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Cocoa And Objective-C Cookbook

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  • Posted March 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    look at the chapter on databases

    The biggest objective drawback [pun] is the reliance on a version of Xcode that was outdated by the time this book reached the market. The vagaries of the traditional publishing industry, compared to reading articles on the Web. That said, most of the code snippets, and these are rather extensive in the text, should still hold up well and be valid code under the latest Xcode that you would use right now. As a general statement, incremental changes to Xcode would fall into 2 types - fixing bugs and extensions (to make a superset). Neither of these tends to invalidate code. (The fixing of bugs actually enables code.)

    To the extent that a code snippet from the book actually fails under your Xcode, you can treat this as a real life debugging problem. Make the situation work for you, and improve your understanding. This reflects the situation where you have existing Objective C code that runs under an Xcode version and you now update the latter, breaking the former.

    The book also functions well as a learning platform for Objective C. This is a variant of standard Kernighan and Ritchie C. If you do know the latter, the differences in Objective C will be easy to comprehend.

    Another practical aspect is the incorporation of a relational database. Essential for many applications that need a data backing store. Hawkins' choice of MySql and SQLite lets you test drive on free databases. And if you are deploying in the real world, you might want to stick to these strictly out of economy, to the extent that you can, given the demands of the users. The chapter on databases will be the most important in the book for some readers. The only drawback, if you will, is the limited number of recipes in the chapter. But take those as given, because they cover the crucial topics of how to insert rows into a table, running prepared statements, and picking a subset of rows.

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