Customer Reviews for

D-Day, June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 65 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2008

    Recommended

    The book D-Day is historically accurate because of all of the research that author Steven Ambrose did before he wrote the book. He interviewed soldiers and sailors that were actually in the battle that day. The book mentions the same lack of preparation on the German¿s part as The American Pageant. Also The American Pageant uses most of the same general descriptions of the generals such as Eisenhower. Also D-Day mentioned how Britain was crowded with more than 3,000,000 allied troops before the battle took place, also mentioned is the German¿s worry about the Allie¿s ability to have almost complete air superiority. The book allows people to interpret the character of people such as Dwight D Eisenhower and Erwin Rommel. Also the book allows people to get a good idea of how the battle actually progressed and of all the events that happened on and leading up to that day. The book describes how the American and British troops prepared for the battle as well as what the Germans did to get ready for the imminent invasion when they built the Atlantic Wall. The book gives the reader only the straight facts about how Eisenhower and Rommel treated their staff and how Hitler and Churchill mentally prepared for the battle. If somebody was to pick up and read this book with limited to no knowledge of Operation Overlord and were eager to learn more about it then they would be pleased. The book will give you a clear understanding of all that happened both politically and militarily in the year leading to the invasion. By the time they finished reading the book they would have a massive amount of specific knowledge that even some history professors would not have. I would recommend this book to anybody that has an interest in WW II as the book gives the reader an understanding of the tactics and weapons that were used by the Americans, British, Germans, and the French Resistance. Also there are little mini biographies of the generals that served in the battle from Eisenhower and Bradley to Rommel. Overall I would give this book a rating of 4/5. The book is a little long and some people might not like that so much.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 14, 2014

    Ambrose┬┐s account of D-Day is a milestone work of vivid, intrica

    Ambrose’s account of D-Day is a milestone work of vivid, intricate planning details leading up to the historic invasion and the agony and halting successes of the wrenching day itself. Launching the invasion was a far cry from what was anticipated, due in large part to cloudy weather that prevented precisely timed bombings and landings. Many plans had to be scrapped completely, while others proceeded with horrendous losses and dispiriting delays. 




    This book brought me into an up-close view of the action, resulting destruction, improvised plans, and wrenching accounts of those directly involved. The scale of the invasion unfolded for hours, shocking German forces that were ultimately worn down by the unrelenting arrivals of airplanes, ships, soldiers, tanks, and supplies. 




    Numerous photos in the book show bits of the unfolding day. Hundreds of quotations from soldiers were gathered and woven smoothly and often dramatically into the story. These are stories of desperate situations, heroism, sacrifice, unspeakable loss, determination, and compassion. The overall story educates and inspires. It brings unforgettably what has been a vague appreciation of D-Day to vivid life. It left me in awe. 




    Earl B. Russell, Author
    Cold Turkey at Nine: The Memoir of a Problem Child

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2014

    Karen

    Highly recommend, great historical piece

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    I have this.

    I have this in paperback it is a well written book.Ps i am 10 years old

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2011

    Long Book/Great History

    D-Day was an important day that turned the tide in WWII. It is impressively captured in this account. This book is quite long, but the preparation and battle information is laid out in such detail that if this interests you, the length won't matter. Stephen E. Ambrose explains how the Allies were preparing for this large-scale attack, including the training methods, and the shipping of troops and supplies to Great Britain. Jokes and humorous moments before the battle make the troops seem a bit more human. All these events keep the reader wanting to move forward. Taking the stories that veterans gave to the WWII memorial museum, Ambrose brings them together to create this giant book. Unfortunately, by the time the actual day of the attack comes about, you might be ready to stop reading. The book picks up though, with all the different battle scenes and locations. With detailed description, Ambrose lays out the entire scene of the invasion of Normandy across the rest of the book. Along with all this information, he lays out some of the effects that the battles had on the war. Not just the beach landing, but also some of the smaller parts of the invasion played the biggest role. If the French had never hid the U.S. paratroopers, Germany would have immediately figured out about the allied attack, and would have sent more troops to fortify the Atlantic Wall. The length of the book lowered the rating, but Ambrose's excellent job with the detail behind each of the critical battles helped keep the book pretty enjoyable. This book is more interesting and has more background than a textbook. If I were to recommend this book to a High Schooler, that person would have to be very diligent and willing to read all 500+ pages of this book. On a whole, the story and records of the attack are excellent, but I think the author dragged the whole story out a bit to longer than necessary. I felt like this book deserved a rating of 85% as a good book on the event the world knows as D-Day.

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  • Posted September 29, 2010

    Put this book on your shelves today...Rick Lauzon.~!~!~!

    Being born in 1946 I was born to a mother who had the burden of caring for my sister who died ...10 years prior to me, and my brother who was born two years prior to myself. My mother would walk the house plans as we were in a low-income low-classed area, my dad, Henry, ("Hank" as he was well known by his friends)was nowhere even close to us and it was showing on our faces daily. I read many things as mom would buy books and puzzles about the world and ourt country. I knew Geography before I was in the Preprimary Grade. I knew who I was as mom taught us our names and where we lived all before dad returned from WW 2. I never knew where he was, but he explained with pictures of the places he was defending "FROM THE JAPANESE" in this war. I took it upon myself to go deeper into the war as I was an avid readerf by time I turned 7 years. I saw a movie about the German part of the war and was very sickened by what I heard. Do NOT let another day go by unless you read parts of this book to your children, as it will advert another "POLICE ACTION" as the Vietnam War was called by politicians at home here in our "FREE" country. You will find this book to be on the top of your research for educating your children as they grow into the next "Police Action" that will cost 57,000 more lives. I have copy ISBN #0-68480137-4; ISBN-13 #978-0-68480137-7;EAN# 9-780684801377. You may prefer to have a small nap before reading to your kids, Tatonka-Mak-Tu...(Rides White Buffalo)

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Out standing

    I bought this book on a recommendation from a friend and I'm glad that I did. My Dad served with the 1St. Infantry Division and his unit was one of the first to land at Omaha Beach. He never talked much about the experience but when he did I became very interested in that operation. This book tells it like it is and the first hand accounts from the Vet's that were interviewed have given me an insight to what my Dad must have gone through. I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn what those brave men did on that day.

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  • Posted July 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    D-Day, June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II

    Chris said the book is fantastic and makes you feel like you really were there on D-Day.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    A great story told sometimes poorly

    Stephen Ambrose painstakingly tells the story of D-Day, the allied invasion of Normandy. Ambrose glorifies the American soldier in this book, particularly the infantrymen of the 29th and 1st Divions at Omaha beach and the Army Rangers, 82nd airborne and the 101st. I thoroughly enjoyed the content of the book, and I appreciate Ambrose¿s passion for our heroes who fought on those beaches. Unfortunately, Ambrose just isn¿t that good of a writer. His book is some kind of awkward combination of a textbook, a narrative history, and individual oral histories with a hint of campaign study to it as well. Ambrose in my opinion just doesn¿t pull it off well. I struggled thought the first 200 pages of the book before the first shot was even fired. Granted, I learned a lot about the pre-war invasion plans I probably would never have known, but it just felt dry and ¿textbookie¿. The book gets better when the allies go into combat. Some of the oral histories are immensely fascinating and worth reading. Ambrose includes the British and Canadian beachheads, as well although not nearly so thoroughly as bloody Omaha. I thought the book¿s coverage of the home front reactions to D-Day was great, and I think it was really cool that the mayor of Philadelphia struck the liberty bell on D-Day. The coverage of the German side was weak, and Ambrose himself alludes to that fact in his Citizen Soldier¿s book when he states that he wanted to include more of the perspectives of the Germans in that book. Despite the shortcomings mentioned previously, this is probably still one of the better books out there on D-Day. I can overlook a lot of poor writing if the author is correct and honest about what he writes and passionate about the story he wants to tell. No one could accuse Ambrose of having no passion.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2004

    May it not need to be repeated?

    Fourteen days after the 60th Anniversary of D-Day I stood on Omaha Beach and visited Cimetiere Americain at Colleville-sur-mer. Experiences that lead me back to my bookshelf to Ambrose's D-Day best seller. I had tried once before to read it and stopped after 100 or so pages. I did that again this year stopping to read 'Public Enemies'. The first 100 pages of this book just are not very well written. But I was determined to read on and it was well worth the effort as the book gets increasingly more interesting as it goes on. Ambrose really has woven together participant oral histories from the Eisenhower Center along with an overview of each aspect of the battle, planning to execution, and a critique of the results. Once your through the book you have a great overall picture of what took place and at least how the survivors tell their stories about it. (It did always enter my mind that no one could tell the story of those who died that day, the one in two in the first wave at Omaha Beach who were experiencing combat for the first time.) This is not a classic and it does dwell a lot on unit names, ranks and stories that seem to have punch line endings, but it is a very memorable telling of this grand and awful day in history. May it not need to be repeated?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2004

    Wonderful account of that day in history!

    Great book and filled with personal accounts of D-Day. It does tend to lean toward the American accounts, but Stephen Ambrose is an American historian after all. It is one of the longer books that I¿ve read. My only complaint is that there are only a handful of maps to show the battles. I often became a bit lost in where a particular town or combat zone was located. Mr. Ambrose gives a historian¿s account of the pre-landing build up and planning on both the Allied and German sides. He also debates the arguments of if the landings were the key defining moment of the war. Also, this book focuses only of the build up and the actual day of June 6th. The majority of the book is about the landings and combat, but it doesn¿t go into any details of actions after the first day. All-in-all, I highly recommend it especially to anyone wanting to read about it for the first time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2004

    America's Greatest Heroes ...Ever!

    This was by far the best book on the subject I have ever read. I could not put it down. However, I paused frequently during my reading to reflect on what I had just read, sometimes tearfully. The author's style provides the ability to put yourself into the text as much as one possibly could. I can not find words sufficient to explain my thanks to these fine men that fought so that I could be free. The best I can do is to teach my children about their ultimate sacrifices and hope and pray that they continue to teach future generations of our family.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    History Alive

    Shots are fired and they rip through the flesh of an unaware soldier, and he falls to the ground all in the name of freedom so that Americans may sleep safely in their beds at night. These were the men that gave their lives on June 6th, 1944; D-Day. In this book Stephen E. Ambrose throws you right in with the GIs. He starts out with the first shots fired early in the morning even before daybreak, and goes into great detail describing not only the lowly privates who took the brunt of the attacks to make this operation successful, but also long profiles of the titans of war, the generals, from both sides. By knowing the strategy and planning involved in the greatest military action ever done, you are immersed in the 24 hours of chaos that turned the tides of World War II. As I have said before Ambrose is amazing at immersion. By using direct quotations from actual soldiers and keen description he puts you into the action. Another angle of his writing I deeply enjoyed was the fact that he showed the day from more than the American side. We get to see the defenders as well as the attackers, and therefore we begin to realize more of the day. Reading this boom makes you feel omnipresent of D-Day. This I feel is one of most pleasurable things of this book. Overall there is next to nothing to critique about this work. The information is solid and interesting and presented well. However at times there are periods where the interest fades and are replace with areas of too much statistical information. Areas of action and personal information are interesting, but when the information or ideas get too technical then the writing becomes flaccid and dull. Despite these minor imperfections the book is otherwise flawless and I would recommend it to anyone who loves history.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2004

    A great book...

    I don't care what some history buffs may say about this book, one of Ambrose's sources is the PRIMARY source of WWII veterans. As we know, stories can be a bit different when told by two different people, but the people that were actually there are the best we've got, next to photographs. Have you ever wondered, 'What if the authors of my history textbooks got something wrong, what if biased opinions tainted historical truth, what if they got information from secondary, or even tertiary sources?'? My point is that history may differ and is very likely to vary from the truth. This can mean that Ambrose has some incorrect information, but it can also mean that the information you may have to compare with is also flawed. I tend to lean on the side of enjoying, and resting assured that Ambrose, a Professor of History, has correct information, coming from over a thousand first-hand accounts of veterans of the war. Ambrose has done me, you, America, a great service in compiling the vast amounts of information into a coherent resource, text-book in quality. This book was worth the $17 I paid for it, and much more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2003

    Unreliable history, and a rehash, poorly told

    Like all Ambrose books, this one is so filled with errors that, in the words of a military analyst 'It belongs on the fiction shelf.' It would require a book in itself to detail all of the misleading and exaggerated and flat out wrong statements Ambrose stuffs into this text. It's even possible that this history may be even more distorted than his Citizen Soldiers fairy tale, if that's possible. I know of no writer of WWII histories who knew less about WWII than Ambrose, the master word thief and plagiarist and chauvinistic king of bombast. He exaggerates absolutely EVERYTHING. His account of D Day, like Undaunted Courage and others, breaks no ground and is a pedestrian account of what was an interesting battle. The Longest Day, although brief, is a far better read, plus being infinitely more accurate and far less bombastic.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2003

    Best Book I have ever read

    Stephen E. Ambrose is masterful in his account of the heroes of D-Day, who fought so gallantly for the freedom we enjoy today. Those with little knowledge of June 6, 1944 will not find D-Day a book that requires extensive knowledge before you begin to read. Ambrose is masterful in his ability to tell a story, while still maintaining the integrity of the book and D-Day as a whole. As you delve deeper into the book, you seem to become a GI in France, running onto Omaha Beach seeing your life flash before your eyes. Stephem E. Ambrose's D-Day is a must read for all history buffs and 'first timers' alike. The book is truly a gem for any library collection.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2003

    Excellent Account

    What a book!! Ambrose brings the day alive, at times you feel like you are parachuting into France, crash landing your glider, or storming the beaches. The best use of oral histories I have ever read. A must read for anyone interested in World War II. For what happens after D-Day, read Citizen Soldiers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2002

    Fantastic Overview of Overlord

    The late Stephen Ambrose has done a masterful job of combining the big picture with that of individual soldiers thrown into the jaws of hell. After visiting Omaha Beach this year, this book is so incredibly meaningful to me as it discusses the very sand where I stood 58 years after the event.For anyone who has plans to visit France, the invasion beaches are a must. Read this book first and again afterward.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2002

    Great detail a must have for World War II history buffs

    From reading this book I though I was in that great invastion on June 6th 1944.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2002

    The history of our freedom

    This book portrays the bravery of our 'greatest generation.' The men that gave their lives to uphold freedom. The numerous accounts Ambrose writes in detail of the beaches of Normandy and the men who we owe so much to. I don't blame these men for not wanting to tell their stories; you would be living with nightmares and visions of blood and death. If that is the price for freedom from tyranny, I give these men all the respect in the world. Ambrose has given me an understanding of every side of the battlefield. The under supplied German forces weren't ready for the allied forces superior power. I believe this book is a great read for everyone, and should be in every school for our younger generations to read about the reality of war. I am a fan of all of all Ambrose¿s writings, but this account of the preparation, and the execution, and the final outcome of the invasion of June 6, 1944. If you want to learn of the real stories of D-DAY, this is a must read. I think many people would agree with me.

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