Customer Reviews for

The Coming Collapse of China

Average Rating 2.5
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 14 of 13 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2007

    A reviewer

    Like a coroner opening a corpse, Gordon G. Chang dissects China's regime. His book is an indictment of the Chinese Communist Party, part autopsy report and part emotional polemic. While the ultimate truth of Chang's predictions remain to be seen (though the intervening years have shown increasing market growth in China, contrary to some of his expectations), the evidence that he amasses is impressive. Most intriguing is his contention that China's accession into the World Trade Organization ¿ heralded by many as the country's economic panacea ¿ ultimately will expose the weaknesses of China's infrastructure and begin the process of disintegration. Although Chang strongly supports his claim that collapse is imminent, you can't help but wonder, with 20-20 hindsight, if he too quickly dismissed the ability of the Party to react to changing times. After all, the regime has already outlasted most of its Communist counterparts by a decade. Nevertheless, we recommend this accessible book to policymakers, anyone doing business or investing in China, and to general business readers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2002

    Smart

    I think all the bad reviews are probably from Chinese-Americans who feel that they have to have some bit of loyalty for China. Try to think from this point of view: the government of China is NOT the culture of China. It is okay to love your motherland but do not be so blind as to defend it without reason. If you are wondering, I am a Cantonese boy. First, although I think Falun Gong is a joke, it does not deserve to be punished. Second, how can China work to be the head of two major world religions? (Buddhism and Catholicism) Third, why is China persecuting the Muslims and Buddhists? Fourth, Taiwan gave up its dictatorship for a non-Koumingtan person with democracy. The more China whines about Taiwan's independence, the more it will have to wage a war it cannot win (think about military history, too) Fifth, do you really think that China is a stable country? Millions of people are revolting all the time over there. Just because their media doesn't report it doesn't mean it don't happen. When I was in Hong Kong for 3 months, I heard about tons of bad stuff. Around 100 people die each week in China's mines (that was my crude estimate before reading this book...and I was equally surprised by how accurate it was). Also, read the WashingtonPost. Every week or so, they do a "real look" into China that spans a couple pages. Those writers are just scratching the surface of how unstable China is. Finally, isn't it funny how when the Americans accidentally bombed the Chinese embassy, the Chinese glorified the three reporters and built statues and said something like "We will never forget?" Well come September 11 and there were more than 3 Chinese nationals killed in the WTC and what has China done to honor those victums of a deliberate terrorist act? Once again, I am a Chinese-American. I am not a Falun Gong quack or Taiwanese. Read the book objectively before denouncing it without hard fact. Oh Yea, Mao will so kill himself if he found out what happened to his "beloved kingdom."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2001

    I hope this will happen

    I am a native Chinese, now working in NYC. When economy is booming, people pay little attention to all the other things. But when it comes into recession.....something unavoidable is going to happen. May those communists go to hell. Anyone who rape the other's freedom to thought and speak should go to hell. It is fortunate for all American to be an American.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2001

    Economic and Political Risks of China's Current Direction

    Mr. Chang has taken the contrary view to that so often optimistically espoused by experts on China. While most argue that China will be the world's largest economy in ten years, he argues that the foundation of the past success is built on an unsustainably rotten platform of corruption, misinvestment, and bureaucratic strangulation that will doom the country to significant chaos. While he makes a superb case for things not being as rosy as advertised in China, he fails to conclusively establish his points about future instability. As a result, you should think about this book as describing one scenario of what could happen in China with weak political leadership. This book should be required reading for companies that import from China, invest or plan to invest there, and those wanting to partner with Chinese companies. The book's many examples show that it is very risky to count on China for your future growth. Your position there is only as strong as your political connections at the moment. He who is on top now, may be on the bottom tomorrow. That part probably will turn out to be true even more true in the future. Be very careful! Although Mr. Chang has lived in China for twenty years, it is hard to imagine that anyone can capture exactly what people there are thinking. Although his observations are surely based on reality, exactly how strong that reality is can be hard to determine from the book. Too often, the arguments come from a few examples, rather than systematic evidence. On the other hand, there may be no way to gather systematic evidence, even by those in power. For example, it does seem like religion and political dissidence are on the rise. But how deep is this trend? Anarchists were active in Russia for 20 years before the Russian Revolution, and were basically irrelevant to the final political result. If China loses the race into high technology as Mr. Chang suggests, the country can still prosper by exporting lots of low technology products as it has done successfully in the past. The country is the world's most successful exporter to the United States. That basic strength is unlikely to disappear. The challenges of unemployment and underemployment from the shutting down or collapse of state-owned enterprises are real ones. If the country opens its doors to foreign investment and lets its markets be freer, much of that can be overcome as well. The overseas Chinese can certainly fund an enormous amount of economic improvements in China, but will need to see a more dependable political environment before they do. Non-Chinese investors can also help. Certainly, the potential opportunity to invest in China looks better than Russia, assuming that corruption can be held in reasonable check. That's the wild card, because corruption now seems to be significant. Communist regimes certainly have retreated around the world. The main question in China is whether the ideology will be abandoned by the party first, or the party will be abandoned by the people. Mr. Chang argues for the latter. I don't know enough to have an opinion, but a corrupt regime (as he describes here) may be flexible enough to change ideologies when the potential economic rewards are great enough. Time will tell. It certainly does appear that a banking crisis will be hard to avoid. Such a crisis would trigger another currency devaluation, which would probably cause more Asian dislocations like we saw in 1997 . . . which would cause large financial tides around the world. His basic argument seems right that the rapid growth of the past was created by excess credit and mostly went into unnecessary capital investments. Countries just don't grow this rapidly without excesses of capital spending. In many of the stories, I thought I was reading about other Asian countries in 1997. How will history repeat itself in China? After you finish thinking about Mr. Chang's argument, think about where else your assumptions from what the e

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2010

    Anger

    The author clearly has let his anger of China's communist party show over objective writing. Not worth the effort to read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    Time to face the real deal

    Almost nine years have passed.

    The year is 2009. China has not collapsed. China's GDP is expected to surpass Japan as the #2 biggest economy in one year or so. China's current GDP is more than Brazil, Russia and India combined. The world financial system (especially the US and UK banks) is in such a deep mess and teetering towards a great depression. Now the world hopes for China to stimulate sufficient growth to kick start this very sick global economy. The US hopes China will continue buying their treasury and bonds. Many Australian mining companies are near collapse desperately seeking Chinese investment. The IMF wants greater Chinese participation and money.

    Despite being disproved by the accumulated evidence since the book was published, the author is still obsessed with the theme of China's collapse through his Forbes Magazine's columns and on-line blogs, which has found many willing audience in US. Of course 'willing audience' because these guys are HOPING for this to happen. That his why G Chang's assessment about China is hopelessly subjective and biased up to this day. I don't know whether we should admire or ridicule the mental gymnastics employed by GC to maintain this delusion and of not calling a spade, a spade.

    With the US in so much debt (and continuing with the huge deficit) and dollar in deep decline, I wonder whether Gordon Chang has the guts and honesty to look at his own country and backyard, and offer some useful remedy e.g. starting with the greed of Wall Street and costly American imperial hubris.

    We can make all kinds of prediction and conclusions based on our ignorance or intelligence, bias or honesty; however the future and reality have a delightful and humbling way of sifting what is dross and precious.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2002

    Another Cheap Novel Riding On Sensationalism

    While the Title Sound Very Sensationalism, the contents are all about the writer poor assumption and lousy prediction. It may be another writer finance by CIA to bad mouth China, before the 11 Sept. Now CIA got more serious business to deal with the Islamic Terrorist, so you can expect no more this kind of cheap book around.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2002

    It's too assertive and subjective

    After reading Chang's book, I felt much of the arguments and theories put up by him in this book are not well supported with evidence. While arguing how ideology will play a role in China's collapse, Chang himself is rather troubled or deeply affected by his own hard-held ideology: His deep resentment towards the communist. I wouldn't call him a 'sinophobic', but he does sound like one of those who came a long line from Joe McCarthy and his people. I wonder if his personal ideological belief might have prevented him from reaching more objective conclusions. Needless to say, Chang's book does point out many of the problems that trouble China today. No doubt about it. However, it is Chang's conclusion that China will collapse that I found hard to buy. Chang failed to prove his case, which is the issue of 'inevitability'. A sick man might die, but not necessarily.

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    Posted October 11, 2011

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    Posted September 9, 2012

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    Posted April 10, 2011

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    Posted January 1, 2011

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    Posted December 2, 2010

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    Posted January 25, 2010

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