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The Coming Collapse of China

Average Rating 2.5
( 13 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2007

    A reviewer

    Like a coroner opening a corpse, Gordon G. Chang dissects China's regime. His book is an indictment of the Chinese Communist Party, part autopsy report and part emotional polemic. While the ultimate truth of Chang's predictions remain to be seen (though the intervening years have shown increasing market growth in China, contrary to some of his expectations), the evidence that he amasses is impressive. Most intriguing is his contention that China's accession into the World Trade Organization ¿ heralded by many as the country's economic panacea ¿ ultimately will expose the weaknesses of China's infrastructure and begin the process of disintegration. Although Chang strongly supports his claim that collapse is imminent, you can't help but wonder, with 20-20 hindsight, if he too quickly dismissed the ability of the Party to react to changing times. After all, the regime has already outlasted most of its Communist counterparts by a decade. Nevertheless, we recommend this accessible book to policymakers, anyone doing business or investing in China, and to general business readers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2002

    Smart

    I think all the bad reviews are probably from Chinese-Americans who feel that they have to have some bit of loyalty for China. Try to think from this point of view: the government of China is NOT the culture of China. It is okay to love your motherland but do not be so blind as to defend it without reason. If you are wondering, I am a Cantonese boy. First, although I think Falun Gong is a joke, it does not deserve to be punished. Second, how can China work to be the head of two major world religions? (Buddhism and Catholicism) Third, why is China persecuting the Muslims and Buddhists? Fourth, Taiwan gave up its dictatorship for a non-Koumingtan person with democracy. The more China whines about Taiwan's independence, the more it will have to wage a war it cannot win (think about military history, too) Fifth, do you really think that China is a stable country? Millions of people are revolting all the time over there. Just because their media doesn't report it doesn't mean it don't happen. When I was in Hong Kong for 3 months, I heard about tons of bad stuff. Around 100 people die each week in China's mines (that was my crude estimate before reading this book...and I was equally surprised by how accurate it was). Also, read the WashingtonPost. Every week or so, they do a "real look" into China that spans a couple pages. Those writers are just scratching the surface of how unstable China is. Finally, isn't it funny how when the Americans accidentally bombed the Chinese embassy, the Chinese glorified the three reporters and built statues and said something like "We will never forget?" Well come September 11 and there were more than 3 Chinese nationals killed in the WTC and what has China done to honor those victums of a deliberate terrorist act? Once again, I am a Chinese-American. I am not a Falun Gong quack or Taiwanese. Read the book objectively before denouncing it without hard fact. Oh Yea, Mao will so kill himself if he found out what happened to his "beloved kingdom."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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