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The Crucible

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Interesting...

I had to read this book for my Honors english class, and at first it was a bit weird, like I kind of didn't understand what was happening. But as I read on, it became a wonderful book that I recommend to any High School student, looking for a good read.

posted by Anonymous on March 7, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

19 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

Beware of the Cheaper Version!

For the last four years I have taught "The Crucible" to high school Juniors using a class set of the Penguin Classics version of the play. Needing more copies, I placed an order for some with my school's librarian. Thinking he'd save money, he bought this version.

...
For the last four years I have taught "The Crucible" to high school Juniors using a class set of the Penguin Classics version of the play. Needing more copies, I placed an order for some with my school's librarian. Thinking he'd save money, he bought this version.

*It is not the same version of the play.*

This version of the play reads more like a script (complete with detailed stage directions and set design/layout) and is better suited for performing the play, not reading it in a classroom setting.

Differences:
* This play is divided into 2 main Acts, not the original 4
* Miller's commentary and character descriptions are omitted (vital sections if you want to link the play to McCarthyism)
* The dialogue is different; certain (sometimes key) lines are omitted.

Bottom Line: It's an inferior copy of the play, and it is worth the few extra dollars to buy the other version.

posted by bekmort on June 29, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2007

    Interesting...

    I had to read this book for my Honors english class, and at first it was a bit weird, like I kind of didn't understand what was happening. But as I read on, it became a wonderful book that I recommend to any High School student, looking for a good read.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2007

    Great Book, Recommend It

    I read this book in fourth grade, and I recently read it again. I forogt how interesting it was. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read a realistic story about a major event that occured during the 17th century.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 23, 2011

    Quite An Excellent Book!

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller was a tale of the the witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts during the late 17th century. It was an interesting way to learn about the witchcraft trials without having the feel of reading a textbook. I feel that this was a wonderfully written piece, and that it wasn't difficult to read like other books about this time period. I would reccommend this to anyone looking for something about the witchcraft trials, or anyone who just wanted a good read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 17, 2011

    Enjoyable Play

    When reading the Crucible by Arthur Miller, I found that it was rather interesting to read. Even though that it was not my favorite book, there came a yearning to follow through with the book, to read till the end. The Crucible is a fictional play, based upon the witchcraft which had taken place during the Salem Witch Trials. This is always intriguing when an author takes past events and creates a fictional masterpiece. I was rather pleased with this play, but I will not be reading it any time soon, but it is worth the money to keep in the book case for later use.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The crucible

    this book is just an amazing book about true events that took place during the salem witch trials. This book shows the use of many scapegoats to avoid persecution. I am a history nut and i know that during this time if you said you were a witch you would be spared and used to find other witches. If u claimed innocence then you would be hung as a withc because you must be lying. I could reccomend this book to anyone who loves history and great plays.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2015

    A Classic of the American Theatre

    This has been one of my favorite plays for decades - since I was in the seventh grade. Even then I knew how egregious its historical accuracy is - the Proctors were really 60 and 51, Abigail was 11, etc. - it's still a powerful play. I'm auditioning for the show in two weeks!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    A very good interpretation to an event that's changed dramatical

    A very good interpretation to an event that's changed dramatically over time. It is NOT a factual piece so if you are reading this for the sake of knowing what happened in the Salem Witch Trials this is not the book you want to start off with. It's still enjoyable if you are looking for a roller coaster ride that brings imagination to 1692 Salem.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2013

    worth it

    Im not even done with it but i love it and cant wait to see the movie...the only thing there is, is that it is kinda hard to follow if you do not pay attention to what you are reading...but other than that it is a really great book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    Can anyone tell me how many pages this book is? Thanks :)

    Pages?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 11, 2011

    The Crucible

    Set in colonial Salem, Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" takes a tragic event and brings it to life. There's no doubt that the Salem Witch Trials was a terrible spot on history. Hundreds of accused witches were hung or burned at the stake. In "The Crucible" several young girls accuse hundreds of people out of fear. They were caught doing inappropriate things and blamed their innocent neighbors of following the devil. While I found Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" to be dull and hard to follow, "The Crucible" was exciting and breath-taking. The way Arthur Miller is able to paint the setting in the reader's mind is amazing. He really transports you to the time period. The way they spoke is sometimes a little difficult to understand, but it is nonetheless beautifully written. One of the things I found most challenging about "Death of a Salesman" was that it was in play format. It made it hard for me to follow and understand. However, "The Crucible" (which was written in the same format) was, I found, easily comprehensible and very entertaining. Arthur Miller was a magnificent author and playwright, then and now. "The Crucible" was a thrilling play that will remain a classic.

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  • Posted December 30, 2010

    Good Play

    It really gives you an insightful view on matters of right and wrong, cowardice and chivalry, and truth and falsehoods. Easy to understand. Just great. The ending makes you feel sad; it pulls at your heartstrings. Watch the movie as well; it's very much like the play.

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  • Posted May 5, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    What a Wonderful World...

    As a child I was home schooled. One of the things I learned about was romanticism, modernism, and realism. Naturally one of the books we covered was The Crucible. I can remember reading it with my mother, and now that I am reading it in school, I find it even more fascinating. Some would think this was just about Puritan age stuff and about the Salem trials, but I believe it to be a reflection on modern society. Maybe I'm alone in that thought, but I do. If you compare the scandals, the lying, the cheating- all to modern politics, or even your neighborhood, they are quite similar if not the same. I think this is a must read for anyone looking for a quick fix book with some depth.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    Good play

    I read this for my AP Language and Composition class and enjoyed the book overall. It will engage your mind and take you beyond the salem witch trials.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Denial in Miller and wilson

    Although two completely different stories, The Crucible and The Piano Lesson share a common theme: denial.
    The Crucible takes place during the Salem Witch trials which was itself a time of denial. The town of Salem had accused innocent people left and right of witchcraft and refused to believe that anyone was innocent. Abigail and the group of girls also show denial because they constantly refuse that they had done witchcraft, despite the fact that pretty much everyone in the town saw them doing it in the woods. Another example is the love triangle between Abigail, John Proctor, and Elizabeth Proctor. John Proctor constantly refuses that he ever had any feelings for Abigail, even though the reader is made aware of this affair in the story.
    The Piano Lesson is also a story of denial. Berniece, one of the main characters, refuses to sell the piano. She is in constant denial throughout the story because of her refusal to sell the piano. Boy Willie is also in denial because he refuses to believe in Sutter's ghost, even though his spirit has appeared many times in the play. Going back to Berniece, there is another scene of denial between her and Avery. Berniece keeps telling herself that she doesn't want to get into a relationship with Avery because she misses her husband. Avery tries to tell her to believe in the power of God and it will all be alright, but Berniece doesn't really do much about that and instead keeps crying to everyone.
    Although two completely different stories, The Crucible and The Piano Lesson share a common theme: denial. The stories main characters are filled with constant denials, in many ways than one. They all share the common theme that they refuse to believe that something is real.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    Freedom in The Awakening and The crucible by Kmirra

    Freedom is a privilege that most people long to have. Freedom gives you the right to say what you want and be what you want. Long ago, freedom was not always an option for people, but today our government does a lot to make sure we can have freedom in our lives. In The Awakening by Kate Chopin, freedom is a common theme to the book, and also in the book, The Crucible.
    In the awakening, the author tries to focus on the rights of the women. To have rights, we must have freedom first. Without freedom, we have nothing. The main character in this book fought for her rights as a woman. She felt like women were being cheated into getting the same things men could get. Also, she tries to focus on the freedom of speech, not just for women but for everyone. Some people were looked down upon for maybe social status or economical situation, not just the gender. This book enclosed a lot of good examples of having freedom.
    In the crucible, freedom is very important. There is much talk in the town of Salem about witch craft and affairs. Some people may say that people have the right to do witch craft if it is what they believe. Back in the time of this book however, witch craft was looked down upon, even illegal, and can result to death. Sometimes this related to the rights of the children, also. Parents did not always trust their children to go play with friends because of the recent witch craft activity. Therefore, their freedom to do what they wanted was taken away. Some of the main characters in this book had an affair. Freedom is portrayed here but not in the same way. With these people having so much freedom, they were able to do something that was not right.
    Freedom was given as a privilege in these books to the characters; however, sometimes freedom wasn't given at all. These people fought for what they believed in and for the freedom they deserved. The crucible and the awakening are great examples of books that include acts of wanting freedom.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    Loyalty in The Crucible by S.Lang

    Loyalty
    Loyalty is very important in everyday life, even though most people don't realize it. Throughout the books "The Crucible" and "The Awakening", a very common theme is loyalty. These two books show how important loyalty is throughout every page and try to teach a lesson to people.
    In "The Crucible", there is an extreme lack of loyalty between the girls, their parents, and the people of the community. One example is when the girls lied to everyone about having an encounter with the devil. They tried to convince Reverend Parris that Betty has never seen the devil or worshiped him. The girls blamed everything on innocent people they did not like because they did not want to be held responsible for their actions. Another example of lack of loyalty is when John Proctor lied to his wife and had an affair with the young girl Abigail Williams. John Proctor's wife Elizabeth was crushed when she found out what happened between her husband and their servant. In "The Crucible", the young girls did everything they could to try to get the innocent people in trouble and this is a big case of lack of loyalty. One example of this is when Abigail framed Elizabeth by telling Mary Warren to give a doll to Elizabeth. This doll was actually a voodoo doll and Abigail was purposely setting up Elizabeth to get back at her for making her husband come back to her. Throughout the book, there are pages upon pages of deceit and that shows you how important it is to be loyal.
    "The Awakening" was crammed with pages of loyalty and treachery. One example of a lack of loyalty is when Edna Pontellier was falling in love with another man named Robert. She didn't tell her husband, Leonce, about how much she liked Robert and this would have crushed his feelings if he knew. In "The Awakening", Edna went against Leonce's decision and bought a little house for her to enjoy her peace and quiet and do things that she enjoyed. Leonce did not approve of this action at all. Another example of Edna not being loyal was when she started seeing a man named Alcee Arobin. Alcee always went for married woman and Edna was one of his most valuable women. Edna's husband would have been extremely upset with her if he found out she wasn't being loyal to him.
    This shows you how important loyalty is in a relationship between friends or even lovers. Loyalty is very important in everyday life, and most people don't realize it.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

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    I Also Recommend:

    Greed by Cgriffin

    There were many dominant themes in both The Piano Lesson and The Crucible, but one that stuck out at me in both novels was greed. There is a lot of greed involved in both novels although it may be shown in different ways. It is important because greed is what thickens the plot and makes it interesting, and in The Crucible, greed is what makes the plot.
    In The Crucible, a young girl has an affair with an older man. She then falls in love with him and out of greed, accuses his wife of being a witch. Many of the other girls do this in the novel, only it is because they have something else to gain from doing it, apart from love. Although this is what fuels the story, there are other examples of greed shown as well.
    Paris, who is the town's reverend, moved from a place where he was paid to the smaller town of Salem, he becomes greedy in the sense that he needs money, a nice house, and other valuable but otherwise unimportant things. This causes some of the town's folk to lose respect for him and even stop going to mass, which later causes them to be accuses of witchcraft.
    Another way greed is shown is through the town's folk themselves. Some of them begin to accuse each other of witch craft in order to obtain their land. If one villager has a border dispute with another, he could just accuse him of witch craft and take all of his land.
    Although no one loses there life in The Piano Lesson, the greed is just as dominant a theme. In the pursuit of money and land, Boy Willie tries to sell a Piano that has great sentimental and historical value that belongs to his sister, Berniece. Even though he does not succeed, he pays no regard to how Berniece feels about the piano. All he wants and cares about is money to buy land up north.
    On the other hand, Berniece shows a level of greed in her stubbornness to sell the piano. She pays no regards to his reasoning and is extremely ignorant of anything he has to say. Although the Piano has extreme sentimental value, her brother wanted to have money that he could make a living off of and she outright refused.
    The last example was never actually confirmed to be true in the story itself, but it is the idea is left in the book that Boy Willie pushed Sutter, the former owner of the piece of land he is striving to purchase, into a well, causing him to eventually drown. This would be another example of how Boy Willie is willing to do anything just to have money and land, even murder. It is never actually stated that he pushed Sutter in the well, but the fact that everyone close to him believes that he did it shows that he would be greedy enough to do it. His closest relatives and friends know him better than everyone else so they can easily judge his character.
    As you can see, although the plots of The Crucible and The Piano Lesson are a great deal different, they still have the common theme of greed weaved into every twist and turn. Whether it results in death or despair, the cause is still for the selfish gain of a small number of people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2009

    Truth in The Crucible and The Awakening

    The Awakening and The Crucible both share the nominal theme of truth within their stories. The conflict, characterization, and actions of the characters in both resolutions of the novels share equal importance in the theme of truth.
    In the novel, The Crucible, the conflict of the story is between Abigail Williams and John Proctor. The conflict revolves around finding the truth about if the two actually had an affair with each other. This conflict in the story represents the theme of truth because throughout the story John tried to deny the fact that he had an affair with Abigail. Within Salem an individual's private life, in the case John's private life, must remain secret due to the fact that any wrong doing marked you against god. Abigail William's characterization also represents the theme of truth. Abigail tries to deceive the jury and Salem witch hunters by accusing John Proctor's wife of witchcraft as well as Tituba, a slave for the family. Abigail's personality and actions throughout the novel of being non truthful and deceiving others only brings her misfortune in the novel, and through this it also represents the nominal theme of truth in the story. John Proctor's actions at the end of the novel by finally confessing to the jury that he did commit adultery with Abigail Williams led to him electing to be hung. John's actions of telling the truth emphasize the importance of the nominal theme of truth in the novel because John Proctor dies with integrity instead of continuing to not be truthful.
    The Awakening also contains the nominal theme of truth within its story. The conflict in the story is mainly between Edna and herself as she tries to discover her true self. Edna Pontellier discovers her true identity and acknowledges her emotional and sexual desires. For example, when she has an affair with Alcee, she discovers her true sexual desires in order to become free from her husband's (Robert) resistance. Edna's actions also represent the importance of truth. While vacationing in the Grand Isle her main purpose there was to find her true strengths. When she swims for the first time in Grand Isle she discovers her own strength, in which this also represents her journey of finding the truth within herself. She also expresses her true identity by learning three languages and expressing herself through learning how to play the piano from Mademoiselle Reisz. The stories nominal theme of truth is mainly shown in the resolution of The Awakening because Edna finally finds the truth within her, and when she finds that no one understands her true self it causes her to end her own life by drowning herself.
    In conclusion, the conflict, characterization, and actions of the characters in both resolutions of the novels share equal importance in the theme of truth. Each story's plot revolves around the character's interaction with the truth. Both novels express importance in looking and displaying one's true feelings and actions, which is why Truth is an important nominal theme within both The Crucible and The Awakening.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Loyalty in The Piano Lesson and The Crucible SHayes

    Loyalty can be defined and seen in The Crucible and The Piano Lesson in many perspectives such as loyalty to the past in the form of an object, loyalty in marriage, and loyalty to another's life and fate.

    In the Piano Lesson, Bernice seems to acquire a loyalty to the family piano. The piano has a historical, ancestral, family past that tells a story throughout the generations. Her loyalty to the past is represented through her love yet fear of the piano. It defines her life and continues to replay memories of what used to be.

    The Crucible seems to show a much different side of loyalty. There is the loyalty between and man and wife that could be betrayed and the question whether loyalty should be taken into consideration while taking the fate of another into your own hands. John Proctor had a choice whether he would be loyal to his wife Elizabeth or to show infidelity with Abigail. His choice to overlook loyalty resulted in an undesirable fate. While others had the choice on whether or not to help their friend or loved one, wrongly accusing someone of witchcraft is being disloyal to yourself and those around you who are involved. Elizabeth Proctor attempts to be loyal to her marriage when given the option to help save her husband in court. She tries to help him by making him seem innocent. The verdict was validated when the couple's stories did not match up. Elizabeth then decides to stop instigating and persuading, and lets him choose what he thinks is right, a death worth dying for to clear his name. She was loyal to his wishes and to their marriage.

    In conclusion, loyalty can come in many different forms. You can be faithful and dependable or you can be loyal to something else that defines you. As shown in these novels, loyalty can be shown in different ways; loyalty to your history and memories, loyalty to nuptials, and loyalty to another's living and destiny. This theme shows to be evident in multiple occasions throughout these narratives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2009

    The Crucible was awesome. I loved it.

    The Crucible was a very interesting book. Although the context was about witchcraft, the context between the lines was about an issue going on in the time of Arthur Miller. The Crucible was a play in the 16oo's, in Salem, Massachusetts. The tone of the book was somewhat dramatic and serious and the language in The Crucible was biblical. My opinion about the book was that it held the audience attention and wasn't as dead as I thought it would be. I really never thought I would like the type of book like The Crucible.
    The Crucible mainly was about townspeople of Salem being blamed of witchcraft. A couple of girls were caught doing activities that are known for witches to do. Rather than going down by themselves, they would say that other people were witches as well. One of the girls that were caught up in the witchcraft was the daughter of a Reverend. For most people it's not a surprise that a reverend's daughter is caught in drama but this reverend and his daughter was more out of the ordinary than most reverends and their daughter. In my opinion, this novel was out of the ordinary and I believe that's what makes the book so much more interesting. Throughout the novel, you learned more about the main characters and events that went between characters.
    One event that caught every reader's attention was the affair between John Proctor and Elizabeth. I believe that a little drama, or conflict, brings more attraction to the book and that's exactly what the affair did to the novel. Also, the author, Arthur Miller, didn't leave just throw the affair in just like that; he added more conflict to the affair. I think that the affair between the two characters is what really made me not want to put the book down because I wanted to see what happened at the end.
    As I stated before, I never imagined that I would enjoy a book like this but I would definitely recommend this book to a friend. When I first read started the book, I was doubting the fact that I would like the book because it's not the type of genre I would read but it was actually good. It doesn't matter what genre of books you are into because this book catches everyone's attention. One thing I would like to add is that Arthur Miller was a creative author with this book. I say that because I could imagine this book as a TV show or a movie that would be a big hit. Also, he put together things that I don't see everyday.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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