Customer Reviews for

The Children's Blizzard

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Little House on the Prairie meets the Best of the Weather Channel

I loved the two-sided aspect of this book. This is the gripping tale of real American families facing an unreal situation on the prairies. The story is woven through the fascinating account of the development of weather technology and the American weather servic...
I loved the two-sided aspect of this book. This is the gripping tale of real American families facing an unreal situation on the prairies. The story is woven through the fascinating account of the development of weather technology and the American weather service. Laskin shows tender and thoughtful attention to both of his subjects and particular care to the places where they meet. This is not simply a book about weather - it's more of a portrait of how weather interacts with people and shapes their lives. A wonderful book.

posted by Anonymous on June 21, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Interesting read - offensive summation

The author's extensive research permeates this book with intricate details on freezing bodies, politics of the Signal Corps, and first-hand accounts to make this an important read. Interesting, mo mention of the Native Americans during this tragedy. In his bio, the auth...
The author's extensive research permeates this book with intricate details on freezing bodies, politics of the Signal Corps, and first-hand accounts to make this an important read. Interesting, mo mention of the Native Americans during this tragedy. In his bio, the author reveals "I have never lived on the American Prairie"; made obvious by the ending comments. He says "Children were the unpaid workforce of the prairie, the hands that did the work no one else had time for or stomach for." He also quotes a NYT op-ed page which concludes that one of the greatest mistakes in American History was the "scheme" to settle the Great Plains. Mr. Laskin concurs that the blizzard of 1888 was an early sign of that mistake. Regardless of how these pioneers came here, be it false promises or lies of abundance, they came with a work ethic and strong belief to make a life out of nothing. If this author had been lucky enough to be a descendant of these pioneers, he would have heard wonderful stories of creative games, family, Church, and yes even hard work. A work ethic that continues today in the people of the Great Plains. If he had been blessed to be a part of this culture, I think he would have offered a different spin on the topic. Its unfortunate to summarize this amazing story of human perseverance as a mistake.

posted by NatNB on March 15, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    What!

    What is all of this garbage! This is not a chatting site!
    GOSH!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    Silverflight

    *looks at her leader* do u think it would b following the warrior code though?

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2007

    The pioneers weren't all this dumb...

    This book asserts that most pioneers were idiots, and that the archaic weather detection service of the day was remiss in not warning them. My question is, how could they have warned them? The weather service could only warn those in town, and virtually no one, and I mean, NO ONE in town died. On the plains there was absolutely no way that the weather service could have reached the myriad family farms. The truth is, less than one tenth of one percent of the population of the plains died on that day in 1888, because virtually everyone stayed home. And the author goes into a bizzarre rant at the end in which he basically says the blizzard led to the ruin of the great plains, which it didn't. Life went on--it still goes on out here on the flats, and unlike the incredibly stupid subjects of this book, we know how to stay indoors during a whiteout.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1