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Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

This is Buchanan's most important book to date. Buchanan has brought to light certain illuminating facts which have been buried under a rubbish heap of political correctness. These facts explain how the West lost the world as a result of the war, and why America is fac...
This is Buchanan's most important book to date. Buchanan has brought to light certain illuminating facts which have been buried under a rubbish heap of political correctness. These facts explain how the West lost the world as a result of the war, and why America is facing a deluge which it may not survive. Among the suppressed facts are these 1) that England and France had advanced knowledge of the Soviet invasion of Eastern Poland on the same day that Germany invaded, precipitating World War II (the revelation of this fact almost brought a halt to the Nuremberg Trials) 2) the defection of two million Russian soldiers to the Axis side during the war 3) the fact that FDR's closest advisor at the Yalta Conference was a Soviet Agent, and the first Secretary General of the UN (Alger Hiss.) As De Gaulle said 'Two nations were defeated in World War II, but every nation in Europe lost.' And as William Jennings Bryan once said 'Truth crushed to earth will rise again!' Pat Buchanan's new book will prove to be the most influential book since 'Uncle Tom's Cabin.' Congratulations, Pat!

posted by Anonymous on May 28, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

A lot going on here

What do say about a book where "poor" Adolf Hitler is just a mere pawn of Churchill and Stalin, especially the latter. While the author makes an interesting argument regarding Britain's guarantee of war to Poland, it is hard to determine what the real point Buchanan is ...
What do say about a book where "poor" Adolf Hitler is just a mere pawn of Churchill and Stalin, especially the latter. While the author makes an interesting argument regarding Britain's guarantee of war to Poland, it is hard to determine what the real point Buchanan is trying to make. Is it that it would have been best for Britain to ignore the invasion of Poland and then standby and watch the Nazis and Soviets fight? Assuming Germany had won, the author states that Hitler's intent was to ensure a blockade would never hurt Germany again and he would have had the grain and oil riches of Russia. France and England time would have come next and it is questionable if they would have been any more ready. Or, then may England should just let Hitler right the wrongs of 1918 and let him take back Belgium and parts of France. It is a historical fact that Stalin brought down his reign of terror to Eastern Europe after World War II. The question Buchanan should ask himself is what if Hitler invaded the Soviet Union in 1940 (through a conquered Poland) and Stalin had won? Would Poland's fate been any different? Might all of Germany come under his wing instead of a portion? No need for a Berlin Airlift.

Then there is Czechoslovakia. Hard to know what the author was suggesting. It seems that the Sudetenland germans should have been given to Austria or Germany (which they were never part of). What was the point of Czechoslovakia anyway afterall the Czechs represented only 47% of the country, which had never been a country before (gee, Pat ever study American History?)? At the same time, he speculates that it would have been better for the British to stay out and let the Germans try the Czech defences. Then, again, as Buchanan points out the Czech wouldn't have fought (confused yet?)

Buchanan also ignores the history of Japanese imperialism starting from the late 19th Century and instead blames the U.S. and Britain for disrespecting Japan (he also seems to forget that Japan attacked the U.S. first and that Hitler, not Roosevelt declared war first). Japan had its eye on China before, during and after its alliance with Britain and it had the means to push Britain out of Asia when it chose (Singapore? Hong Kong?). Buchanan also ignores native movements against colonialism and imperialism in regions such as India, IndoChina, China. Mao may have been a butcher, but he was not put into power because of Stalin or his army but by the Chinese people(Stalin wanted Mao to cut a deal with Chiang Kai Shek when Mao was ready to take all of China).

In his discourse about the U.S. not directly confronting the moves by the "communist monolith" perhaps he has conveniently forgot about Korea and Vietnam.

In the end, this book states the age old premise: What if the West had just let the Soviets and Nazis go at it. Would the world be a better place? Assuming someone would win (there was no mercy on the Eastern Front), who knows which devil The West would have to deal with, but the West would have had to live or fight with one or the other. At least the British Empire would have been saved, right?

posted by USC73 on August 15, 2009

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  • Posted November 2, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    History is Often the Sum of Many Tiny Mistakes

    When we examine history, we tend to only look at proximate causes. We tend to look only at the paths taken instead of the paths which could've been taken. Buchanan doesn't make that mistake. With incredible precision he dissects the dozens of small policy errors that led to both World Wars and the Holocaust. The most important lesson the book teaches is that nothing is inevitable, not the greatest tragedies or the most noble triumphs. Some way somehow a series of people make choices which determine the world's fate. That is the path Buchanan examines in this fascinating book. There may be some big questions raised, like what would've happened to Europe if we'd let Hitler and Stalin slug it out and never gotten involved, and some heroes may be tarnished. Buchanan does to Winston Churchill what many of today's scholars do to Lincoln and the Founding Fathers, but ultimately I recommend this book because it made me think, not only about choices made in the past but choices being made today. If we want to avoid future wars, we must examine why choices which seemed smart at the time were proved stupid in the future. On that basis, this is an important piece of scholarship as well as a fascinating read.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2008

    Magnificent, epochal work.

    For all the World War Two history buffs who have ever pondered such questions as 'Why the British Army was not annihilated at Dunkirk' or 'Why the Germans never built much of a Navy'... here is a book that provides extremely plausible explanations for these puzzles. Pat Buchanan's writing is lively, clear and smooth-flowing. He works from the most certain facts about the outcome of World War Two: That Great Britain lost her empire and became a small, second-rate island nation, that tens of millions of innocent people died in the maelstrom, and that the Communists came to rule Central and Eastern Europe in a brutal fashion that impoverished these unfortunate nations for decades. From these incontestable facts Pat Buchanan sifts history to see if it was all so necessary or unavoidable. His conclusion is that it was not unavoidable, and that the biggest blunderers were British leaders and most specifically Winston Churchill. Buchanan postulates that perhaps it would have been better to allow Hitler to continue expanding into eastern Europe and allowing Poland to fall, where it would have eventually been inevitable that a German-Russian war would have ensued - but not the massive War that instead engulfed the world. His exposition is that Communism would have been destroyed by this war and the Cold War averted. Buchanan also provides substantial evidence that these eastward movements represent Germany's true aim: To become the singular power of Eastern and Central Europe - and that world domination was not Hitler's true goal. This book's claims may be considered audacious and controversial by some, but the author has done his homework in backing them up. Pat Buchanan has provided an epochal book on the subject - this is a magnificent piece of work that will most likely generate study and debate for a long time.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is Buchanan's most important book to date. Buchanan has brought to light certain illuminating facts which have been buried under a rubbish heap of political correctness. These facts explain how the West lost the world as a result of the war, and why America is facing a deluge which it may not survive. Among the suppressed facts are these 1) that England and France had advanced knowledge of the Soviet invasion of Eastern Poland on the same day that Germany invaded, precipitating World War II (the revelation of this fact almost brought a halt to the Nuremberg Trials) 2) the defection of two million Russian soldiers to the Axis side during the war 3) the fact that FDR's closest advisor at the Yalta Conference was a Soviet Agent, and the first Secretary General of the UN (Alger Hiss.) As De Gaulle said 'Two nations were defeated in World War II, but every nation in Europe lost.' And as William Jennings Bryan once said 'Truth crushed to earth will rise again!' Pat Buchanan's new book will prove to be the most influential book since 'Uncle Tom's Cabin.' Congratulations, Pat!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2010

    Great book and definetily provocative

    Mr. Buchanan's work is really a must for anyone interested in the happenings of the 20th century european politics and in all the events that lead the world to world war I and the to world war II and in what the great powers and their leading statesment could have done diferently and changed the avents that eventually brought Hitler and then Stalin and theri dreafull legacy after the war and therefore all the calamity that befell europe and the world afterwards. A really grat work with carefull comentasies and reserch.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2012

    An interesting perspective....

    Buchanan provides another interesting perspective on the events that led up to WW1 and WW2. I think anyone who has read extensively on this period of history will appreciate this perspective even if there is some disagreement with the author's point of view.

    For the history buff this is a very engaging read.

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  • Posted February 17, 2011

    Highly recommended

    This book is another well researched, informative Buchanan book with his unique hard hitting style that makes his reading fascinating and very informative. I hope he soon writes another book so I can add it to the other Buchanan books that I have alread read and learned from.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 17, 2008

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    Posted March 16, 2009

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    Posted October 16, 2011

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