Customer Reviews for

Wall Street

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted July 5, 2011

    ANALYSIS OF "Wall Street." DIRECTED BY OLIVER STONE (1987)

    Wall Street is a movie about the corruption of the financial and stock broking in a cosmopolitan place such as New York, in Wall Street. The story is about a young man that shows the ethical side of him, how can be destroyed when he becomes greedy and tries to make money and power by destroying other people's lives economically. The main character of the film story is a young man who is a stockbroker but he admires another person whose name is Gekko as he thinks that this person is something like god and he is gifted to make miracles with other people's money.

    Bud who is a young person always wanted to work for his idol Gekko as he was imaging that one day he would be accompanied by fame and power as him. The same name, Gekko, can be exchanged in the stock market as money because he is the only one who can invest a penny to become a million. He owns many companies, buildings and factories but he feels enthusiastic to move and be heard in the world of money.

    As the story unfolds Bud ends up working for him with full enthusiasm, fulfilment and excitement. As a young boy that comes from a village and gets situated with full of comforts in the big capital and a little more money offered as bonus as he has never seen. Gekko discovers him and tries to show the two sides of life. How life would be with a lot of wealth and power or without it. The case with Bud is that we want from the first moment to be as smart as Gekko and he isn't lured by the money but he sees a new horizon and life opening in frond of him. The whole plot is based that Gekko buys small companies and tries to exploit with his own way the owners for a handful of dollars, which makes him feel superior and always on power. He uses Bud in a mean way and not appropriate to our financial world in order to use any means to know what the moves of the other company holders are and confront them in a difficult economical crisis situation, buy them and get richer. His mediator and pawn in this game of chess as a reflexion of his power will to get more money is his employee Bud.

    The moral of the story is based on how far people can go in order to break not only ethical rules but tacit laws in the human beings, humiliate them, destroy their skills, abilities and ego in return of a few dollars that might end in their pocket. Even today numerous people have managed to use the con-artist method with their behaviour, feelings, thoughts, ideas that they express to their fellow citizens in order to successfully secure just a little bit of a profit from others.

    Finally, the sad part of any story is the end, which stays as bitter as ever. When the whole think is discovered and people can face the reality of what has really happened and the motives they change psychologically completely. It is only when Bud realises the real truth and the game that was played in frond of him and how cleverly was set up to be exploited that he feels that both his image is corrupted and the money that he earned so much time. Sometimes, we are condemned to live with the people that make us feel bad, until we realise that none of us can hide himself under the sun.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    awesome movie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    awesome movie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    WALL STREET Has the Punch of a Heavy Weight Champion!

    The opening moments of the film, from the early morning sun coming up over the Big Apple, to the rush hour traffic moving over the bridge into Manhattan, and topped off with Frank Sinatra singing 'Fly Me to the Moon' in the background, lets viewers know that they are in for a whopper of an enjoyable flick. A sheer 'Wow' of a superb cast, Michael Douglas, Martin Sheen, Charlie Sheen, Daryl Hannah, Hal Holbrook (who utters Mark Twain-type lines like, 'Man looks down into the abyss, and at that moment, man finds character.') delivers the classy screen play with oodles of Pizzazz! Loved it! Don't miss this one!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    This movie really is a Classic...

    This is a classic movie about not taking the easy way out and working hard to make it in life. Bud Fox (played by Charlie Sheen) finds that out the hard way when he teams up with Gordon Gecko (played by Michael Douglas. A classic quote from the speech that Gecko made to the shareholders....''Greed is good''... Another classic quote by Gecko ''Money never sleeps...'' This movie is a must have in your DVD collection. Take care - Chad Castorina

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    ''Coming to Terms with the Middle Class Work Ethic''

    The movie, ''Wall Street,'' sermonizes in the most pedantic fashion against the motto ''Greed is Good'' that presumably fed most of the corporate takeovers, junk bond deals, and corporate dismantling of the 1980's. It does this by following the rise and fall of one Wall Street stockbroker, Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen), who rejects the middle-class work ethic of his father (played by real-life father, Martin Sheen) and opts for the ''get-rich-quick'' schemes of his Wall Street idol, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas). In the course of events, Bud finds that he must choose between Gekko and his father, between high finance and the good old middle-class work ethic, inasmuch as Gekko's plans include the dismantling of his father's business (and pension plan!). Don't look for a balanced assessment of high finance vs. basic job protection here. Notwithstanding this failure, however, the movie does serve to remind us of the human costs always associated with high-stakes corporate finance on Wall Street. What makes the movie particularly worth watching are the fine performances delivered by Michael Douglas and father & son Sheen.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1