Customer Reviews for

The Book of Eli

Average Rating 4.5
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 17 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2010

    Highly inspriational and emotional, sends an important message

    How can ratings for Book of Eli not include "emotional" and "inspiring" as applicable. True, Denzel Washington is among the best at creating these two attributes in movies. But, the character of Eli and his purpose, regardless of who plays him, is perhaps the most inspiring individual I've ever seen. It's a travesty that, in today's society, we can't see the pure honor in what motivated him. The message of doing more for others than you would do for yourself, what he learned in his journey, is simple but incredibly powerful and, yes, emotional. The learning of this message was his "journey within the journey".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2011

    Feels like watching a playthrough of Fallout 3

    (from whateverknowsfear dot com)
    The Book of Eli is, for good or ill, a perfect, complete knockoff of Fallout 3 the video game. A Lone Wanderer travels the wastes, carrying with him the secret to restoring a post-apocalyptic world to its former splendor, and a vast assortment of killing implements, all of which he wields with unerring accuracy. Along the way, a tinpot dictator who has carved out a hellish kingdom for himself will attempt to take it for his own personal gain. This will not go well for the dictator, since Eli (a name never actually given to the protagonist) is a certified B.A.M.F.

    The Hughes brothers craft a fairly convincing world, but draw on the conventions far more than creating anew. Shades of Mad Max, The Postman and yes, Fallout 3 color everything, but it's the video game that stands out the most. Whole vistas and literal screenshots seem to have been used to create certain scenes. For those who haven't played the game, they could be viewed as breathtakingly disturbing visions, but as a gamer, they felt cribbed. Standard Post-Apocalyptic movie critiques (Where are their calories coming from if there's no farmland; where is the gasoline/bullet supply coming from?) apply.

    The actors almost seem to be going through the motions, and with blackout glasses required for most scenes, they are unable to tell a story with their eyes. While I completely understand the thematic (and in-universe) reason for the shades on everyone, it does make everyone's job harder. Mila Kunis's huge, expressive eyes are completely wasted, and the standard mooks and rabble are further dehumanized. Visually, the Hughes brothers are as gory as ever, and decapitations and limb-severings abound. Still, a world of unending brown with bombed-out buildings does grow tiresome.

    What amazes is the that the movie plays things so completely, totally straight. There isn't a single joke in the entire movie, and "Eli" is never able to rise above "Penitent Badass" because of it. There isn't a whole lot of plot bones to stretch a story over, and the one meager subplot, brought out 2/3rds of the way through, Rendridge's obsession with Solara isn't really explained as to why it exists, other than to add a meaningless subplot that's never explored and resolved without conflict.

    The ending to this movie contains some sort of ham-handed message about the power of faith and hope, but upon "Eli" and Solara's arrival at Alcatraz the movie devolves into a completely over-the-top, maudlin message-piece and abandons its grittiness for voice-overs and slow fades.

    Ultimately, the Hughes Brothers missed an opportunity to take normal Post-Apoc convention, add their message of faith and then totally subvert it, but either chicken out or are forced into a conventional Big Hollywood Ending that plays in Peoria, but lacks the punch of their brilliant Menace II Society.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Blind Faith

    If you are a person of faith, you will like this film, because it reinforces your religious belief. If not, you will find this film quite awful, particularly if you are a cat lover. The plot is full of holes. The film starts with the hero, Eli, shot and killed a cat, barbecued it, and, just to spite cat lovers, fed a piece to a rat. As the story progresses, viewers start to be aware that Eli was blind, yet he dispatched villains on rooftop with supernatural marksmanship. He got out of a locked windowless room with an armed guard totally undetected, but the viewers have no idea how, because the film never bothered to show the escape. The hero was bullet proof until the end, when it was time for him to be a martyr. The book that Eli carried was the Bible in Braille, but it takes 20 volumes to hold the King James Version in Braille. And the plot holes went on and on. The film is like a glass half full; it just does measure up. For a post-apocalyptic action film, you get better films like "The Road Warrior"; for an intellectually challenging film, you get better films like "The Road." Two Star and I am being generous.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2010

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    Posted October 24, 2010

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    Posted June 18, 2010

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    Posted July 11, 2010

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