Customer Reviews for

The Namesake

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

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3 Star

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2 Star

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Excellent movie, well worth seeing.

    Very good view of Indian/American families and good view into upper class family in Indian. Interesting to see how the parents grew to love each other from their arranged marriage in India. It touched on Father/son relationship and a young man's acceptance of not just his name but also his ethnic background and family life. I love Jumpa Lahiri, she gives a beautiful picture of what it is like to be an Indian/American and the importantance of family history and what it is like to make a new family in an new country.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Cultural Movie

    Although I have not read the book ofthe same name, the movie was quite touching. The story of an Indian couple who move to America and immerse themselves in the culture over their lifetimes. A thoughtful plot that makes you remember why you value your family so much and how important it is to follor your heart in the direction of your dreams. Must-see.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    'We all come out of Gogol's Overcoat'

    Jhumpa Lahiri's very popular novel THE NAMESAKE has been successfully adapted for the screen by Sooni Taraporevala and the gifted director Mira Nair has gathered a fine cast to capture the spirit of the original story of family commitment despite cultural changes and challenges. Some of the novel's impact is lost on the big screen, but the tender message remains at the end. In India a gifted young singer Ashima (Tabu) follows her family's rules of matchmaking and marries the quiet Ashoke (Irfan Khan), and soon after the wedding festivities are over the couple depart to New York for Ashoke's career. The cultural and climate changes are a shock to both, but their marriage soon produces a boy child who, instead of being named traditionally by the grandmother in India, has to have a name assigned in the New York hospital in order to be released with a birth certificate. Out of desperation, Ashoke decides to temporarily name him Gogol (Ashoke's favorite author)-played as a child by Sohan Chatterjee - , and the family of three soon becomes a family of four with the arrival of their daughter Sonia (Sahira Nair). While the parents maintain the customs of their Bengali heritage, the two children struggle with adapting to their preferred life in America and the conflict between parent and child is magnified by the cultural disparities. As young Gogol grows toward manhood (now Kal Penn) he favors Western ways and becomes involved with a non-Indian girl Maxine (Jacinda Barrett) and her family. Gogol tires of the critical comments about his name and decides to change his name to the more traditional Nick- further evidence of his separation from his background. But family tragedies occur and Gogol finds himself drawn to his mother and to his roots. When Gogol's father dies, the significance of his family grows even stronger and being unable to identify with Maxine and her family, he instead agrees to 'date' a Bengali girl from his past - Moushumi (Zuleikha Robinson) has blossomed from the frumpy bookworm into a beautiful and experienced woman. They marry, keeping to Indian traditions, but the marriage is rocky and in the end Gogol discovers that his true happiness is in the rich family history and beauty of his native India. There are moments of rare beauty, both cinematically (camera work is by Frederick Elmes) and emotionally (musical score is a lovely creation by Nitin Sawhney), and while the film is somewhat brittle at times due to the occasional bilingual nature of the script, the main characters are portrayed by such strong actors that the little flaws become unimportant. It is well to have so many films that deal with the immigrant experience at this particular juncture in our history, and when that theme is enhanced by the beauty of authors such as Lahiri, the messages become even more poignant. Grady Harp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Promising, but ultimately, disappointing

    I really enjoyed this movie at first. It showed the trials and tribulations of immigrant families and did a very good job of that. Unfortunately, the director tried to include too much in the film. The story became quite boring after awhile. More like you were watching a video of someone's life. It lacked character development and dramatic tension. The scene where his wife reveals that she is having an affair was terrible. The dialogue was anticlimactic and pathetic. I felt like I had wasted two hours which is sad because I thought the story seemed interesting at first.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    From novel to book

    The book was excellent, the prose beautiful. I was surprised to find it as a movie. It is a wonderful adaptation both the book and the movie are worth the time and effort. The movie takes us from the immigrant experience over two generations and does it quietly, thoughtfully, beautifully and caused me to reflect on my "and my wife's experience"as third generation American Jews. A movie that can both captivate and evoke memory is in my opinion a beauty. Namesake is for those who value character development, understated acting, real emotion and eschew violence, simplicity or the need for distraction. It is broad, deep, and wonderful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    The Namesake is an extrodinary movie! Showing the trials and tibulations of growing up in a family of a different culture. Kal Penn shows off a serious side and does an amazing job playing a character with a lot of internal conflicts. A movie about growing up and growing old, facing fears, and accepting who you are. Can’t reccommed it enough!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

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