Customer Reviews for

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

25 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

Wow!

I knew from the very start i was going to like this book. Haddon, the author, writes this book from the point of view of an autistic child. I personally know people that are autistic and Haddon did a fantastic job of capturing day-to-day life of an autistic child. Wh...
I knew from the very start i was going to like this book. Haddon, the author, writes this book from the point of view of an autistic child. I personally know people that are autistic and Haddon did a fantastic job of capturing day-to-day life of an autistic child. When i started reading the book, i realized that it would not be like any book I have ever read. Like any book it started of with chapter one, however, the next chapter was numbered three. In the beginning of the chapter the boy (who is writing this book) went of on a tangent explaining that the chapters will be prime numbers because prime numbers make him feel calm. I enjoyed it because some books get boring because they have a plot and all you do is read about it. However, every other chapter in this book diverted from the main plot to talk about something random, because this is how the mind of an autistic child works. Throughout the book i found my self almost getting annoyed by the way the boy acted, then i realized this is because the author did such a great job of captivating the real life of an autistic child. This is written by a British man so the language is very harsh. If you want a great book to read, this is it

posted by NRtrack on May 20, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

17 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

Ick.

I'm not going to say I'm the authority on Asperger Syndrome (I have it and read a lot about it, but that still doesn't mean I know EVERYTHING about it), but... ugh. This book gets so much of it completely wrong. It's quite depressing to think that this is now THE go-to ...
I'm not going to say I'm the authority on Asperger Syndrome (I have it and read a lot about it, but that still doesn't mean I know EVERYTHING about it), but... ugh. This book gets so much of it completely wrong. It's quite depressing to think that this is now THE go-to fiction book for those curious (ha!) about the disorder.

Part of my problem is that the writing is immensely frustrating, but, hey, I could get past that if I liked any other major thing about the book. Unfortunately, the protagonist irked me to the point of wanting to throw the book at the nearest wall, and the people around him are even worse, if you want to believe it. Perhaps I should have more empathy for Christopher if he's on the spectrum, but it just didn't happen. He didn't feel real to me most of the time, and when he did, he was a smug little jerk. (The whole thing with him carrying a knife around and contemplating stabbing people if they touched him was the most sickening thing about the book to me; it's, hands down, the most vile "stereotype" in a chock-full of them.) The plot is a mess, too, and very soap-opera like. And the ending? Ridiculous, anticlimactic, and undeserved.

I like some minor things about the book, though. The cover is one. The use of footnotes is the other (I love footnotes, honestly). And hey, even the protagonist being hard (if not impossible) to like is somewhat realistic. (Spend a few hours with a room full of kids on the spectrum and you'll get the idea; a lot of us are really frustrating.) But in terms of portrayal of AS? No, no, no, no, NO. Maybe it's better at getting into the head of a person with "classic" autism, but I wouldn't know much about that. (If they'd said it involved regular autism and not AS, I might not have such a strong dislike for it.) For its time it's not bad at what it sets out to do; unfortunately, many much better books have sprung up in recent years that are much better at getting into the mind of an autistic character. Read this if you must, but I'd heartily recommend reading "Anything But Typical" instead. It's much more well-written, the characters are likable, and it's not filled to the brim with stereotypes.

posted by WeirdMovieFan on February 12, 2010

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  • Posted May 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wow!

    I knew from the very start i was going to like this book. Haddon, the author, writes this book from the point of view of an autistic child. I personally know people that are autistic and Haddon did a fantastic job of capturing day-to-day life of an autistic child. When i started reading the book, i realized that it would not be like any book I have ever read. Like any book it started of with chapter one, however, the next chapter was numbered three. In the beginning of the chapter the boy (who is writing this book) went of on a tangent explaining that the chapters will be prime numbers because prime numbers make him feel calm. I enjoyed it because some books get boring because they have a plot and all you do is read about it. However, every other chapter in this book diverted from the main plot to talk about something random, because this is how the mind of an autistic child works. Throughout the book i found my self almost getting annoyed by the way the boy acted, then i realized this is because the author did such a great job of captivating the real life of an autistic child. This is written by a British man so the language is very harsh. If you want a great book to read, this is it

    25 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 19, 2009

    I'm Happy I Read It.

    I didn't know what to expect when I picked it up in the store, but I'd heard it was good. Only on about page ten, I found it hard to put down. No doubt, looking at life through an autistic boy's eyes was different, yet intriguing at the same time. Christopher Boone speaks his thoughts, and they made me think of life in a way I hadn't before. There were basically two plots in this book: Who killed Wellington, and if his mother's dead, where is he getting these letters from? Nonetheless, a good read that was full of mystery until the very end.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very entertaining

    I have to say, I have Asperger's Syndrome, and it is nothing like how described in the book. However, knowing that Mark Haddon stated he didn't know much about autism, and that it's just a story, I have to say I really like this book. It was touching and you really connect with the characters. Very enjoyable.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    AMAZZZIIING

    Everyone should read it. Sooo good

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Very well written

    This book is a very easy read. It is written from the perspective of a autistic fifteen year old. Although some people say this book was poorly written and did not have a good plot. The story was not a story to tell about how the autistic boy discovered who killed the dog, but rather a story to show what life is like for people with special needs. Having some experience with mentally disabled, I found this book super interesting. It shows that people with disabilities are not stupid. This boy was great at math. I know a guy with down's syndrome who could tell you the day of the week you were born on within five seconds of you telling him the date of your birth. This book was written to have a profound meaning. Instead it was written to show that people with disablities are still people.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2011

    Grabs att of my son

    Ok , I havent read this book, but my son who HATES to read was given this in his senior English class...he comes home everyday excited about the book. So my review is this...if it grabs him....it HAS to ne great!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 3, 2013

    Eccentric, brilliant, simple, easy and unique. A must read for a

    Eccentric, brilliant, simple, easy and unique. A must read for anyone wanting to understand how the autistic mind works. For a teacher like me, handling some kids under this condition, this opened up my eyes on the reality on what’s keeping these special people distinct. Brilliant work.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2011

    A different kind of adventure...

    Asperger Syndrome and an incident that leads to multiple discoveries, is what this book is about. The main character and narrator is Christopher John Francis Boone and he has Asperger Syndrome and he lives with his dad and his pet rat, Toby. His mom dies when he was young, or so he thought.
    Christopher isn¿t your average kid. He despises anything yellow or brown and loves the color red. For example, if someone gave him corn, he would not eat it, but tomato soup, he would. Christopher also will not eat what is on his plate if the foods are touching each other and he also doesn¿t like people touching him. On the bus to school each morning, Christopher counts cars. Not just any cars though, how many red cars in a row and how many yellow cars in a row. For example, three red cars in a row made it a quite a good day, four would make it a good day, and five would make it a super good day, but if it were four yellow cars in a row, it was a black day. Black days for Christopher would include is not speaking to anyone, sit on his own reading books, don¿t eat lunch, and take no risks. Maths is one thing Christopher is really good at. He takes time out of his stories to talk about interesting subjects that I¿m sure you never knew like knowing all the countries in the world and all their capitals along with knowing every prime number up to 7, 5057.
    Christopher started to write the book because of Wellington, a neighborhood dog. Christopher found Wellington dead one night and wants to find out who did it. In order to find out who killed Wellington, Christopher has to deal with many surprises that come with it. Even if it means learning that he has been lied to for a long time and an adventure to London.
    It¿s a good read and I would suggest it to anyone who is into books where the narrator gets off topic every now and again.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2010

    This is how kids with autism think!

    This author does a great job of getting inside the head of an autistic boy.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2013

    Do readers know what a review is?

    Why do readers feel they must write 3 - 5 pages of plot summary, revealing story elements and ruining it for those who want to read the book? Did these people ever read a review? A review is not a retelling of the story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    Love it!

    About fifteen year old autistic boy
    Sometimes harder to comprehend
    Swears quite a bit (say its more for older teens and young adults)
    Realy interesting
    Love this book so much
    But one question,
    Where does it say he has aspergers? Every one is ridiculing the author, did i miss something in the book?
    Anyway, realy good read
    Definetly recomended.
    Peace ; )

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2011

    Looovveeeee it

    This book is one of my favorites of all time. I got it from a library and one of my biggest regrets is not having had enough money to pay for this. The characters and story were great. I love reading this book.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 25, 2010

    Very intriguing storyline, and thought provoking subject.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the story line. The author provided a unique perspective on a challenging subject.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 16, 2013

    Excellent Book

    Excellent Book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Brilliant!

    I really enjoyed reading this book. It's been a while since I've sat down and enjoyed some good old brain exercise, and I'm glad I decided to read this one. Although I have to admit I did guess Father was the one to kill Wellington; however, it definitely didn't ruin the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2013

    Christopher Boone is a very peculiar 15-year-old, not because he

    Christopher Boone is a very peculiar 15-year-old, not because he is autistic, but because of the unique way in which he experiences the world around him. Christopher is a mathematically gifted and is a very open minded when it comes to perspective. With two supportive parents that love him dearly, his life is excellent. But Christopher’s sense of reality takes an unusual twist when his mother is spontaneously ill, and is said to have passed away in the hospital of a heart attack. And to add even more tension to his life, Mrs. Shear’s dog, which lives across the way, has been murdered and Christopher has been mistakenly blamed. To his father’s disapproval, Christopher further investigates the case, discovering not only that his mother may still be alive, but that she lives in London with Mr. Shears. So, he finally decides to make the long treacherous journey alone to London, to try and get away from the one who murdered Wellington, after finding he lives closer to the murderer.
    “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time was a very unique novel. What is most remarkable in the story is Christopher’s perspective and the way in which he handles the different conflicts throughout the story. It makes one realize the little things in which most would overlook, and helps also to appreciate them, which could definitely be considered one of the books inner strengths.
    One of the most significant values I’ve come to learn while reading this book is that no matter who a person is, they have the ability, capability, and potential to overcome any obstacle as long as they put their mind to it. Some would’ve doubted Christopher’s capability of traveling all the way to a foreign and distant city alone. But by being the young, intelligent, curious, and strong man that he has become throughout the course of the novel, he is able to soar past the expectations of modern day society.

    “... I will get a First Class Honors degree and I will become a scientist... And I know I can do this because I went to London on my own, and because I solved the mystery of Who Killed Wellington? and I found my mother and I was brave and I wrote a book and that means I can do anything.”

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 4, 2011

    Eye-Opening, Satisfyingly Puzzling Novel- Must Read!

    Christopher Boone is an autistic 15-year-old living with his father, Ed Boone, in Swindon, England. He despised the color yellow, dislikes being touched, and is gifted in math. As far as he knows, his mother died of a heart problem 2 years earlier. At the start of the book, Christopher finds Eileen Shears' black poodle, Wellington, dead in her front yard, and he sets out to solve the mystery. As Christopher said, "Lots of things are mysteries. But that doesn't mean there isn't an answer to them." When his father finds out what Christopher's up to, he tells him that he needs to cease his investigating, and Christopher promises to do so. However, he ends up breaking his promise, and while searching for information about Wellington, Mrs. Alexander tells him some shocking information about his mother, prior to her untimely death. Surprised and hurt, Christopher just wants to be alone. Throughout Christopher's adventures, he had been writing a book about everything that has happened to him. When his father finds the book, he reads it and confiscates it. Christopher searches for the book when his father isn't home and stumbles upon a series of letters in father's cupboard. When secrets are spilled, Christopher sets of on a journey. As the story unfolds, tension rises, and mysteries are solved. This eye-opening, yet satisfyingly puzzling novel is well written and sure to capture the hearts of all those who read it. The first paragraph was very descriptive, and it made me want to continue reading. This book personally gave me a new view towards adults and how they can be immature and childish at times. I loved the way the book was laid out through Christopher¿s perspective. I think anyone who loves to read should read this book, because I guarantee, they will be hooked immediately.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2011

    Interesting but short book

    I was immediately drawn into this book from the moment I started reading it. The chapters are almost like journal entries, this combined with the first person perspective really kept me interested in the characters and story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    An Entertaining, Fun Book!

    This is a book written from the perspective of a 15 year old boy with autism. The boy decides to write a mystery novel, when he becomes involved in the killing of a neighbor's dog.

    It was interesting to read the book because the main character Christopher had such a unique take on the world around. Everything through his eyes needed to be in a special order for him to understand it, and reading this book helped me to better understand people with autism.

    Also, the story had some great unexpected twists and turns that make it a fun and fast read. I would recommend this book to almost anyone looking for a good book!

    It was definitely better than I thought it would be!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2009

    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

    This book is about a boy named Christopher Boone. Chris has a condition were he remembers his life in vivid details. Chris tries to find out who killed his neighbors dog, Wellington. As Chris tries to solve this mystery new mysteries open up. But due to Chris' condition it is hard for him to solve the mysteries.

    This book is apporpriate for highschool students. It has extensive vocabulary and it is not hard to follow. The book keeps you interested and makes you want to keep reading to see what happens next. While reading this book it teaches you new things. I recommend this book because I enjoyed reading it and it was a great book.





    TYLER

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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