Customer Reviews for

Contemporary Gothic

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Posted December 27, 2012

    An Adequate Resource

    This book is good as an introduction to the gothic, but I was hoping for something more in depth. I learned about the presence of the gothic in advertising, but I did not get as much from this book as I had anticipated.
    However, it was well written and accessible for anyone interested in this topic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2007

    the prevalence of the gothic in today's popular culture

    CONTEMPORARY GOTHIC by Catherine Spooner. London: FOCI Imprint/Reaktion Books, 2006 distributed in U. S. by U. of Chicago Press.. 175 pages. $19.95 trade paper, ISBN 1-861189-301-9. photographs, notes. In this book on popular culture, Spooner writes about how 'Gothic narratives have escaped the confines of literature and spread across disciplinary boundaries to infect all kinds of media, from fashion to advertising to the way contemporary events are constructed in mass culture.' This is evident in the clothing worn by many punk-rock musicians, the prevalence of tattoos and body piercing, and the popularity of horror movies. But Spooner not only engages in an entertaining inventory of the divrse manifestations of the gothic in contemporary culture, but also delves into the historical and literary roots of the gothic and reasons for its attraction and persistence. In its idiomatic, inimitable way, the gothic represents the potent psychic themes of subconscious memories of the past and ties to the dead, the creation of the 'other' (e. g. Frankenstein's monster), the fragmentary self, the mutability of the body, and one's own death and reincarnation. The gothic does not resolve anxieties 'both personal and collective' attending these, however. Spooner's general perspective is that it is a way of dealing with the anxieties. The periodic reawakenings of the gothic usually originate among younger people for its graphic imagery connoting unconventionality and a degree of rebelliousness. Spooner is a lecturer in literature at England's Lancaster University and author of the 2004 book 'Fashioning Gothic Bodies.' Her sure hand with the wide range of subject matter amkes for an especially lucid exploration of the vein of the gothic in today's pop and youth cultures.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2007

    The prevalence of the gothic in popular culture

    In this book on popular culture, Spooner writes about how 'Gothic narratives have escaped the confines of literature and spread across disciplinary boundaries to infect all kinds of media, from fashion to advertising to the way contemporary events are constructed in mass culture.' This is evident in the clothing worn by many punk-rock musicians, the prevalence of tattoos and body piercing, and the popularity of horror movies. But Spooner not only engages in an entertaining inventory of the diverse manifestations of the gothic in contemporary culture, but also delves into the historical and literary roots of the gothic and reasons for its attraction and persistence. In its idiomatic, inimitable way, the gothic represents the potent psychic themes of subconscious memories of the past and ties to the dead, the creation of the 'other' (e. g. Frankenstein's monster), the fragmentary self, the mutability of the body, and one's own death and reincarnation. The gothic does not resolve anxieties 'both personal and collective' attending these, however. Spooner's general perspective is that it is a way of dealing with the anxieties. The periodic reawakening of the gothic usually originate among younger people for its graphic imagery connoting unconventionality and a degree of rebelliousness. Spooner is a lecturer in literature at England's Lancaster University and author of the 2004 book 'Fashioning Gothic Bodies.' Her sure hand with the wide range of subject matter makes for an especially lucid exploration of the vein of the gothic in today's pop and youth cultures.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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