Customer Reviews for

Crazy for God: How I Grew Up as One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) of It Back

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
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(10)

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(6)

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(6)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

Life is messy, even for Christians

This a sometimes serious, surprisingly funny, but honest portrayal of what life was like growing up as the son of one of the most well-know evangelical leaders of the 1960's and '70's. As the son of a minister myself, I can relate to being 'folded into' into the ministr...
This a sometimes serious, surprisingly funny, but honest portrayal of what life was like growing up as the son of one of the most well-know evangelical leaders of the 1960's and '70's. As the son of a minister myself, I can relate to being 'folded into' into the ministry of my parents. I can also relate to having lots of strangers in my home night and day and a sense, whether real or imagined, that the my parents thought 'the work of the Lord' was more important than me or my interests. I can remember, like Frank Schaeffer, being forbidden to dance, go to movies or even join the cub scouts because it was on the same night as mid-week prayer service. I , like Schaeffer, felt different from all the other kids. And like Frank Schaeffer, my parents had their battles and my preacher dad had an explosive temper. Like Frank's dad, my dad never showed his temper outside the home. It made me also question my faith and Christianity. Unlike Frank however, I now consider myself an agnostic for several reasons, only one being the way I was raised.

posted by Anonymous on April 4, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

Should have waited

This book is an interesting look into the life of Frankie Schaeffer the son of prominent Christians Edith and Francis Schaeffer of L'Abri fame and gives the reader a perspective of the ups and downs of being the offspring of extremely busy, driven people during an excit...
This book is an interesting look into the life of Frankie Schaeffer the son of prominent Christians Edith and Francis Schaeffer of L'Abri fame and gives the reader a perspective of the ups and downs of being the offspring of extremely busy, driven people during an exciting period of time in American politics. In addition, Schaeffer's writing style means easy reading, and insightful, interesting, and humorous takes on some sensitive topics. But, I rated this book just ok because when you get down to it, most of the book is about what appears to be self-justification for questionable behavior on his part. In striving to justify himself he trashes the world around him, including his parents and ends up bringing their honesty and integrity into question. In the process he proceeds to mock not only them, who he confessed loved him dearly, but also associates and teachers. And, he does so in a manner that can only be termed ¿cruel¿ especially to those unable to defend themselves at this point in time. To his credit he does manage to recognize and confess some of his failures, but seems to lack the fortitude to acknowledge they were based on his desires, not his parents or peers. After all, he admits to being the dominant personally who was driven to have his way. And, by taking advantage of his parents love for him, always seemed to get it to the detriment of the L¿Abri community. As someone who respected Edith and Francis Schaeffer particularly for their work in the area of Christian Apologetics, and having talked with a number of individuals whose lives were changed for the positive by having had the opportunity to spend time at L¿Abri, I found his treatment of his parents and many of his friends, disappointing. It is an interesting book, but I think it may have been written too soon. Perhaps the writer is still on a journey of sorts when it comes to deciding who he really is and what he believes about his parents and the events that transpired. I wish he had waited a few more years down the road. Time has a way of putting things in perspective and I suspect the picture painted by Schaeffer is a bit distorted by guilt and perhaps disappointment in self. I would like to see him write more on the same topic 5 years from now.

posted by Anonymous on June 18, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2008

    Should have waited

    This book is an interesting look into the life of Frankie Schaeffer the son of prominent Christians Edith and Francis Schaeffer of L'Abri fame and gives the reader a perspective of the ups and downs of being the offspring of extremely busy, driven people during an exciting period of time in American politics. In addition, Schaeffer's writing style means easy reading, and insightful, interesting, and humorous takes on some sensitive topics. But, I rated this book just ok because when you get down to it, most of the book is about what appears to be self-justification for questionable behavior on his part. In striving to justify himself he trashes the world around him, including his parents and ends up bringing their honesty and integrity into question. In the process he proceeds to mock not only them, who he confessed loved him dearly, but also associates and teachers. And, he does so in a manner that can only be termed ¿cruel¿ especially to those unable to defend themselves at this point in time. To his credit he does manage to recognize and confess some of his failures, but seems to lack the fortitude to acknowledge they were based on his desires, not his parents or peers. After all, he admits to being the dominant personally who was driven to have his way. And, by taking advantage of his parents love for him, always seemed to get it to the detriment of the L¿Abri community. As someone who respected Edith and Francis Schaeffer particularly for their work in the area of Christian Apologetics, and having talked with a number of individuals whose lives were changed for the positive by having had the opportunity to spend time at L¿Abri, I found his treatment of his parents and many of his friends, disappointing. It is an interesting book, but I think it may have been written too soon. Perhaps the writer is still on a journey of sorts when it comes to deciding who he really is and what he believes about his parents and the events that transpired. I wish he had waited a few more years down the road. Time has a way of putting things in perspective and I suspect the picture painted by Schaeffer is a bit distorted by guilt and perhaps disappointment in self. I would like to see him write more on the same topic 5 years from now.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    emotional thinking

    This guy based his crusade against abortion on emotional thinking. It did not take into account the horrendous consequences of an unwanted pregnancy or child. Nor how it would split the US apart. I believe he wrote this to absolve his conscious from being a general screw-up when he was a wild teen and getting a girl to go to bed with him and getting pregnant. Also, his subsequent mea culpa for have too much ego and getting all the money from his presentations, PLEASE give me a break one whole paragraph. Then he tantalizingly throws out barbs against Billy Graham, James Dobson, Jerry Fallwell, Pat Robertson, etc. But these are just acusations of greed and averice (which most thinking progressives are very aware of). But the writer does nothing to back up his allegations.
    Finally, he champions the unborn but does nothing for the born. There is the rub. Also, he starts in about partial birth abortions it is obvious he knows nothing about which he speaks. I suggest a volunteering in a big metropolitan hosp for about a month and see how many of these are done. I was in nursing for 35 years and attended many birthings and not once did I see this procedure done. My understanding is it is only done in extreamus to save the mother's life and cannot be reconciled any other way. I would suggest before Mr. Shaefer goes on another money making crusade (that he does not have a clear understanding of) that he do some research first. I might add a lot of research.
    Thank you

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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