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Chanticleer and the Fox

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    Chanticleer and the Fox

    ¿Chanticleer and the Fox,¿ an adaptation of the ¿Nun's Priest's Tale¿ from ¿The Canterbury Tales¿, is by Geoffrey Chaucer with adaptations and illustrations done by Barbara Cooney. This book was published in 1958 and won the Caldecott Medal in 1959. Chaucer was born in 1340 and died in 1400. He is a well-known English poet, and still retains the position as the most significant poet to write in Middle English. Cooney was born on August 6, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York and died on March 14, 2000. Cooney attended Smith College where she received her B.A degree. She was the author and illustrator of more than 100 children books as well. ¿Chanticleer and the Fox¿ is a delightful story about a rooster named Chanticleer who is owned by a sweet, poor widow and her two young daughters. Chanticleer was a fine rooster who had seven hens. The hen that held the heart of Chanticleer was Demoiselle Partlet. Chanticleer and his seven hens were laying together one day sound asleep, when all of a sudden Chanticleer began to groan. Demoiselle Partlet heard Chanticleer groaning and asked him what was wrong. He told her that he had a troubled dream where he was caught by a threatening creature, but Demoiselle Partlet told him not to be afraid of such a dream. After their talk, Chanticleer and his seven wives, leaving their rafter, went to walk around the yard. They were filled with happiness and singing merrily until a sorrowful event occurred. A sly fox approached Chanticleer, and Chanticleer was very frightened until the fox spoke to him. The fox told Chanticleer, ¿The reason I came was only to listen to you sing,¿ and he told Chanticleer that he wanted to hear if he could sing as good as his father could. So, Chanticleer closed his eyes and crowed very loudly. At that very second, the sly fox grabbed Chanticleer by his throat and carried him towards the woods. Chanticleers hens started to cry for help once they saw Chanticleer was captured. Will Chanticleer escape, will he be rescued, or will he be gone forever? I really enjoyed this book. It is not only a simple and delightful tale, but it also has a moral lesson as well. It teaches a child to not trust flattery, and it also teaches a child to not trick others. The illustrations follow the story very well and Cooney selected a perfect selection of colors. The book also includes Middle English and rhyming, and I think this also makes the book enjoyable to read. This books reading level is ages 4-8 (Kindergarten to second grade). To me, this book is appropriate for children of all ages, even adults. Chaucer, Geoffrey. Cooney, Barbara. Chanticleer and the Fox. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1958.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2006

    Do you like to receive compliments? Have you ever heard of compliments getting someone into trouble?

    That is exactly what happened to the main character in this story. This is the story of Chanticleer, a rooster who was owned by a kind old widow and two little girls. Chanticleer was a fine rooster who had seven hens. His favorite was Demoiselle Partlet. Chanticleer was troubled by a dream in which he was caught by a strange creature. Demoiselle Partlet told him to not be afraid of such dreams. With that Chanticleer led the hens down from their roost and they merrily began to parade around and sing. While in this happy state a stealthy fox approached Chanticleer and began to engage Chanticleer in a conversation. By flattery, the fox tricked Chanticleer into singing with his eyes closed. The fox promptly captured Chanticleer and carried him away into the woods. The hens, along with the hogs, cows, sheep, little girls and the old woman ran after them in pursuit. Chanticleer then engaged the fox in conversation and when the fox opened his mouth to speak, Chanticleer escaped and flew into a tree. The fox tried to get Chanticleer to come down. Chanticleer had learned his lesson and refused by saying, ¿Nay then. Never again shall your flattery get me to sing with my eyes closed. For he who closes his eyes when he should watch, God let him never prosper¿. The widow said, ¿That is the result of trusting in flattery¿. I enjoyed reading this fable which was adapted from the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. The Old English phrases may present comprehension difficulties for young readers. The moral of the story about not trusting in flattery is a good lesson for readers of all ages.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    Review

    Barbara Cooney was born in Brooklyn, New York. She was author and illustrator of more than 100 books for children. Mrs. Cooney died in Portland, Maine on March 10, 2000, at the age of eighty-three. Chanticleer And The Fox received the Caldecott Medal in 1958. Chanticleer And The Fox was adapted from the Nun¿s priest¿s Tale from The Canterbury Tales. It is about a rooster, Chanticleer, which belonged to a widowed woman and her daughters. One night he had a dream that he was in danger. The next day after talking to his wife, he was no longer scared. Later that day, a fox came to the hedges where Chanticleer and his wives usually go. The fox tricked Chanticleer into stretching out his neck, closing his eyes, and singing. Once Chanticleer did this, the fox grabbed him by the throat. Chanticleer¿s wives began making noises, and every human and animal on the farm went after the fox.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2007

    Chanticleer and the Fox

    I enjoyed reading this fable. I also enjoyed the pictures. There was a little color on each page. Barbara Cooney done a wonderful job with this story. This was taken from the 'Nun's Priest's Tale' in the Canterbury Tales. The entire time I read it I was taken back to the Medieval times. I saw the rooster as a knight. The book teaches a very important lesson, Don't trust in flattery. The rooster could sing beautifully. He was the best around. Then one night he has this dream that he was in danger. Partlet told him that he cannot be a coward. So he ignored the dream and then came the fox. His dream was awakened. Will the fox out smart him? Cooney, Barbara. Chanticleer and the Fox. NY: Thomas Y. Crowell Company. 1958.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2006

    College Review for Class

    Ever got yourself into trouble because you where tricked to do something? That¿s just what happens in this 1958 Caldecott children¿s picture book, ¿Chanticleer and the Fox.¿ Chanticleer is a merry rooster who lives with a poor widow and her two daughters. Chanticleer lived in the yard, fenced all around with sticks. For crowing there is no equal in all the land. His voice is merrier than the merry organ that plays in church, and his crowing from his resting place is more trustworthy than a clock. One day a sly fox trick him by saying, ¿The reason I came was only to listen to you sing.¿ So, Chanticleer began to crow loudly when the fox grads Chanticleer while his eyes are closed. Once Chanticleer is able to get away from the fox the fox says, ¿I did it without evil intention.¿ This book is a great book for teaching children about being tricked by others. The author of this book, Barbara Cooney was born in Brooklyn, New York. She was author and illustrator of more than 100 books for children. Mrs. Cooney died in Portland, Maine on March 10, 2000, at the age of eighty-three. Cooney, Barbara. Chanticleer and the Fox. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1958

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2006

    chanticleer and the fox

    Chanticleer and the Fox is a fable about a crow who gets tricked and flattered by a fox! It is actually adapted from The Canterbury Tales. I really liked the book because it had a lesson behind it that taught children not to trust everyone or everything. The fox tricks him by saying, ¿The reason I came was only to listen to you sing.¿ The fox grabs the rooster while he has his eyes closed. After Chanticleer worked his way out of the fox¿s mouth the fox says, ¿I did it without evil intention.¿ However, Chanticleer didn¿t take his word for it. This book is a great book for 3rd-5th grades. It teaches them a wonderful lesson that they can use for years to come. Barbara Cooney was born in Brooklyn, New York, but often spent her summers in Maine with her grandmother. She majored in art history in college and later regretted this decision. She didn¿t consider herself a very skillful artist. She won the Caldecott medal in 1959 for her writing and her illustrations. Cooney, Barbara. Chanticleer and the Fox. Thomas Y. Crowell Company: New York, 1958.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2003

    Don't Lose your Head to Flattery

    A rooster learns the danger of following flattery, as he loses his judgement and nearly his life. (By the way, the reviews above have somehow mixed-up this book with an entirely different one.)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2002

    Gorgeous illustrations

    the annotations and reviews are incorrect...someone has mixed two review together...Barbara Clooney's is taken from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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