Customer Reviews for

Consider the Lobster: And Other Essays

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

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3 Star

(6)

2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    Missing "Host"

    Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with David Foster Wallace's writing. In fact it is superb. I've given the nook book version of his essay collection only one star because it is missing probably one his most interesting pieces, "Host." Perhaps the reason is because the form is so strange and it couldn't be adapted to a nook book format. However, I don't buy this excuse. The hard copy is cheaper (online) and complete, so buy that one instead.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    Read all you can of DFW

    David Foster Wallace has looked into the heart of American. I think he saw all we are/were and had trouble coming to grips with it. A man for all seasons. His writing reminds me of the character Homer Simpson in that we all have a trait that is a fault, so you can either take a step back and laugh at yourself, or you reject the truth of it. Those who reject the truth often can not look at themselves with a truly enlighten and open mind. The truth is out faults are what make us most human and in that respect most endearing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Consider this Book?

    David Foster Wallace is the best writer you haven't read. This book of essays allows the reader to get a great idea of how he writes. He's witty, amusing, well-researched, and talented. I cannot speak for his short stories or other fiction, but his essays were very fun to read.<BR/><BR/>Note, his favorite essay technique is the footnote, so be prepared. Every essay is an exercise for the eye as much as the brain.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Wallace is a bit too pedantic

    My first few years of college I was always tempted to write grandiose sentences with every "big word" I could squeeze in. Then I realized that it isn't helpful nor does it make me appear intelligent, it just makes you appear pompous, especially in the internet age where everyone writing an essay has the internet with its dictionaries and thesauruses at their fingertips.

    That being said, "Consider the Lobster" the essay, not the entire book, was really good. A few of the others were interesting. There are quite a few that I tried to read but couldn't force myself to.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Superb essays

    Though this reviewer rarely reads essay collections, this form of literature is both my favorite and my most detested format (corollary to the 50 page rule of why keep reading if it so bad, for essays a 20 page rule). When satirically amusing and filled with irony on ¿postmodern¿ life, nothing beats an essay such as classics like the ¿postmodern¿ ¿How to Cook Roast Pig¿ or ¿A Modest Proposal¿. David Foster Wallace provides ten delightful articles on a variety of topics ranging from the relativity of pornography to generalizing the insipidness of sports autobiographies extracting from Tracy Austin¿s perfect tennis adventure (Bill and Ted for a set anyone). In Mr. Wallace¿s delightful way, if one wants to know whether a lobster feels pain while undergoing scalding water treatment, don¿t ask the cook, the lobsterman, or the zoologist go to the source (not sauce): ask the lobster who obviously is not dancing their life away. Same goes to McCain's presidential bid lost during a failed debate with a fundamentalist demanding the senator turn no cheek insisting Christ condemned homosexuality. Though the asides can be difficult to follow with abbrev, they are fun to follow up on with their deeper explanations and Americanization of the English language through ibid. Readers will appreciate the deep look at ¿postmodern¿ American life as a fabulous INFINITE JEST. --- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    Please post and ill give you a puppy

    Let me post ive never posted on here let me post post postpost

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    From sex pots to lobster pots

    Only in the world of David Foster Wallace could porn wind up being the most boring thing on the menu. Lobster serves up a variety of delights - including the ridiculously good article for Gourmet this collection draws its name from - but only if you can manage to slog through the inappropriately footnoted roman a clef appertif. Wallace's signature style fares much better in his essay on the Dictionary of American Usage, which I found easily the most interesting thing he's ever written. SNOOTS of the world, unite!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2007

    Where's the humor?

    I couldn't even finish the audio book. The lobster tale (sorry for the pun) and the 9/11 reminiscense were mildly amusing. By the third story I was numb and turned it off.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2010

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    Posted March 27, 2011

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    Posted January 23, 2009

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    Posted January 1, 2009

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    Posted June 8, 2009

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    Posted December 11, 2008

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    Posted July 26, 2009

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    Posted October 23, 2008

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    Posted December 9, 2009

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    Posted November 3, 2008

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    Posted October 25, 2008

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    Posted August 11, 2011

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