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Running With Scissors

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Oh My God!

    I recently purchased this movie and it has become 1 of my favorite films! It stands as a testament to what we can survive and it exposes the ravages of mental illness at the same time! This film will make you laugh hysterically and seconds later you'll be crying but in the end it's a reminder of just what human beings are capable of getting through! Highly recommended! You'll never hear the words "I want you to make me Hamburger Helper" the same way again!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Humanizing Augusten Burroughs: A Model of Screenplay Adaptation

    For those legions of us who delighted in Augusten Burroughs' sharing of his exceedingly warped childhood in the memoir RUNNING WITH SCISSORS, this book to film transformation will be revelatory and extremely satisfying. Until watching the DVD (not expecting a book of this nature could be successfully molded into a film, much less be a platform for Annette Bening to garner Golden Globe accolades for a role like Deirdre), it is impossible to believe that such a fine book could and is an even better movie. Kudos to writer, director, producer Ryan Murphy for taking a one-person standup comedy book and mold it into a riotously funny and at the same time deeply moving story about the effects of childhood on our personality development. Augusten (first as 6-year old Jack Kaeding and later as brilliantly transformed by the very talented Joseph Cross) is a conflicted child whose mother Deirdre (Annette Bening in an Oscar deserving performance) is a bipolar poet wannabe with delusions of grandeur who drives her alcoholic husband Norman (Alec Baldwin) out of the house, preferring instead to form a lesbian relationship with Fern (Kristin Chenoweth) from one of her wildly dysfunctional poetry groups. Deirdre's psychiatrist Dr. Finch (the always superb Brian Cox) plies her with pills and ultimately is the one to whom Deirdre gives Augusten up for adoption. Finch lives in a grotesque house, but no more absurd than his mad family: his wife Agnes (Jill Clayburgh) eats cat kibbles and appears to be quite mad Hope (Gwyneth Paltrow) is possessed by God and follows holy commands to bury the cat Freud Natalie (Evan Rachel Wood) whose perception of her wild family leads her to be Augusten's ally and Neil Bookman (Joseph Fiennes) a strange dark man who lives in a shed and introduces Augusten to his true sexual identity. In this madhouse Augusten manipulates his way toward understanding adults and free thought, savoring his unusual experiences as fodder for later use, and getting a handle on his own dreams and ultimate escape from his twisted childhood to run off to New York and become a writer! The characters, no matter how bizarre and wacky, each have redeeming values, much to the finessing by Ryan Murphy of Augusten Burroughs' memoir. What could have been a raucous mess of a film Murphy, with Burroughs' blessing, transformed into a sensitive statement about relationships, family, extended family, and the degree that harsh reality can actually supplant the growth of an artist. The cast is uniformly splendid - Annette Bening is amazingly three-dimensional - and the choice of Joseph Cross as Augusten is completely on target for this re-thinking of an impossible book to film. Highly recommended, but do read the book, too! Grady Harp

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    Posted January 1, 2011

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    Posted October 23, 2008

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    Posted October 22, 2008

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    Posted November 7, 2008

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