Customer Reviews for

Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution--A History from the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted April 30, 2009

    Eye Opening

    The title is a bit misleading. The contents of the book, however, explain it and it's a bit different than what you might expect. To me, it gives a better understanding of protestantism and what it lacks as opposed to catholic christianity. But then maybe I'm a bit biased? In any event, even though it's more of a textbook, it's quite readable for a non-student. It can be read at a more leisurely pace than the usual "blockbuster" types of popular books, thus helping one get imbued with more insight into one's fellow travellers in this life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 31, 2008

    Individual Interpretation

    In response to a rather misleading review¿<BR/>January 23: Apparently you have not read the book, and are simply misinterpreting the overview on this page. McGrath is not saying we shouldn¿t read the Bible on our own, but instead should listen to some hierarchical church authority.<BR/> In fact he argues just the opposite, that the dangerous, powerful, vital strength of the Protestant movement is that it embraces the idea that all believers have the right to read and interpret the Bible for themselves. This is a right McGrath defends and celebrates, even as he points to certain dangers from an in-house perspective.<BR/><BR/>That aside, I would highly recommend this brilliant work. McGrath writes in a way that is deep and extremely well informed, but at the same time accessible and engaging. Its 560 pages flew by as the narrative of the book will grab a hold of anyone with even the slightest interest in the formation and history of the Protestant movement, as well as challenging thoughts about its future.<BR/><BR/>Buy it, read it, you will not regret a moment of the time or a cent of the cost.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2008

    Let's stick to the subject

    For heaven's sake, this was supposed to be a review of a book, not an excuse for another anti-Catholic rant. Since you must, please note: The first English translation of the Bible was (gasp!) Catholic. Catholics have always been encouraged to read the Bible. The Catholic Church does, however, insist on actually following the Biblical maxim (see St. Paul) that 'Scripture is of no private interpretation.' Now, can we get back to the premise of the book? Please?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2008

    Ridiculous

    Arguing against the idea that everyone should read the Bible is basically stating that we should all just nod and bow to whatever spews forth from the Catholic Church, which has been shown to be filled with man-made rules and decadency that has nothing to do with the Word. Power by controlling the ignorant is this book's message? Did God really give us his Word so that only a select few may understand it? The Roman Catholic Church is not quite as corrupt as it was back then, so the 'movement' this book refers to has little consequence. If making others angry is the goal of this book in order to make sales with controversy, it may succeed.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1