Customer Reviews for

Clean

Average Rating 4.5
( 61 )
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(39)

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(13)

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(6)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Amazing book

I absolutely love this book. It's addicting...lol.

posted by Anonymous on September 7, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Just okay.

This book was okay. I like teen fiction and I watch shows like Intervention on A&E so I was excited to read this book. I like the idea that the story is told from each character's point of view; however, the character Eva's chapters, stereotypical "emo" poetry, are conf...
This book was okay. I like teen fiction and I watch shows like Intervention on A&E so I was excited to read this book. I like the idea that the story is told from each character's point of view; however, the character Eva's chapters, stereotypical "emo" poetry, are confusing, annoying, and too drawn out to say the least. The book was too short for me. I would recommend it to be checked out of the library for a weekend, but for me it was a waste of money.

posted by LovelyDreamer08 on January 9, 2012

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  • Posted October 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Gritty & Emotional

    Clean is a hard hitting contemporary novel that deals with the struggles of a group of teens in recovery. It's not a happy book by any means, but it is a hopeful one.

    At the start of the novel you are introduced to all 5 main characters very quickly. Its a bit confusing at first trying to figure out who is who, but that doesn't last long due to each characters distinct voice. There's Kelly (the popular, party girl), Olivia (the new, rich girl), Christopher (the quite, weird boy), Eva (the rude, punk girl) and Jason (the loud, pretty boy). Most of the novel is told from Christopher and Kelly's POV, which is both a blessing and a curse since you get to know these two characters very well but also get a limited view of Eva, Jason and Olivia.

    I really enjoyed Eva's characters the most because I really felt all her sadness and vulnerability hiding beneath all her anger. However, I think everyone will be able to identify with at least one of the characters since they're all so vastly different. Even if you can't relate to the substance or recovery issue, all of these teens have gone through a personal crises that have lead them down the road to addiction.

    Clean is a very quick read due to the stories short time frame and essay like structure. Plus with the intense subject matter its nearly impossible to put down. I found the various different storytelling devices (narrative, dialogue, essay, questionnaire & group sessions) to be a really unique way to get to know all the characters. It also helped to create a more secluded and intensely emotional atmosphere within the rehab center forcing the 5 teens into relying and confiding in each other, something which they all are hesitate to do.

    I really appreciated author Amy Reed's ability to create a gritty emotional journey into the lives of these teen addicts. There is nothing glamorous about what these characters have gone or are going through. I also appreciated the honest, unapologetic and often brutal language and interaction between the teens. Was it hard to read sometimes? Yes. Was it always necessary? I think so, because I needed to feel that all 5 of these teens had hit rock bottom, which I did. That if they didn't get their lives together they were all going to end up dead or in jail.

    Towards the end of the novel we get a glimpse into how far these characters have come, but also how far they still have to go. I love the hopefulness of it because in my opinion, that's what this novel is about. That no matter what you've done to yourself or to others, things can always get better and their is always hope.

    Clean is not a book everyone is going to enjoy as there's sex, drugs, drinking, and foul language throughout. With that being said, I think that its an important novel that deals with a very delicate subject matter in a mature, realistic and hopeful way. I would definitely recommend Clean to older teens or adults who enjoy contemporary novels dealing with social and family issues.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I loved how the book is in different points of view. It made it

    I loved how the book is in different points of view. It made it much more interesting.
    I also love how the chapters are different because sometimes they focus on just one of the five patients, the group session, their personal essay, or the questionnaire.

    Christopher was my favorite character, but at times I felt like she forced his story to drag on just so she could wait until the end to expose everything that he did.
    It was predictable, so to have to wait that long to hear everything, when we already knew everyone else's complete secrets, was pretty disappointing.
    My favorite story though was Jason's. I felt for him the entire time.

    For the most part, they were all teenagers I've read before. I read a lot of books like this one, so at some parts I felt like I was just rereading a different book I've read before, which was also disappointing.

    Despite that, overall I liked the book and would definitely recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2013

    Ok then

    This reminded me that i have to clean and rearange my room

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2013

    Amazing

    Little bit a langug

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2012

    Anonymous

    This book was so good i loved it so much. I rlly loved jasons character alot. I didnt rlly like the ending tho. I feel like there shuld be a sequel cuz u didnt get to c if they quit using after they got out........and that was kind of the whole point of the book, ya know? It was.still a very enjoyable book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Sample ' Sample:)

    Omg just by reading the smple im in love with this book but ima just get it from the public library im so excited to read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 10, 2011

    Moving Stories

    Clean is the story of 5 teens in rehab. Each of them had different lives and upbringings, and each of them had a different drug of choice. They all shared addiction and the need to get help, so now they are all in the same rehab center. This book follows all 5 of them through various stages of recovery. Even though they come from very different backgrounds and lifestyles, they seem to bond over their shared problems.

    As you can imagine, a book about teens in rehab is rather hard to read. I had a particularly hard time figuring out why some of them turned to drugs. The language was often harsh, but it was realistic to the setting. I felt the most sympathy for Olivia, whose problems truly seemed to be caused in large part by the actions of others. I was glad to see that they were all forced to take responsibility for their actions. Their group councilor was awesome. We could all used someone like her around to help us see things clearer.

    Just like in real life, the end wasn't cut and dry. I worried that some of the characters may never get past their issues. However, there were a lot of really good things said in this book. I think this book can really facilitate some important discussions about how we react to things, what healthy ways to cope are, and how to recognize when people have a problem. There is also great hope that people can change and get better. That's something we could all stand to understand a little better.

    Galley provided by publisher for review.

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  • Posted August 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Gritty and moving. Clean is a story about the power to overcome and that no one can do it alone.

    Teens experience quiet a few "firsts", from jobs to cars and potential loves. It's not often a person's first time in rehab happens during their teens, but for Olivia, Kelly Chris, Jason and Eva rehab is a part of their teenage experience. Each suffering various forms of addiction and each in need of the other, though they may not know it yet. During their time together in rehab they'll learn to overcome not only their addictions, but their aversion to the others who will become their greatest source of strength. Amy Reed is known for writing about gritty tough situations that perhaps not every teen will encounter, but with an insight that many will be able to relate to. Clean was told from the viewpoints of five very different characters, each suffering from a different addiction including anything from eating disorders to alcohol or drug abuse. At first it took quite a bit to get used to the alternating viewpoints, but once I settled into my reading I was able to really appreciate how each voice worked with the others to create a gripping read. Though reading about kids recovering from these types of addictions wouldn't normally be my cup of tea, I found myself completely absorbed in their stories and hoping they'd each make it out okay. What was most appealing to me about this story, besides being something I'd never read about before, was what happened to the characters throughout the course of the story. Each one of them came from somewhere that they felt was their last stopping point and that they had nowhere to go, because of that they turned to their various addictions as comforts in the absence of what they lacked. How many of us do this to a certain degree? I would wager that most of us have varying addictions, even if only a few of us need professional help to overcome them. Through their journey in the book each of the characters discovered that first of all they hadn't reached the end of their personal stories and secondly, they could find hope in the companionship & support of the others in their same situation. That's where the story comes to life and where it shows readers the potential in their own personal journeys, no matter the ease or severity of their situation. Clean is more than a story about five washed up teens struggling through their own version of rehab. It's a story about self-awareness, confidence, strength, friendship and most of all hope. Amy Reed has shared yet another gritty and raw read that will have readers contemplating their own sources of strength and hope. Be aware, it's realistic fiction and it's obviously set in a rehab clinic filled with less than savory characters which may be uncomfortable for some to read about. Honestly, there were a couple of scenes that turned my stomach a bit, but nonetheless had me thinking this would be a great book for discussion with teens from all walks of life. Find hope in a place you might not normally go looking, in the hearts and souls of the five teens in Clean by Amy Reed. Originally reviewed and copyrighted at my site, There's A Book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Gritty and moving. Clean is a story about the power to overcome and that no one can do it alone.

    Teens experience quiet a few "firsts", from jobs to cars and potential loves. It's not often a person's first time in rehab happens during their teens, but for Olivia, Kelly Chris, Jason and Eva rehab is a part of their teenage experience. Each suffering various forms of addiction and each in need of the other, though they may not know it yet. During their time together in rehab they'll learn to overcome not only their addictions, but their aversion to the others who will become their greatest source of strength.

    Amy Reed is known for writing about gritty tough situations that perhaps not every teen will encounter, but with an insight that many will be able to relate to. Clean was told from the viewpoints of five very different characters, each suffering from a different addiction including anything from eating disorders to alcohol or drug abuse. At first it took quite a bit to get used to the alternating viewpoints, but once I settled into my reading I was able to really appreciate how each voice worked with the others to create a gripping read. Though reading about kids recovering from these types of addictions wouldn't normally be my cup of tea, I found myself completely absorbed in their stories and hoping they'd each make it out okay.

    What was most appealing to me about this story, besides being something I'd never read about before, was what happened to the characters throughout the course of the story. Each one of them came from somewhere that they felt was their last stopping point and that they had nowhere to go, because of that they turned to their various addictions as comforts in the absence of what they lacked. How many of us do this to a certain degree? I would wager that most of us have varying addictions, even if only a few of us need professional help to overcome them. Through their journey in the book each of the characters discovered that first of all they hadn't reached the end of their personal stories and secondly, they could find hope in the companionship & support of the others in their same situation. That's where the story comes to life and where it shows readers the potential in their own personal journeys, no matter the ease or severity of their situation.

    Clean is more than a story about five washed up teens struggling through their own version of rehab. It's a story about self-awareness, confidence, strength, friendship and most of all hope. Amy Reed has shared yet another gritty and raw read that will have readers contemplating their own sources of strength and hope. Be aware, it's realistic fiction and it's obviously set in a rehab clinic filled with less than savory characters which may be uncomfortable for some to read about. Honestly, there were a couple of scenes that turned my stomach a bit, but nonetheless had me thinking this would be a great book for discussion with teens from all walks of life. Find hope in a place you might not normally go looking, in the hearts and souls of the five teens in Clean by Amy Reed.

    Originally reviewed and copyrighted at my site, There's A Book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted December 6, 2011

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    Posted January 9, 2012

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    Posted October 2, 2012

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    Posted August 13, 2011

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