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Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist: Learning to Be Free

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

"Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free

"Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" by Amanda Jenkins was a surprise hit for me! I honestly didn't think I'd enjoy or get much out of it, as I'm in no way a perfectionist, but I read it because it was a free eBook from one of my favor...
"Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" by Amanda Jenkins was a surprise hit for me! I honestly didn't think I'd enjoy or get much out of it, as I'm in no way a perfectionist, but I read it because it was a free eBook from one of my favorite publishers, and you can't go wrong with free, right? ;-) I'm very thankful I did go ahead and read it, as there is something for everyone in "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist." Although we all may not be OCD or perfectionists across the board, each one of us lives in a culture that pressures us and gives us ridiculously unrealistic (and sometimes just unreal) standards to live up to, whether we fully realize it or not. And that's where I believe Mrs. Jenkins does an admirable job: sharing her story and making it relatable to us all. 

Just a glance at the chapter headings will give you a clue that "Confessions" is applicable to anyone: "Vanity", "Recognition", "Pride" and "Happiness", just to name a few. Even those chapters that didn't appear initially pertinent like "Diet Coke" ended up giving me great insight to areas of weakness and fleshliness in my own life. Essentially the entire point of "Confessions" is that we need not get caught up in man/self-made goals and standards that can change with a whim and the seasons, but rather look to Christ as our ultimate Standard and His Glory as our goal. 

I so appreciate the saturation of Scripture in this book. You cannot go wrong writing a book entitled "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" when the foundation is the Source of true freedom: the very words of God. Although I wouldn't categorize this as a "self-help" or "fix-all" book, I do believe we Christian women could all learn a little (or a lot) from Mrs. Jenkins as she tackles so many of the hang-ups and strongholds in our lives that keep us from absolute freedom and peace in Christ. 

Oh, and one final note: there's a handy little discussion guide at the end of the book that you could use as you read chapter by chapter, either on your own or in a small group/Bible study setting. Definitely a very cool and helpful feature. 

And on that note, I give "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" 5 stars!

posted by AlaskanTebowFan on August 28, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

This would have been more aptly titled "Confessions of a Ra

This would have been more aptly titled "Confessions of a Raging Narcissist."

Seriously, this is worse than reading your most self-absorbed friend's Facebook page.... because, being a perfectionist, I made myself finish all 173 pages, and it was a struggle. Th...
This would have been more aptly titled "Confessions of a Raging Narcissist."

Seriously, this is worse than reading your most self-absorbed friend's Facebook page.... because, being a perfectionist, I made myself finish all 173 pages, and it was a struggle. The author makes a pretense of showing humility, but even in doing so it's clear that she is still trying to tell the world how perfect and awesome she is. It isn't cute.

Every chapter seemed repetitious and unnecessary... we get it, you're a perfectionist.  It gets to a point where she almost seems to be bragging about her perfectionism.

posted by KMEvans09 on July 11, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2013

    This would have been more aptly titled "Confessions of a Ra

    This would have been more aptly titled "Confessions of a Raging Narcissist."

    Seriously, this is worse than reading your most self-absorbed friend's Facebook page.... because, being a perfectionist, I made myself finish all 173 pages, and it was a struggle. The author makes a pretense of showing humility, but even in doing so it's clear that she is still trying to tell the world how perfect and awesome she is. It isn't cute.

    Every chapter seemed repetitious and unnecessary... we get it, you're a perfectionist.  It gets to a point where she almost seems to be bragging about her perfectionism.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free

    "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" by Amanda Jenkins was a surprise hit for me! I honestly didn't think I'd enjoy or get much out of it, as I'm in no way a perfectionist, but I read it because it was a free eBook from one of my favorite publishers, and you can't go wrong with free, right? ;-) I'm very thankful I did go ahead and read it, as there is something for everyone in "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist." Although we all may not be OCD or perfectionists across the board, each one of us lives in a culture that pressures us and gives us ridiculously unrealistic (and sometimes just unreal) standards to live up to, whether we fully realize it or not. And that's where I believe Mrs. Jenkins does an admirable job: sharing her story and making it relatable to us all. 

    Just a glance at the chapter headings will give you a clue that "Confessions" is applicable to anyone: "Vanity", "Recognition", "Pride" and "Happiness", just to name a few. Even those chapters that didn't appear initially pertinent like "Diet Coke" ended up giving me great insight to areas of weakness and fleshliness in my own life. Essentially the entire point of "Confessions" is that we need not get caught up in man/self-made goals and standards that can change with a whim and the seasons, but rather look to Christ as our ultimate Standard and His Glory as our goal. 

    I so appreciate the saturation of Scripture in this book. You cannot go wrong writing a book entitled "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" when the foundation is the Source of true freedom: the very words of God. Although I wouldn't categorize this as a "self-help" or "fix-all" book, I do believe we Christian women could all learn a little (or a lot) from Mrs. Jenkins as she tackles so many of the hang-ups and strongholds in our lives that keep us from absolute freedom and peace in Christ. 

    Oh, and one final note: there's a handy little discussion guide at the end of the book that you could use as you read chapter by chapter, either on your own or in a small group/Bible study setting. Definitely a very cool and helpful feature. 

    And on that note, I give "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist (learning to be free)" 5 stars!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 1, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I absolutely loved everything about this book...except the cover

    I absolutely loved everything about this book...except the cover. But the words contained inside were just what I needed to nurture my imperfect person and to calm the raging perfectionist in me.

    Amanda Jenkins writes with humor and wit, and she shares from her heart. I could sit and have a Diet Pepsi with her and talk for hours about life and faith, and feel totally at ease in her company. In fact, I felt as if I'd just had a long conversation with her as I finished the book.

    Her diary entries are hilarious; she opens each chapter with a different selection. And she makes it quite clear that she's a perfectionist in recovery. She hasn't arrived at full healing yet, but she's enjoying the journey that she's now on.

    I didn't know this before I read the book, but Amanda is married to filmmaker Dallas Jenkins, son of best-selling author Jerry B. Jenkins. I'm kind of glad I didn't know that until I began reading, because I saw Amanda rather than Jerry Jenkins daughter-in-law.

    Be prepared for some tough revelation about yourself as you read. I identified so much with Amanda's journey that I read portions to my husband and he asked "Is that about her or about you?" For instance, graduating from college just .001 away from honors--because we met the men in our lives and our work took a back seat.

    Yup. Happened to both of us.

    Our addiction to diet drinks (she prefers Coke, I prefer Pepsi, but still).

    Yup. I have to keep count or I overdose as well.

    And our desire to be seen as someone who is 'put together', when we both know we have more issues than People Magazine. But it's those issues that draw us together as women, and it's Amanda's honesty that pulled me in to the book.

    I received a copy of "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist" from Tyndale Publishing in exchange for an honest review. This is one of the best books on personal growth in the life of a believer that I've come across this year, and it goes on my 'keeper' shelf.

    If I had the money, I'd be buying cases of the book to give out to women who are struggling with their own case of perfectionism...but alas, I don't. Instead, "Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist" is highly, highly recommended.

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  • Posted September 13, 2013

    A winner!!!

    I made all the women in my world get this book! It is THAT good!!

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  • Posted September 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Change, real change, like real life, is hardly ever easy and




    Change, real change, like real life, is hardly ever easy and almost always messy. The path to transformation is often costly, rarely efficient, and like most renovations can take a lot longer than estimated. Change, real change, like real life, is hardly ever easy and almost always messy. Just ask Amanda Jenkins’ about her own journey to perfection and how goals need to be both flexible and thoughtful.




    If you’re stuck replaying a past filled personal failures or have too many goals on your to-do-list you might enjoy reading the confessions of an avowed list maker and stat keeper.




    A dozen worthwhile themes are addressed in here. The book is divided into chapters (Vanity, Money, Recognition, Pride are a few titles) and is based on her own experiences and journal entries. Written from with a Christian viewpoint (she is the daughter-in-law of multimillionaire and New York Times Best Selling Author Jerry Jenkins ) the book contains page after page of long biblical passages from a number of different translations. While not my favorite approach perhaps some readers will find the answers they are looking for.




    The final chapter, New Chapter, contains questions for Bible Study groups, book clubs, private reflection and offers real tools to help the active participant embrace growth.


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  • Posted August 27, 2013

    Amanda Jenkins used her book Confessions of a Raging Perfectioni

    Amanda Jenkins used her book Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist to be completely honest about her life. She started each chapter with statistics about her life. She shared real life examples of things that happened in her life or her friend's lives, things that were perfectly planned but did not go according to plan. She shared what lessons she learned from those circumstances and gave the reader food for thought. There are study questions included in the back of the book for each chapter. This book is a good teaching tool for anyone trying to break free from perfectionist bonds.

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  • Posted August 24, 2013

    Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist is one of the best devotio

    Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist is one of the best devotional books I’ve read in a long time. It is wonderfully written. It’s clear, honest, funny, full of scripture. This was a very encouraging book, and I would highly recommend it to any woman.

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  • Posted August 19, 2013

    The style of writing was not really my style of reading; it felt

    The style of writing was not really my style of reading; it felt a little spacey like the chapters were random not in chronological order. But then I read the chapter called Diet Coke and it struck a cord with me. Amanda talks about the things that she uses to bring peace to her life; things that take the place of God to bring peace and I was convicted. I want that next "Diet Coke" because it will bring a momentary peace and order to otherwise chaos; rather than looking to God for my true peace.

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  • Posted August 19, 2013

    One of the best books I've read all year, if not likely to join

    One of the best books I've read all year, if not likely to join my lifetime top 10.  Amanda Jenkins's 'Confessions' is honest, witty, and compelling.  It helps that her voice as well as her issues are similar to mine, however, I can only guess that there are others out there dealing with similar challenges too.




    Presented in a fun and transparent way, this book discusses topics on everything from Vanity to Obedience, Parenthood to Diet Coke (yes Diet Coke) and she is unflinchingly honest in her self assessments - her real-ness is refreshing.  She shares personal stories and verses and heart thoughts; other's stories and life lessons; all in a way that was illuminating to me and encouraging at the same time.  We are after all, works in progress - and this book does not claim to show you how to get it all together and be free from perfectionism (or whatever plagues you) - but it does give a great deal of hope.




    I can't recommend it enough.

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  • Posted August 19, 2013

    Read as part of the Tyndale House Summer Reading Program. The ti

    Read as part of the Tyndale House Summer Reading Program. The title caught my eye right off and I couldn't wait to read this book, but I was disapointed. No new information was shared. It's the same old story of if I'd just see myself how God sees me then I won't need to be a perfectionist. The only connection I had with this book is the authors experience with adoption.

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  • Posted August 17, 2013

    Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist is about one women's battl

    Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist is about one women's battle with being a perfectionist. This book was more of a personal reflection by the author. I found the book easy to relate to and enjoyed the chapter where the author shared her testimony. God doesn't expect perfection, however when I share my testimony, I feel that I need to be perfect.In reality we have many opportunities where we can give God credit for what He's done in our lives. We just need to do it!

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  • Posted August 16, 2013

    Did Not Engage Me but Had Good Aspects. The title intrigued me,

    Did Not Engage Me but Had Good Aspects. The title intrigued me, but I did not find the book highly useful at learning to be free. The last chapter was the best, because it quoted Scripture and then went into her insights verse by verse. It took courage for her to admit a lot of these flaws, and I doubt I could have done it. I admire her for that, and for a turn of phrase that sounds like she's right there talking to you as a friend. I'm a bit of a perfectionist myself, so I finished it, but I found sections that were not germane to the issue, and parts that left me with more questions. To be fair, she did make it clear that this is more a series of journal entries than a how-to book, and it shows. I did appreciate the interesting contributions by her friends.

    I understood her struggles, but do not relate to half of them. Few of her TV and movie references hit any chord with me. They seemed to make it a rambling narrative - again, no doubt on purpose as this is mostly a journal. After all, we are all a work in progress. Probably someone with more in common with Amanda would appreciate this book more. One positive thing it did was to send me back to the Bible to look again at some of the most beautiful and relevant Psalms.

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  • Posted July 30, 2013

    Amanda Jenkins is a perfectionist who makes a list every day and

    Amanda Jenkins is a perfectionist who makes a list every day and vows to change. From her study of the Bible, she has started to be free from her problem. The author uses personal illustrations and Bible verses to show her journey. I thought this was a good book and that the author made some interesting discoveries about her life. There is a workbook of sorts in the back with questions and space for answers, designed to help the reader apply the information in the book.

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  • Posted July 21, 2013

    If you are a perfectionist, or have characteristics of perfectio

    If you are a perfectionist, or have characteristics of perfectionism, this book is for you. When reading non-fiction books, I always try to find at least one or two little nuggets to take with me and learn from. This book offers nugget after nugget after nugget. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry, and it might teach you something about changing the way you view yourself and allow you to let up on being perfect, or at least give you some tools to work on it.

    I like the way the book is organized where each chapter is a topic one might struggle with, because it was easy to see in the beginning what Jenkins would be discussing, and it will make it easy to refer back to on the days I am struggling with my perfectly made plans falling through or being transparent and vulnerable in relationships. My favorite quote from Jenkins is that of course God gives us things we can't handle - that way we'll get out of the driver's seat! So funny, but true for control-freak perfectionists!

    So, if you struggle with the impossible pursuit of perfection, give this book a try. It might not cure you, but it might help you make some changes!

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  • Posted June 5, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    You don¿t have to be a perfectionist to be able to relate to, an

    You don’t have to be a perfectionist to be able to relate to, and thoroughly enjoy this book. You just have to be human. 

    I’m accused of being a perfectionist every now and then. I let things sap my time. Useless things. Things that don’t really matter in the long run. Like…vacuuming my way out of a room so my footprints don’t show on the carpet. Searching endlessly for just the right verb for my manuscript. Making sure all my paper money (which usually isn’t much) faces the same direction in my wallet. Not allowing my real pillow (the one I sleep on) to peek out from behind the shammed (fake) pillow. I could go on and on…but I’ll spare you.

    Amanda Jenkins, self-accused perfectionist, frankly shares her experiences, alongside biblical scriptures, to help the reader sift through their similar struggles.

    I really like Amanda’s conversational tone. It’s as if she’s sitting across the table, chatting with the reader over a cup of tea, lending advice in a non-demanding, non-judgmental way. 
    An enjoyable read with profound lessons and Biblical principles. 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    Week after week there are more books published to help us all fi

    Week after week there are more books published to help us all fit more into our busy schedules, to cram more into an hour, and squeeze more out of a minute. Amanda Jenkins confesses to believing, like many of us, that these were worthy goals, habits of highly effective people. Formerly a slave to routines, plans, and daily checklists, Jenkins uses this book to celebrate the freedom of letting go of that daily perfectionism and letting God back into her busy schedule. If you’re feeling the press and stress of modern life, picking up Confessions of a Raging Perfectionist is an excellent way to engage with someone else who has been there too, and to begin reorganizing your life and your expectations for yourself,  those around you, and God himself. After all, says Jenkins, “God alone saves, and people aren’t drawn to perfect people anyway.” Too true. 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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