Customer Reviews for

The Count of Monte Cristo (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

111 out of 121 people found this review helpful.

Best Version I Have Seen

I have noticed that most of the reviews for this edition speak about Dumas' work in general, but I have to make a point that Robin Buss makes in the beginning of the book: almost every other version of The Count of Monte Cristo in English is either an abridgment or the ...
I have noticed that most of the reviews for this edition speak about Dumas' work in general, but I have to make a point that Robin Buss makes in the beginning of the book: almost every other version of The Count of Monte Cristo in English is either an abridgment or the product of Victorian editing.

This book has to be praised for the mere fact that Buss went back to the original French and translated it wonderfully, not abridging or altering the essential storyline.

As of now, this is the only edition of such caliber that I know of, and for now, it is all I recommend that people buy.

Avoid all other editions and publishers, or at least make sure whether the one you want is an abridgment or not.

posted by akihiko on October 1, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

43 out of 59 people found this review helpful.

Abridged Versions Dont tell the whole story

I had purchased a copy of this book because I love the story of the Count of Monte Cristo and wanted a version in hard back. It was only after I was reading through it when I noticed stuff different from my penguin soft back version did I flip to the front to discover ...
I had purchased a copy of this book because I love the story of the Count of Monte Cristo and wanted a version in hard back. It was only after I was reading through it when I noticed stuff different from my penguin soft back version did I flip to the front to discover the book was abridged. Who ever edited this book had to have been stupid because they did a horrible job of editing. I could understand cutting material which isn't critical to the story. Examples from the unabridged version included 'How to rescue a gardener from dormice who are eating his peaches' and 'the road for Belgium.' However to deliberately omit major portions which are critical to the whole of the story is wrong and causes the whole story to be misrepresented. Major portions which were omitted included the the final judgment of Danglars at the hands of Vampa, and also the story of Andrea Cavalcanti and how he ties to both Villefort and Danglars. Even the comic book version of the story I read as a kid managed to included all of these. This abridged version of this book isnt worth the paper it is written on. I am extremely disappointed at Barnes and Noble for putting their name on crap like this. Don't waste your money, go get yourself a penguin classics version instead and read the whole story.

posted by Anonymous on October 7, 2008

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  • Posted March 18, 2009

    An old age book for new age readers

    In the Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas, a French sailor runs into some hard times. It all started when his captain on his ship got brain fever and dies. The Captain's last request is that Edmond goes to the Isle of Elba to deliver a letter and take whatever is received and deliver that also. When Edmond returns to Marseilles and prepares to deliver his letter. He decides he will travel to Paris after he marries his beautiful fiancée Mercedes. Also along with the great joy of about to become a married man Edmond is told by the ship owner that he will become the new captain of the ship. With all of this good news Edmond makes some rivals unknowingly. These rivals conspire together to write an anonymous letter to the public prosecutor telling of how Edmond had a letter from Napoleon to the Bonapartist party of Paris.Due to this letter Edmond was arrested and sent to the public prosecutor. While there the deputy public prosecutor, Villefort, interrogates Edmond, discovers that Edmond was innocent and is about to release him when he finds out the letter from Napoleon was to his father. Villefort does not want to be one day blackmailed with this information so he sends Edmond to a prison at the Chateau d'If to die without ever knowing what put him in there.
    Edmond spends fourteen years in this prison during which he meets a priest who holds the secret to a hidden treasure. The priest teaches Edmond many things in exchange for his help on a tunnel which is to be their escape. But the priest does not escape with Edmond instead dies allowing Edmond a unique opportunity for escape. Edmond does escape and find the treasure the priest told him about and then uses the fortune he receives to extract revenge from the people who stole fourteen years of his life; Danglars the second mate, Fernand the jealous friend, and Villefort who accused him wrongly. The rest of the book explains how Edmond creates and executes his great revenge.
    The best part of this book was the plot. Dumas does a great job of weaving a tangled web that becomes unraveled by the Count of Monte Cristo's (Edmond) revenge. The complex way the Count using this entire web to fit his purpose makes for an intoxicating read. The worst part of this book was the changes that Edmond had to go through to achieve his revenge. Edmond went from enjoying all that life had given him to becoming a cruel, vindictive man who revels in the demise of his enemies. Edmond became the Count of Monte Cristo who knows no bounds and cannot be stopped by anyone other than God. The Count made his self into a person who smiled at the most terrible sights. All the Count had was his revenge and what that revenge had made him into.
    This book was a great read due to the involved plot. Edmond used all his resources in unique ways and provided interesting outlooks on life due to his altered personality. Also Dumas made it so all of Edmond's enemies had great schemes with each other so if you took one down the others followed quickly. Edmond's revenge would not have been as great if the other characters had not left themselves in positions that if uncovered would ruin them. These subtle turns in the book add suspense and extra umph to an already interesting book.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Reading!

    I had no idea when I purchased this book that it was abridged; however, that did not cause me to enjoy this novel any less! I was engrossed with the story from about the 5th page! This book has it all, jealousy, love and retribution. What an excellent introduction for me to the world of Dumas! I can see why The Count of Monte Cristo has been one of the most popular books in Europe. I wish I had picked up this wonderful classic earlier!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2013

    Dashing young Edmond Dant├Ęs, a sailor from Marseilles, France, h

    Dashing young Edmond Dantès, a sailor from Marseilles, France, has everything. At age nineteen, he is engaged to a beautiful woman named Mercedes, is about to become the captain of a ship, and is well liked by almost everyone. But in 1815, the fateful year of Napoleon’s brief return to power, he unknowingly carries a politically incriminating letter home, merely as a favor to his dying captain, and his perfect life is shattered when he is framed by jealous rivals—Danglars, who wants his position as captain; Fernand, who wants his girlfriend; and the deputy procrureur de Villefort, who wants to keep secret the fact that his father, to whom the letter was addressed, is a Napoleonist. As a result of their betrayal, Dantes is thrown into a dark prison cell at the Château d'If for fourteen years. There he befriends a fellow-prisoner, the Abbé Faria, and learns of a vast fortune on the island of Monte Cristo. Following the Abbe’s death, Dantes escapes, locates the fortune, and becomes “the Count of Monte Cristo.”

    Several years later, the Count comes to Paris where all three of his betrayers now live. Danglars is a rich banker. Fernand, who married Mercedes, is now the Count de Morcerf. And de Villefort is the chief procureur of the King. Dantes seeks both justice and revenge. How will he go about achieving his goals? And what will be the results? The Count of Monte Cristo began serialization in the Journal des Débats in 1844 and was published in book form in 1846, shortly after Dumas’s most famous book, The Three Musketeers, and did even better than its predecessor. The book is not for young children. There are several references to drinking alcohol and using tobacco. The language is not too bad, but the words “God” and “Lord” are occasionally used as interjections. Three individuals contemplate suicide, and two other individuals actually commit it. One instance of ballroom dancing occurs. While no overt sex scenes are described, as in The Three Musketeers, a couple of references to men who have mistresses are found. A character literally goes insane. Seventh grade and up is suggested for the reading level.

    While some might see only justice in thwarting the plans of evil men, revenge is clearly and obviously the theme of the story. However, there are instances where Dantes in mercy relents from his desire for revenge, and in the end he learns that seeking vengeance can cause some unintended yet hurtful consequences for those whom he loves. References to seeking God’s will and trusting in the Lord abound. The beginning and ending are both quite exciting; the middle drags a bit slowly and is a little confusing with all the new names, but, of course, the information is necessary in understanding the conclusion. In Homeschooling Today magazine, Betty Burger wrote, “This story’s plot is crafted so superbly and intricately that nothing can be left out without damaging the story. Read an unabridged version. It is worth all 123 chapters.” Well, if you have infinite wealth to afford a book with 1000+ pages and unlimited time to devote to reading it, that is all right, but for those of us who are lacking in both funds and time, the abridged version, in which the removed sections are explained in brief detail by footnotes, is satisfactory.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2012

    The Count of Monte Cristo was a suspenseful novel that took plac

    The Count of Monte Cristo was a suspenseful novel that took place in Marseilles, France. The story about a man named Edmond Dantes, who is framed for crime by three men who are jealous of his success and happiness. The novel had some very interesting parts, and I learned a lot about the history in France during the time after Napoleon’s rule. Although the book was very long, it was never too dull. The vocabulary was difficult at times, but I learned many new words. My favorite part of the novel was Edmond’s escape from prison. The feeling of not knowing if Edmond would survive or not, was extremely dramatic. It was written magnificently with many details, which made it easy to visualize what was happening.
    Edmond’s struggle with revenge and learning how he hurt so many people around him was eye opening. I realized that though it might feel good to get revenge on people who have wronged you; it is possibly not the best choice. Edmond got carried away with his revenge and it really showed in the novel. His actions hurt many innocent people. When Caderousse gave Edmond vital information without knowing who he really was, it taught me to be careful about what you say to strangers. You never know what another person will do with the information you give him or her.
    The ending of the book was great because it showed a different side of Edmond. He finally realized his mistakes, and he reconsidered the people who had caused his downfall. Overall, I would recommend this book to young adults. Some parts were confusing and hard to understand, so I would not recommend this book to the younger readers. I think this book teaches many lessons, and it is a good tale about revenge and heartbreak.



    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2014

    Good read

    It's a long book about 1200 pages and some of the story probably could've been left out but it's enjoyable and it if you've only seen the movie I'd recommend it, the story is different and very good.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Cl&sigma<_>ck

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2014

    Hope

    To monstrrs not anything inappropriate.))) Sleepa

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Fausto

    "Yes?"

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Vix

    "Cause l like staring at people." She admitted, flicking an ear.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Skyler

    A handsome elf stepped in. He was followed by a tiger.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    Russia

    "Indeed." She whispered as she stepped out of the shadows from the silent Tavern.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2014

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2014

    Vix

    Flicked her ear with a yawn, still looking straight at them. "Can l help you?" She sighed and raised a brow slowly, still leaning against the wooden bean.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    Fausto

    Walks in and looks at the empty tavern and sighs, walking back out

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Endie

    Sat on a beam.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2014

    Endie

    T-T "Geh."

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2013

    Too long but still a good plot

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    Good

    Good read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    Classic

    This book is possibly the best book of the 20th century. Absolutely a classic.








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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    Providence

    One of the best books ever written. This version is OK, but the reader who wants the WHOLE story will read the UNabridged version. This book has a little (or a lot) of EVERYTHING a good books should have. Love, hate, hope, despair, rewards for good, and sweet vengence for those who practice wickedness.
    I have read this book at least 5 times, and it just keeps getting better.

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