Customer Reviews for

Martian Child

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Martian Child was very touching movie; it was funny in parts and very emotional at times. Love John Cusack, the interactation bewteen the child very excellent. They were both alike in may ways.

    I like that Joan Cusack played his sister in the movie; they are very good together.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Gentle Film That Deserves Wider Attention

    MARTIAN CHILD was marketed incorrectly - that can be the major reason for its lack of success in the theatrical release. While all the multiplex theaters are overflowing with loud, coarse, raunchy, and special effects driven financial successes (with major exceptions, of course!), little meaningful and sensitive films such as this are submerged and don't last long. Should the name of the film have been different? Should the advertisements been better designed? Who knows, but for those who now have the opportunity to buy or rent MARTIAN CHILD, there is a special experience in store. Based on the novel 'The Martian Child' by David Gerrold (beautifully adapted for the screen by Seth Bass and Jonathan Tolins), Director Menno Meyjes has gathered an exceptional cast to present this story about human needs and how we all find security in the warmth of other caring beings. David (John Cusack) is a successful science fiction writer who is a widower, still grieving for his wife. His agent Jeff (Oliver Platt), his sister Liz (Joan Cusack) and his wife's best friend Harlee (Amanda Peet) aid his 'convalescence', but David feels the need for a child. When social worker Sophie (Sophie Okonedo) calls David concerning an available strange little boy Dennis (Bobby Coleman) who believes he is from the planet Mars and hides inside a box, covered with sunscreen and dark glasses, David responds: he, after all, writes science fiction and is attracted to the idea that Dennis believes he is here from Mars on a mission. Against the advice of his practical sister, David agrees to take Dennis home, feeling that he is one of the few who can relate to Dennis' behavior. Life at home is not easy, but with time David and Dennis bond and Dennis comes out of his box to become 'normal'. It is the prolonged journey on which David and Dennis embark that holds the meat of the story. Dennis has been deserted as a small child and finds security in believing he is a visiting Martian who will be 'taken home' to Mars when his mission to understand human beings is complete. David's persistent parenting (quoting Churchill's 'Never ever, ever ,ever, ever, ever give up'), while tested to the extreme, results in a bonding with Dennis that is heart wrenchingly beautiful. And how each of the characters' lives is changed by this extraordinary relationship brings the film to a touching close. In addition to the fine performances by both Cusacks, Peet, Platt, and Okonedo, there are brief but noteworthy cameos by Anjelica Huston and Richard Schiff among others. This is a film that makes a major statement about parenting and single parenting in particular and does so with kindness, tenderness, and sincere emotion. Please see this film. Grady Harp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A quiet film that touches you when you least expect it.

    Martian child is a rarity in today's movies. It's a quiet movie. No loud explosions, car chases, no nudity, and the humor isn't raunchy. The movie is dramatic in it's quietness. Things that otherwise might fade into the background become dramatic moments, and that's good. It's the result of great actors and a great story. Martian Child is about David, a science fiction writer who chooses to adopt a little boy named Dennis who claims to be from Mars. The movie is about the relationship formed between this pair as David tries to come to terms with Dennis' issues, including his almost antisocial behavior, issues that arise from past abandonment and abuse, and Dennis tries to understand David (when the movie opens David is dealing with his own issues of still coming to terms with the death of his wife two years earlier). Through a strange series of events, this boy and this man come to love each other as father and son.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted March 27, 2009

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    Posted May 31, 2009

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