Customer Reviews for

Eating Out 2: Sloppy Seconds

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    This movie was just as good as the fist Eating Out movie. I wou

    This movie was just as good as the fist Eating Out movie. I would highly recommend this & the first Eating Out Movies. Not so sure about the rest in the series.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Fun Fluff on the Outside, Some Solid Statements on the Inside

    'Eating Out 2: Sloppy Seconds' is a sequel that is not really a sequel - unless the common thread of social attitudes and gender dilemmas as an ongoing tale is the source. A low budget, well scripted, tightly directed (Phillip J. Bartell) little film about gay relationships, attraction blunders, and pretending to be something we aren't (mixed representations that Shakespeare used a lot!) result in a light and ultimately charming little movie. Kyle (Jim Verraros) loves Marc (Brett Chukerman) but tires of Marc's obsession with one-night stands and the relationship is 'over'. Pining Kyle is supported by his two loony girl friends Tiffani (Rebekah Kochan) and Gwen (Emily Brooke Hands), each with gender attraction problems of her own. In an art class taught by flamboyant pseudo-straight Neil (Michael Serrato) the three meet the new nude model Troy (superstud Marco Dapper) and together they hatch a plan to repair Kyle's old damage: Troy for all his demeanor is a bisexual who wants to be straight.... maybe and supplies the key to a game of deceit. The manner in which Kyle fakes a relationship with Tiffani in order to convince Troy to join him in a 'change-over program' (read, get close to him...) leads to a series of hilarious 'go straight' classes and confrontation with parents who play both sides of the 'support our sons' game and leads to a perky ending that just happens to make some comments on perceptions of people, with reality winning. The cast is young (with the exception of Mink Stole and Sarah Lilly, both of whom offer solid professional backgrounds to their roles) and attractive and seems to be having a great time pulling off this light farce. There is plenty of spectacular eye candy (Marco Dapper, Brett Chukerman, Nicholas James, Adrian Quinonez, James Michael Bobby, etc) and the women's roles are kept light and genuine. A great movie it is not, but a fun diversion it most assuredly is. Grady Harp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1