Customer Reviews for

The Confessions of Nat Turner

Average Rating 4
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted May 17, 2009

    A good psychological look at slavery from the inside out

    When civil rights leaders were looking for a case to take to the Supreme Court regarding school segregation, they rightfully looked to the best segregated schools in the country--those which had the best system of "separate but equal" education for whites and blacks--which they found in Kansas, specifically in Topeka. The court found that the problem with "separate but equal" was not in equality but in separation which was in fact an extension of slavery. Styron has taken similar action in choosing Nat Turner as the protagonist of this novel. Nat was somewhat educated and trained in a craft. He didn't work the cotton fields and for the most part his masters did not horribly mistreat him. The psychological effects of slavery were as deep, however, as those of any field hand. Nat hated white people in a stereotypical fashion that is the underpinning of all slavery, though we usually think of stereotyping from the white perspective. Few authors have given readers a glimpse of this bottom up stereotyping of whites from the slave's point of view as does Styron. Enlightening!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2000

    A Confession you need to hear

    This book has been attacked for taking too much liberty with history. I cannot understand this since history is mostly silent concerning Nat Turner: The Man. Styron has also been charged with an inaccurate and unflattering portrait of a slave. I believe this charge stems from the discomfort of being as close to slavery as Styron brings us in this book. Romantics may think Nat Turner needs special qualities to lead a slave uprising as he did, but how realistic is that? I prefer Styron's account of a good man caught in the machinery of a horrible institution who is stretched to the breaking point. Nat Turner was a man in the end; we often try to make legends more than that. Huck Finn makes many uncomfortable for the same reasons this book does. Rather than trying to paint a rosy picture, we need to consider the reality books like this portray.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Natasha

    How am i suppose to explain to him that his daddy was put on death row for 60 r.a.p.e.s

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Nick

    Got out of the car and held her. Natasha whats wrong?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    Although Styron attempted to do good by writing this book, his u

    Although Styron attempted to do good by writing this book, his underlying racists attitude towards a man who sacrificed his life for a cause 
    kept slipping anyway. No one is sure where Styron got his creative license but that agency that gave it to him, should shut down. He won a
     pulitizer prize for killing Nat  Turner's character.  Maybe that's why so many bad things are written about people of color because in the
    late 60's you could get a pulitizer prize.

    It is bad enough that Nat Turner was cut to pieces and his body parts sold. Nat did  not
    deserve a southern white fiction writer to kill his character the way Styron did. it was wrong and uncalled for.  It was outright disgusting.
    Nat Turner did not have homosexual tendencies as alluded to in this trash of a book. His motivation for the insurrection had nothing to do
     with Nat  wanting to sleep with white women.  Research has shown and the most recent book about Turner has shown that Nat Turner
    was a married man with a beautiful supportive wife and child.

    If you want to know about Nat Turner, the truth about him, skip this book.
    Get the new book Prophet The Story of Nat Turner and combine it with the original Confessions of Nat Turner by Thomas Gray.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Good read

    I am a thirteen year old girl, and i find this book to be not only good, well written literature, but captivating and somewhat hostorically correct. As i read, i was captivated throughout. Hats off to Styron(if he weren'nt dead)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2003

    True Literature

    William Styron, winner of countless literary prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize (for Confessions) and the Prix de Rome, is probably one of the best writers of critical acclaim today. He has lived to see his novels grace the shelves of college bookstores (as canonical Southern Literature) and has even lived to read a definitive biography written about him. He does not simply write novels, he writes literature. And The Confessions of Nat Turner is no exception. Confessions is a brilliant amalgam of history, elegant prose, and an intense, if not sometimes overwrought, imagination. Ultimately, Confessions is a novel of tragedy, a sense of which can be felt from the very beginning. It is an almost melancholy book that, despite what some critics have said, does not downplay the evil and ignorance of slavery at all. Rather, it provides an intimate protraiture of slavery and of slaves, particularly the tormented Nat Turner. I highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2002

    Just Brave and Beautiful

    I viewed this book and believed that this novel would just turn out like any other. I was wrong, and I find out that there is an extreme amount of knowledge that I had been baffled about. Once I had read this novel, almost all of my answers have been met. I would recommend this to anyone. I usually don't have a particular caring of a book, but this just made me wonder and wonder about the next step!! Two thumbs up!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1