Customer Reviews for

The Count of Monte Cristo (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

101 out of 111 people found this review helpful.

Best Version I Have Seen

I have noticed that most of the reviews for this edition speak about Dumas' work in general, but I have to make a point that Robin Buss makes in the beginning of the book: almost every other version of The Count of Monte Cristo in English is either an abridgment or the ...
I have noticed that most of the reviews for this edition speak about Dumas' work in general, but I have to make a point that Robin Buss makes in the beginning of the book: almost every other version of The Count of Monte Cristo in English is either an abridgment or the product of Victorian editing.

This book has to be praised for the mere fact that Buss went back to the original French and translated it wonderfully, not abridging or altering the essential storyline.

As of now, this is the only edition of such caliber that I know of, and for now, it is all I recommend that people buy.

Avoid all other editions and publishers, or at least make sure whether the one you want is an abridgment or not.

posted by akihiko on October 1, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

42 out of 55 people found this review helpful.

Abridged Versions Dont tell the whole story

I had purchased a copy of this book because I love the story of the Count of Monte Cristo and wanted a version in hard back. It was only after I was reading through it when I noticed stuff different from my penguin soft back version did I flip to the front to discover ...
I had purchased a copy of this book because I love the story of the Count of Monte Cristo and wanted a version in hard back. It was only after I was reading through it when I noticed stuff different from my penguin soft back version did I flip to the front to discover the book was abridged. Who ever edited this book had to have been stupid because they did a horrible job of editing. I could understand cutting material which isn't critical to the story. Examples from the unabridged version included 'How to rescue a gardener from dormice who are eating his peaches' and 'the road for Belgium.' However to deliberately omit major portions which are critical to the whole of the story is wrong and causes the whole story to be misrepresented. Major portions which were omitted included the the final judgment of Danglars at the hands of Vampa, and also the story of Andrea Cavalcanti and how he ties to both Villefort and Danglars. Even the comic book version of the story I read as a kid managed to included all of these. This abridged version of this book isnt worth the paper it is written on. I am extremely disappointed at Barnes and Noble for putting their name on crap like this. Don't waste your money, go get yourself a penguin classics version instead and read the whole story.

posted by Anonymous on October 7, 2008

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  • Posted September 12, 2013

    I totally liked this book ... so much that I decided to read the

    I totally liked this book ... so much that I decided to read the critical analysis of the various characters, and then I realized this abridged version isn't at all like the original. Very disappointing! Whole segments are missing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 21, 2014

    I must admit, I didn't know this book was abridged until after I

    I must admit, I didn't know this book was abridged until after I bought it and looked at the title page.
    I've seen other editions, at Barnes & Noble, no less, that were even MORE abridged, about 57 chapters or so.
    This particular edition has 71 chapters, and many other editions, not just B&N, are this long.  
    I've only found out that the
    unabridged editions are 1000 to 1200 pages. What do the missing parts contain, and are they worth reading?
    I don't know, but if you are interested, reading this particular edition might be a good start, and may help you understand
    it a little better should you want to proceed to the entire unabridged edition.That being said, I really didn't mind the book, and I've always wanted to read it. It is a tale of a seemingly
     innocent man, Edmond Dantes, who, as he started out in life, was a sailor for a merchant ship, captained by
     Morrel, who earned his favor, and had the love of a beautiful woman, named Mercedes.
    This is where the plot comes in; Dantes fortune is eyed with envy by two others,
     Fernand, who knows and wants the girl, and Danglers, who was jealous of Dantes position on the
    merchant ship. So they plot his demise by framing him with a false accusation by way of a letter
     implicating him as an ally of Napoleon, where he is arrested at his betrothal to Mercedes, and with
    the compliance of a Judge, Villefort, throws Dantes in a prison on the an island called the Chateau d'If.
    There he remains for 14 years, where he meets up with another prisoner, where they exchange stories of their
    lives, how they were unjustly thrown in this dark dungeon, and how, as Dantes' friend dies, he leaves him a
    fortune on the Isle of Monte Cristo should Dantes successfully escape. Dantes, when his friend dies, puts himself in the sack of his friend, where it is tossed into the
    ocean.  Dantes, escapes, and goes to the Isle of Monte Cristo to claim his inheritance.An Innkeeper updates him on the
     goings on of his peers, where he finds that Mercedes, with Dantes gone, marries his rival
     Fernand and has a son (Albert), and the three families of those responsible for his demise
     all live close to one another in Paris.Dantes then takes on the title Count of Monte Cristo, and then goes to Paris to live among
     these families, observe their goings on and whatever corruption may surface and he exploits it,
     but passively, without any hint of him being involved, and without any of them knowing who he
     really is, thinking they've forgotten about their evil deed.So the plot comes in like a soap opera. There is no swashbuckling like in the movies, but the
    plot is interesting. Also, the Count saves those who helped him early on, and the villains have
     acquired new names, but the Count see through them, and from here, I'll let the reader figure
    out the rest. You will like the ending, but I that's all I'll say.Anyway, it's a classic, even in it's abridged form, but you do have to go back a few chapters to
     understand the present situation. Also, you have to pair the names (Fernand=Morcerf, etc.)Part of it gets confusing, with the plots and situations of each individual family of which the Count is involved.
     I have the impression the the full version may be boring, but that's just a guess. It may also clear up
    what is missed here, but after reading this particular version, still worth reading, you may or may not
    want to read the full version, depending on what you think of this edition.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    China

    Sigh......

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2012

    great book but too many typos

    Great book but too many typos

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    Ahhh!

    I had to read this for class, and I didnt enjoy it at all!! I know it wouldve been better if I read it myself, but it took me so long that I didnt enjoy it anymore. Its a great story, but I drifted away at times....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2012

    Great

    Awesome story

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  • Posted April 30, 2011

    Great Book - bad ebook version

    The story is excellant (5*) although I had problems with this version on my nook. I continued to get an error and the pages turned very slowly. The nook rep at barnes & noble suggested that the ebook version may have an error in the programming causing this problem. It is the only e-book I've purchased that has acted this way on my nook. Also, when I 1st opened the book I noticed that the print as very light lettering, making it a more difficult version then most to read & changing the font was not successful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2011

    second volume

    this is the second volume.

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  • Posted April 19, 2011

    volume 1

    this is the first volume

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  • Posted February 15, 2011

    Novel: 5 stars. Reading on NookColor: 1 star. Spellbound intimately to the fate of Dumas' characters. Too bad I didn't realize that a novel of this capacity would create this ereader to malfunction....

    I eventually finished this incredible story. But, had known I wouldn't be able to highlight favorite passages and leave comments; or had I known the difficulty in turning pages or selecting other touch screen options.....I would have bought the book instead. Come to think of it, The Count of Monte Cristo is worthy to land on my bookshelf!! In addition, the movie is good in its own right, but like most if not all adaptations, just can't fullfill the gravity of authors intention. BUY the BOOK, it may be heavy....but its worth it!

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  • Posted January 23, 2011

    -- check it out!!

    The story begins with Edmond Dantés returning home from his voyage at sea. He has been waiting to have his fiance, Mercédès, in his arms. He finds her with her lovestruck cousin, Fernand Mondengo, who is envious of their relationship since he is in love with her. Danglars, the man in charge of all financial matters, tries to change the opinions people have about Dantés. With Fernand and Danglars combined, they plan the downfall of Dantés. They accuse him of treason and the police arrest him at his betrothal feast. Accused of being in the Bonapartist party, they send him to a prison on a nearby island, Château d'if. With the help of a fellow cellmate, he escapes and plans retribution on those who did him wrong. What I liked about the book is that is showed the different point of views of the characters. For example, when Dantés was arrested it showed Mercédès' point of view of the situation. What I disliked about the novel, is that it is the abridged version, so you don't know what you are missing. I would not recommend this book because you may be missing certain important details.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    For a classic not bad....

    The Count of Monte Cristo is definitely the best classic novel that I have read in a while, and I am looking forward to finally watching the movie. A novel whose central theme is REVENGE and Edmond Dantes bringing judgment to those that have betrayed him and ruined his once promising life of fortune and love with his finance Mercedes. The outcome of Mercedes' life left me disappointed, but in the grand scheme of the storyline I understand the symbolism and necessity. Edmond Dantes transformation in prison of acquiring skills to serve a purpose for when he gets out has been used and applied in modern/current society. The purpose can end up being positive or negative, for instance, Nelson Mandela made a positive impact on the world once he was released from prison. An easy read, but I definitely sympathized with Edmond Dantes for all that he lost, so definitely recommend.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2003

    Not the best translation

    First off let me say that I loved this book, but when I found out that it did not include the story of Danglers when he left, I was upset. I feel that the Danglers part was a major part to the story and the translator of this version should have included it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2002

    My favorite novel...

    ...that I continuously read over and over again. A classic about revenge - a dish best served cold.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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