Customer Reviews for

Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Home and Heartbreak

The New York Times bestseller Adeline Yen Mah writes her compelling story of heartbreak. Chinese Cinderella: A True Story of an Unwanted Daughter shows how she goes through hard times and tries to stay strong. Adeline Yen Mah is born into a family who neglects and hurts...
The New York Times bestseller Adeline Yen Mah writes her compelling story of heartbreak. Chinese Cinderella: A True Story of an Unwanted Daughter shows how she goes through hard times and tries to stay strong. Adeline Yen Mah is born into a family who neglects and hurts her physically and emotionally. Her aunt and grandparents are the only ones who believe in her and show their love to her. Mah’s stepmother, Niang, hates her and tries to keep Adeline from having a life outside her home. Her rewards and prizes from school won’t help her family love her. In fact, they dislike her more and more every time she comes home with one. Her siblings take her things and hurt her. Killing her duckling, PLT, and insulting her in front of her family is only the surface of the hard things Yen Mah has to go through. Her father and stepmother send Adeline to different schools but she still is tied to her home, hoping for a letter from her family. Through torment and sadness, Adeline tries to find herself and the world around her. Throughout the novel, the author tells her story through her own eyes. She tells the reader to be strong and that we are all special and unique. She stresses how important it is to be truthful, loyal, and to have a talent you share with the world. Her moral is to be the best person you can and to enjoy even the little things in life. Although her life was not easy, she believes that she should show people how she can be strong and determined to pull through. Adeline Yen Mah writes in an interesting way to pull readers in. She tells her story as if she has something to prove. Adeline remembers her life and tries to write about it. The reader can understand what she went through and feel the pain that she had to encounter. Most readers can relate to Yen Mah and her story in some way. This book is a heart-felt memoir that touches anyone. I enjoyed how it makes you react to the novel. It is told in so much detail that you actually feel like you are in the story. The story moves you before you even read all the way through. It's never difficult to understand what the author goes through. Some situations are vague and lack detail but when you read the book you understand why. When Adeline Yen Mah describes her boarding school in Tianjin, it is described in little detail. She improves the book by trying to let the reader understand how alone she feels and help us create our own images in our mind. Mah tells a story of love and acceptance. Readers will connect with the memoir and believe in change for innocent people and their families. Thanks to Adeline Yen Mah, hope and healing is a place in the world for everyone.

posted by limegreenlvr101 on January 29, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Re¿e

Dis book is frickin good no lies

posted by 15217477 on August 22, 2012

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 304 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 16
  • Posted January 29, 2012

    Home and Heartbreak

    The New York Times bestseller Adeline Yen Mah writes her compelling story of heartbreak. Chinese Cinderella: A True Story of an Unwanted Daughter shows how she goes through hard times and tries to stay strong. Adeline Yen Mah is born into a family who neglects and hurts her physically and emotionally. Her aunt and grandparents are the only ones who believe in her and show their love to her. Mah’s stepmother, Niang, hates her and tries to keep Adeline from having a life outside her home. Her rewards and prizes from school won’t help her family love her. In fact, they dislike her more and more every time she comes home with one. Her siblings take her things and hurt her. Killing her duckling, PLT, and insulting her in front of her family is only the surface of the hard things Yen Mah has to go through. Her father and stepmother send Adeline to different schools but she still is tied to her home, hoping for a letter from her family. Through torment and sadness, Adeline tries to find herself and the world around her. Throughout the novel, the author tells her story through her own eyes. She tells the reader to be strong and that we are all special and unique. She stresses how important it is to be truthful, loyal, and to have a talent you share with the world. Her moral is to be the best person you can and to enjoy even the little things in life. Although her life was not easy, she believes that she should show people how she can be strong and determined to pull through. Adeline Yen Mah writes in an interesting way to pull readers in. She tells her story as if she has something to prove. Adeline remembers her life and tries to write about it. The reader can understand what she went through and feel the pain that she had to encounter. Most readers can relate to Yen Mah and her story in some way. This book is a heart-felt memoir that touches anyone. I enjoyed how it makes you react to the novel. It is told in so much detail that you actually feel like you are in the story. The story moves you before you even read all the way through. It's never difficult to understand what the author goes through. Some situations are vague and lack detail but when you read the book you understand why. When Adeline Yen Mah describes her boarding school in Tianjin, it is described in little detail. She improves the book by trying to let the reader understand how alone she feels and help us create our own images in our mind. Mah tells a story of love and acceptance. Readers will connect with the memoir and believe in change for innocent people and their families. Thanks to Adeline Yen Mah, hope and healing is a place in the world for everyone.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    PREPARE TO GET TISSUES !!!!I

    So a friend recommended this book because i didnt know what to reas for the summer . So i said what do i have to lose so i got it and it pleasently surprised me that i loved the book ALOT . The one thing that surprised me was i dont really cry for books , but this OMG did i cry during this book . Over all two big thunbs up !!!!!! :)))

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2012

    Faith Kpolie

    I read the full book and am excited that I can buy it! I love this book, and for that person who rated three stars and said "Really.", This is great read. I also want to tell you guys to "read/play before you post" because some people just leave reviews when they haven't even read it yet

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2013

    Best Book

    Read in two days c: It was surely in my top 5 of my most delicate favorite books c: would toatally lend/share this book to my friends. I actually throughout the book... at each moment would be able to connect/relate to the author c: And I liked that... Best book ever (:

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2012

    Best book

    This is my favorite book!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2012

    chinese cinderella review

    Chinese cinderella is the true story about a young girl who grew up tormented and hated. Always thinking that her mother died because of her, when it was really just the birth.
    It's a really good book, that'll make you think!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 19, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Truly Unwanted

    This book is such a safe one, but written in a phenomenal way. Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah is a autobiography written from her early childhood through the age of fourteen. Adeline - a gifted young girl who is shunned and hated by her family - is seen as bad luck because her mother dies shortly after giving birth to her. Her father re-marries and her step-mother(Niang) is a stylish yet cruel woman who seems to hate Adeline more than her siblings do. Not to mention that her siblings do some really cruel things to her. Adeline's father has no power in the house and he's no resort to Adeline because he doesn't even remember her name or birthday.<BR/><BR/>Adeline's only resort is her Aunt Baba, her Ye Ye(Grandfather), and her Nai Nai(Grandmother). Adeline is left out from family activity and works hard to be accepted by her father. Adeline's entire life has been a challenge and this book shows just the beginning of it. If you've ever felt unwanted, think again.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Amazing

    I have to day it has been by far ny favorite book! No doubt that anyone who reads this book will love it. Growing up cinderella had always been my favorite and if it woulnt of been on my summer reading list i wouldve missed out on a great book. It is an easy read heart warming and beautiful book. I will honestly say i actually cryed reading this story. Like someone would watching a chick flick. Read this book you wont regret it!! (:

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2011

    Thumbs up!!!

    I really like this book because it tells how she was raised and treated but its really sad. Has anyone read the second book?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2011

    Good sample

    I have read the sample, and i will definetly get the full book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2011

    EXTREMELY SAD! NO OTHER LIKE IT

    This book is about a chinese girl who is unloved! If you do not like sad books then i do not recomend it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2010

    A Story of an Unwanted Daughter

    Adeline Yen Mah lived her childhood as an unwanted daughter. Her father ignored her, forgetting her name and birthday. Her step-mother was cruel and abusive, and her siblings blamed her for her mother's death.
    In her memoir, Adeline describes her childhood in China. This beautifully crafted memoir describes the pain she suffered from her family and shows the political changes of China at the same time.
    This was an excellent novel and a quick read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    Lives up to its Name

    My eleven-year-old daughter read Chinese Cinderella first, then passed it on to some friends, and because I sometimes read literature for children, told me I had to read it next.

    The following review is from my blog about books, Suko's Notebook.

    When I write book reviews, although they contain my opinions, I try to keep from going overboard emotionally. I'm not a journalist, just reporting the facts--but neither am I an overly emotional writer, or person. However, reading Chinese Cinderella: The Secret Story of an Unwanted Daughter was quite an emotional experience for me. I often felt on the verge of tears, and was completely outraged by the way this poor child was treated, as a nonentity in a rich family. It was unbearable to me, that this innocent, gifted child was ignored, mistreated, and made to feel bad about just about everything.

    Published in 1999, Chinese Cinderella is a beautifully written memoir by Adeline Yen Mah. The book describes her early experiences growing up in China during World War II, and is a revised version of part of her autobiography, Falling Leaves.

    Poor Adeline! Her mother died soon after giving birth to her, and the family shuns her and regards her as bad luck. After her father remarries, she receives constant abuse from her stepmother "Niang" (the Chinese word for mother) and siblings. Although she's an outstanding student at school, at home she's made to feel as if she doesn't exist, at the complete mercy of a cold, despicable stepmother. She's forced to become independent at a very young age, walking to school and back by herself in the worst weather. Her father's guilty of neglecting her, and allowing his second wife to be cruel and unjustly punitive towards her.

    Her saving grace is her scholastic ability and intelligence, and having one person in her life who believes in her, Aunt Baba. In spite of a very difficult upbringing, Adeline is able to triumph over her past and eventually attends medical school. Chinese Cinderella lives up to it's name, and although it's shockingly sad, it's also a book about hope and the resiliency of the human spirit, about reaching dreams in spite of the worst possible circumstances. I'd like to read Adeline Yen Mah's full autobiography, Falling Leaves, an international bestseller published in 1997.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2009

    Chinese Cinderella

    Chinese Cinderella is a book about this girl named Adeline. Her mother died as she was born. So now most of her family thinks she is the cause of her mother¿s death. Adeline goes throughout her life being mistreated and partly ignored. There are only a few people in her family who know that she is not the cause of her mother¿s death. They are her aunt Baba, grandpa Yeye, and Third Brother. Now she has to live with all her brothers, sisters, and a mean step mother. <BR/><BR/>*I liked how her aunt Baba kept all her report cards and kept them locked in this box where she keeps all her valuables. Then every time Adeline feels down and discouraged Baba shows her the grades and tells her how proud of her she is and how good she is at school. One thing that I liked was when Adeline had a pet duck, she named it and took care of it as if it was her own child. She named it Precious Little Treasure but its nick name was PLT. PLT was the only other person that Adeline cared about, she fed her everyday, slept with her, kept her well but then a sad day came. One day Big Brother took PLT and let their dog Jackie plays with it but then PLT got hurt and ended up dying. Adeline was really sad. Then another thing I disliked was when every time Adeline got a award or something special from school her dad would be proud of her but her siblings would get mad n hate her. Like¿..

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2008

    A reviewer

    This book is mostly about a young girl who has a huge family but none of them liked her. Since she has a ton of sivlings, and her father got remarried,and she is not treated very well at all. Everyone in her family treats her like it's her fault their real mother died. Her stepmom favors her children over everyone else, so dose her father. I think the author does a pretty good job of engaging the reader, but sometimes I felt like the book was getting boring. Like when all her brothers and sisters got a duckling was fun to read about, but then something happens to it and the author goes back to telling about how she's neglected. I liked reading about her friend, who is very athletic and is the top athlete in her school. This kind of sounded like me. I don't really get why she went away when she got kicked out because she should've stayed at her friend's house. I think homeless people would enjoy this book because then they know that there are other people out in the world that can have it worse than them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2013

    Loved it

    This was the best book ive evrer read

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    Quick read, informative, good book.

    Chinese Cinderella is historically informative, and highly emotional. This is not a book to love, yet a must read to see how disturbing some people live, and yet survive.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2013

    Left alone in a school completely unloved and unwanted by her f


    Left alone in a school completely unloved and unwanted by her family, Adeline Yen finds happiness from within
    and clings onto the hope that she might be worth something someday. The autobiography, Chinese Cinderella,
    is written by Adeline Yen Mah about her experiences growing up in boarder schools without love or appreciation
    from neither her father nor her step-mother.  It takes place in World War II meaning there are dangers for Adeline
    where she currently lives, Tianjin. Moreover, she remains the only girl left at the catholic school, left to fend for
    herself in the middle of a war. I was shocked at the ignorance and unkindness of the parents in this book, and I
     enjoyed the surprising ending.Teenage girls would fall in love at the tragic lifestyle Adeline is forced to endure. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    Leaffall

    Hayy I would like to join this clan.
    So Rubystar as it seems you are the leader may I join? I am a strong warrior and I'm very loyal.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Good book!

    Amazing book! It was very moving. Follow the childhood of unwanted, mistreated daughter Adeline Yen Mah and watch as she does greatness.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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