Customer Reviews for

Clapton: The Autobiography

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Eric Clapton

I thought the book Clapton was amazing. I learned a lot about Eric Clapton and his career. I found myself feeling badly for him with the drug addictions but inspired by how he overcame his addictions.

posted by 3534374 on May 9, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

CRINGE!

Witty, sexy, romantic, fun: that's how Pattie Boyd described Clapton in her memoirs, Wonderful Tonight. I didn't get it in her book and I really don't get it in Clapton's. He goes from weird to downright frightening, sober or drunk. I was already aware of Clapton's ghas...
Witty, sexy, romantic, fun: that's how Pattie Boyd described Clapton in her memoirs, Wonderful Tonight. I didn't get it in her book and I really don't get it in Clapton's. He goes from weird to downright frightening, sober or drunk. I was already aware of Clapton's ghastly views about women but was stunned by the depths of his demons, especially with respect to Boyd, his muse and whipping post. 'Clapton' makes me question the efficacy of the recovery movement because Sober Eric = Drunken Eric with all the same weird issues and a new batch of excuses. As another reviewer said he's now in a marriage that resembles the outcome of a contest. Despite years of AA, and an overwhelming tragedy, he isn't humbled enough to make amends for his many mistakes, including his racist outbursts in the 70's. I don't see the changed man he insists he is. Sorry, but a multimillionaire building a rehab for rich addicts doesn't impress me when he hasn't made amends to the people he directly hurt. My patience with the book and author wore thin fast. Too many gross descriptions of substance bingeing, too much self-serving recovery-speak, too many bimbos, and just too much freak show. Clapton's musical genius aside, he's led an embarrassing life and it makes for a cringe-inducing read.

posted by Anonymous on December 18, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2007

    CRINGE!

    Witty, sexy, romantic, fun: that's how Pattie Boyd described Clapton in her memoirs, Wonderful Tonight. I didn't get it in her book and I really don't get it in Clapton's. He goes from weird to downright frightening, sober or drunk. I was already aware of Clapton's ghastly views about women but was stunned by the depths of his demons, especially with respect to Boyd, his muse and whipping post. 'Clapton' makes me question the efficacy of the recovery movement because Sober Eric = Drunken Eric with all the same weird issues and a new batch of excuses. As another reviewer said he's now in a marriage that resembles the outcome of a contest. Despite years of AA, and an overwhelming tragedy, he isn't humbled enough to make amends for his many mistakes, including his racist outbursts in the 70's. I don't see the changed man he insists he is. Sorry, but a multimillionaire building a rehab for rich addicts doesn't impress me when he hasn't made amends to the people he directly hurt. My patience with the book and author wore thin fast. Too many gross descriptions of substance bingeing, too much self-serving recovery-speak, too many bimbos, and just too much freak show. Clapton's musical genius aside, he's led an embarrassing life and it makes for a cringe-inducing read.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2008

    Disappointed reader!

    Well I can repeat back almost every artist that inspired Mr. Clapton, but I can't tell you much about him besides the fact that he enjoyed drugs, women, and held a huge grudge against his mother. I feel disappointed I thought i'd really get an in depth read into his life, but honestly I still dont feel like this book is showing us the REAL Eric Clapton. Also his ghost writer wasn't that great, whoever it was skipped around from subject to subject, making it a unbearable read. The book seemed so fake, like he was just letting you know the surface, why write a book if your not going to pour yourself into, he should of stuck with interviews where its ok to be fake!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2007

    Diary of a 'Cruel, Vicious' Man

    'Cruel and vicious' is how Clapton describes himself, specifically, the day he threw wife Pattie Boyd out of their house for refusing to sleep with him after she learned his mistress was pregnant. If this is how Clapton treated Boyd -- indisputably, the great love of his life -- you can imagine his callous treatment of the multitudes of other women he bedded and discarded, and in some cases, got hooked on drugs and drink. Clapton notes the overdose death of his ex-fiancee with a smug 'It made me realize how lucky I am.' I guess she couldn't afford the pricey tab at Eric's Caribbean rehab. (You'd think he would have given her freebie admission, considering he's the guy who got her hooked on smack.) Clapton's treatment of women goes beyond chauvinism, beyond misogyny Eric Clapton is a sadist. Why am I writing about Clapton's mistreatment of women ad nauseam? Because he does. The woman Clapton thought was his sister was actually his mother, therefore, Clapton has been on a lifelong mission to punish every female in sight for his pregnant 15 year-old mother's 'betrayal.' It's page after page of loathsome confessions from a man with a perverse love for recounting his moral transgressions, yet who lacks any remorse for the damage he's inflicted. Clapton resents Boyd because her mere existence caused her to fall in love with him. He resents her for resisting his pleas to run off with him, then when she does, he resents her even more because he realizes he's not good enough for her. He demands Boyd join him on his drinking binges and then resents her for that. Eric resents Pattie for being so loyal to such a lout (him). Finally, Eric joins AA while Pattie joins Al-Anon. Happy ending, right? Wrong. Boyd is infertile and Clapton resents her for that, too, so he starts knocking up other women. Oh grow up, Eric! Clapton proves his new-found 'maturity' by comparison shopping for his next bride during a ménage a trois. Tellingly, he didn't propose to the winner until she was in her third trimester. (This guy is a homing pigeon for women with zero self-esteem.) Clapton is oblivious not only to how pathetically controlling he still is, but also to the fact that these concubines would never have competed for him -- a now middle-aged, grizzled sadsack -- if he weren't a wealthy rock star. I developed great respect for Pattie Boyd after reading her memoir. I now appreciate just how generously she treated Clapton in her book: she's said in interviews she omitted the graphic details of Clapton's abuse in her memoir. Turns out, Boyd didn't owe her ex-husband that enormous favor as he certainly never showed her any kindness. Clapton: The Autobiography is a confession without contrition from an arrested adolescent who never became a man because he wouldn't make the effort. I was going to give this two stars as some passages are very well-written, but this is a memoir, so it's character that counts and Clapton doesn't have any.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2010

    Eric Clapton

    I thought the book Clapton was amazing. I learned a lot about Eric Clapton and his career. I found myself feeling badly for him with the drug addictions but inspired by how he overcame his addictions.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2010

    Clapton

    This was an excellent fast read. Would recommend it to anyone interested in rock history.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2012

    Good read

    I found this book about my guitar hero very interesting .

    Clapton has had one hell of a life .

    I find myself feeling sad for Clapton . Broken as a child , he wandered thru life seemingly unable to function normally as an adult . From his substance abuse to his awful somewhat pathetic professional and romantic relationships . Hmm familiar .

    Clapton and I proved to have a lot in common. Including finding ourselves in AA . The best thing that ever happened to either of us . Like mine , his story takes a turn for the better.


    I find myself inspired by his continued commitment to helping others seek sobriety . A beautiful example of what we in the program should strive to do everyday .

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2012

    Wonderful read. Highly recommended to anyone who loves the blues

    Wonderful read. Highly recommended to anyone who loves the blues or Clapton.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 7, 2012

    GREAT STORY

    I BOUGHT THIS BOOK FOR MY SON. HE REALLY ENJOYED READING IT AND FOUND IT INTERESTING.HE SAID THAT IT IS A GOOD BOOK.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 7, 2011

    Classic Read

    Music biography books are my picks of poison. I've read them all and this is in my top 3!! Scott W - Hamilton, OH

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This STANDS up.

    I am writing this review a couple of years after I read the book. I have to tell you that this book has staying power with me. Especially after recently finishing Keith Richard's "Life". Clapton does not feel narrated. At least, not obviously so. He relates his life in clear and effective prose. Not prone to the rambles of others on this genre. I found it entertaining, and very easy to enjoy. He relates clearly what the drug and alcohol did to him. (As brilliant as he played on "The concert for Bangledesh", he remembers none of some of his finest work) He pulled no punches when he spoke of the pain and processes he overcame to face recovery. How could anyone express more clearly the torture he endured when he lost his son, Connor. I can easily recommend this tome to one who loves Clapton's music as well as anyone that loves a great biography. I think I love his music even more now that before I read his book. I hope you enjoy it too.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2009

    Derek's Dominion

    Sad life; sad choices; sad sense of self absorption and entitlement.
    Self-inflicted, artificial, "blues."

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 3, 2014

    I feel Eric Clapton is the luckiest person in the world. I was s

    I feel Eric Clapton is the luckiest person in the world. I was so disappointed in him after I read his book. I was shocked he was a drunk, druggie and cheater. His music didn't give him away. I thought he truly loved the woman he wrote "Wonderful tonight" and I felt so bad for what I thought was him and his wife when his son dies. It was all a farce. Yet, now he is married to the prettiest woman ever in his life and has three beautiful daughters with her. God is a forgiving God for sure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2014

    Pathetic

    If he has indeed come to his senses,then why does this thing seem like a thinly disguised attempt at bragging?
    When there is no reason....woman hater.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2013

    Lightkit's Biography

    Name: Lightkit <p>
    Age: 1 moon <p>
    Rank: Kit, idiot! <p>
    Mate: Kit, idiot! <p>
    Crush: Cranepaw <p>
    Family: Aspen; mom. Owlkit, Leaf; sisters. Darkkit; brother <p>
    Siggy: &#3333

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2013

    Rainkits bio

    Here at later date

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2013

    Insightful

    Great story. I wish Nook included the photos from the original book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    Eric Clapton has become a rock and roll/blues superstar. For ove

    Eric Clapton has become a rock and roll/blues superstar. For over forty years he has had a huge influence on other musicians. He is 
    indisputably one of the greatest guitarists of all times. Clapton was born in Surrey, England in 1945 to Patricia Molly Clapton but it was 
    his Grandmother Rose and her husband Jack Clapton who raised him. His autobiography chronicles his years with various blues and
    rock and roll bands including his early years with the John Mayall Band, Blind Faith, Cream, and Derek and the Dominos and ending
    with his days touring as a solo act. He was and continues to be instrumental in promoting the careers of other musicians. He also writes
    very candidly about the drug and alcohol addictions that haunted him for much of his life creating chaos in both his personal and
    professional life. A major theme throughout the book was the obstacles he had to overcome to &quot;beat&quot; these addictions and why he has
    put sobriety as his number one priority in life. Clapton's brutal honesty and &quot;no excuse&quot; approach to his addictions is shocking and at
    times tedious. The details he gives about his escapades leaves the reader wondering how he survived the early years of his career.
    His recollections of playing with other famous musicians give the reader insight into the life of a musician on the road and perhaps
    why it is so easy for them to turn to drugs, sex, and alcohol. It was particularly interesting to read about his relationship with Jimi Hendrix 
    and George Harrison. What is missing from this autobiography is how Clapton's reckless actions affected those around him. He has a 
    very self-centered and almost cavalier attitude about his behavior. If you're a Clapton fan, this is a &quot;must-read&quot; book. His words are 
    spoken from the heart. Blues fans and rock and roll fans will also enjoy this book. I would not, however, recommend this to those
    who are not music fans. At times, Clapton's amateur writing style becomes monotonous and gives the reader unnecessary information.
    Sometimes it reads like a diary written by an adventurous teenager. I would give the book an overall rating of 3 out of 5 stars. Other
    books that may be of interest to Clapton fans would be biographies written by Pete Townsend, Greg Allman and Ozzy Osbourne.    

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    Clapton: The Autobiography Eric Clapton has become a rock and ro

    Clapton: The Autobiography
    Eric Clapton has become a rock and roll/blues superstar. For over forty years, he has had a huge influence on other musicians. He is 
    indisputably one of the greatest guitarists of all times.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 19, 2012

    So much detail, not just of his mistakes and such, but of his he

    So much detail, not just of his mistakes and such, but of his heart, of his music,
    of those he listened to and how he admired their music. Excellent book. And a
    good reminder for those of you thinking of sleeping with musicians, don't. 

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  • Posted August 12, 2012

    I purchased this book several years ago. I loved the background

    I purchased this book several years ago. I loved the background stories of how his famous songs began, as well as learning about his playing style and the musicians who influenced him the most. Clapton will always be my favourite musician bc his style is so diverse and yet he feels comfortable in each of the styles he plays.

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