?

    A good read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    A charcter for the book .

    Shadenight . Haley . No . Girl . A cheerful girl with red hair and green eyes . At her first birthday Lady Greythorn came . Shr knew Ana and Haley would become best friends . So she piut a curse on her . This baby will be cursed . She can kill just by thinking and cannot die . And she will beable to fly when at will . It is curse not a gift . Goodbye . (I love kitty news )

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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