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The Color Purple

Average Rating 4.5
( 394 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Master of wordsmithing!

Probably one of the most impressive accomplishments of the Color Purple is the slow pace Alice Walker employed to lay out Celie's letters. With the exception of a few jolts and shocks, the letters unfold themselves leisurely, over many years, with a few shifts of focus ...
Probably one of the most impressive accomplishments of the Color Purple is the slow pace Alice Walker employed to lay out Celie's letters. With the exception of a few jolts and shocks, the letters unfold themselves leisurely, over many years, with a few shifts of focus and orientation and character, but overall the same in quality and tone. (Of course, as Celie's world expands, so does her world view and vocabulary, and the "outside" gradually becomes a part of her ever expanding horizon.) This makes The Color Purple, a rather mid-sized book by novelistic standards, feel much longer. The epistolary format of the novel, used to great effect, gives the sense that time is unfolding in a far greater sweep than the 295 pages in the paperback edition. But this is only one of the masterful elements of this novel. Walker has complete command of the art of writing a work such as this, and has fully realized its potential in nearly every area of writing: character development, plot, language, style, the presentation of conflict and its resolution. Reading the Color Purple, for those who write, provides ample opportunities to show how well a novel can work when a writer exercises complete command over her materials. Alice Walker, the master of wordsmithing.

posted by Darsey_spudnick on September 2, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

If you're a man, don't read this garbage.

If I could give half a star I would. I honestly wish I could provide negative stars because that would be more appropriate. Here is what we get from this book... We learn that women are good and men are bad. Actually, I need to clarify that point. Black women are g...
If I could give half a star I would. I honestly wish I could provide negative stars because that would be more appropriate. Here is what we get from this book... We learn that women are good and men are bad. Actually, I need to clarify that point. Black women are good, but white women are bad, as demonstrated by Miss Millie. Men seem to be evil no matter what skin color they boast. This may sound like an oversimplification of the plot, but it¿s really not. The African-American female characters are relentlessly positive and good. Even when they appear slightly negative ¿ such as our early impressions of Shug and Sofia ¿ they inevitably end up as positive models for us. As for the men, they are portrayed as abusive, molesters, inscest driven, buffoonish or any combination of these plus more. Even a relatively innocuous character like Harpo doesn¿t escape the anti-male wrath he eventually shows up as something of a bad guy too. The is not one positive black or white male character in the entire book or movie. NOT A SINGLE ONE. The lack of balance borders on offensive, but because we see no one positive who isn¿t a black female, such an overall tone is exactly what comes across during this monumental piece of filth. Oh if you've a desire to e-mail me and tell me how wrong I am, don't worry... i'll wait.

posted by Anonymous on September 30, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2013

    Nookman

    Hey!!nicole here

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Purple is my favorite color?

    It sounds like a good book. Didnt read it yet.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2006

    The Color Purple

    At the beginning of the book, Cilie is a young teen, although has experienced very much. Her mother has died and been beaten, and her `father¿ allows a man named Albert to marry her, against her will. As the story progresses, Albert continues to rape and cheat on Cilie, a helpless, skinny black. When Cilie gathers enough courage to leave Albert with her dearest friend, she discovers Albert has been hiding letters from her sister, Nettie. The story, written in diary form, changes from Cilie writing to God to Nettie, and her life begins to revolve around communication with her sister. In this intriguing novel, it is a battle for Cilie with love, family and unhappiness, as she one day hopes to reconnect with her loving sister. Throughout the story, Alice Walker does an amazing job of connecting the reader to the vivid setting of the novel and to the twisted personalities of many of the characters. As she reveals the story through Cilie¿s letters, she also portrays a believable and realistic storyline.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2003

    Color Purple

    Dear God... The opening line in a book of self discovery and growth. Celie the main character in this book, takes on the responsiblility of taking care of her younger siblings at the age of 14. As she grow she is given to a man known as Mr. ____ who beats her and forces her to take care of his god awful children. She thinks of herself as nothing more than a slave in "her own home." On Celie's walk of life she meets a woman named Shug Avery. Shug is a traveling preformer and a very independent woman. She teaches Celie how to stand up for herself and learn how to live. The Color Purple is a very well written book and comes to all its readers highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2002

    Not a good book for children

    The Color Purple by Alice Walker is well written. I do think that there is a lot of inapropriate dialog for children to read. The dialog goes along with what really would have happend if the girl was a real person and showed how women, especially African American women were treated. I don't think that it should be a school summer reading book, though.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    A Hardship

    The Color Purple ia about an african woman trying to survive in southern USA. She has to deal with abuse, rape, racism and discremination because she was a woman. She was forced into loveless marriage, she struggles to be respected and to respect herself. I did not really like this book it was intended for a more mature audience.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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