Customer Reviews for

The Da Vinci Code

Average Rating 4.5
( 3918 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2442)

4 Star

(863)

3 Star

(304)

2 Star

(134)

1 Star

(175)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

47 out of 62 people found this review helpful.

A real page turner!

There's nothing more I like about a book than its ability to make me want to keep reading and reading. Honestly, there was no good stopping point. I would stop then quickly skim the first line of the next chapter and before I know it, I've read into two more chapters. V...
There's nothing more I like about a book than its ability to make me want to keep reading and reading. Honestly, there was no good stopping point. I would stop then quickly skim the first line of the next chapter and before I know it, I've read into two more chapters. Very entertaining and enjoyable from beginning to end. Loved it!

posted by sbux06 on February 21, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

17 out of 50 people found this review helpful.

The best thing about this book.....

isn't even the book!!!! its these funny reviews! thankyou to the people who've softly criticized brown's misrepresentation of fact, and then providing names to books that may reveal some facts. I dont know the facts, and i may never, but ill do some reading. As for ...
isn't even the book!!!! its these funny reviews! thankyou to the people who've softly criticized brown's misrepresentation of fact, and then providing names to books that may reveal some facts. I dont know the facts, and i may never, but ill do some reading. As for the few that broke blood vessels in their heads writing reviews, who i noticed wrote more than one review, sometimes with less words or more words, who totally blasted brown, get over it. The book is fiction and should be treated so, just like your friggin bible. If brown believes the speculations he brought forth in this book to be true, then let him be. who are you to criticize him, especially you religious people who believe in god. the idea of god is a speculation. oh yea, thats right, its all about faith. Yea, and Rand al'Thor IS the Dragon Reborn and the Millenium Falcon DID blow up the Death Star, in a galaxy, far, far away!! and the Matrix has you!

posted by Anonymous on February 23, 2004

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 41 – 60 of 134 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 3 of 7
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2004

    Badly written but well documented

    The 'Facts' Brown presents are well written and structured and so really generate the illusion of you discovering something new. But the plot is awful and predictable, the characters can´t be any more stereotyped, and the writing techniques are very limited. If you wan't to really enjoy an ocultism-related thriller, go with Umberto Eco's Foucault's Pendulum, which actually seems to have 'inspired' Brown a little bit.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2004

    Fun but disappointing

    After seeing this book spread through the NYC subway like something by JK Rowling, I thought I ought to give it a shot. After all, I was skeptical about Harry Potter, but ended up loving the series. Brown's book is definitely a easy read. I picked the book up on Sunday and finished it three days later. Certainly that's a sign that it is enjoyable. On the other hand, when I finished the book I felt like I had just eaten a meal at a very hyped, very expensive but very ordinary restaurant in Manhattan. It is enjoyable, but ultimately leaves you feeling vaguely unsatisfied. Brown's writing is mediocre with little if any artistic flourish. The puzzles, while interesting at first become quite predictable. By the end, the plot twists are heavy-handed and not entirely believable. The entire time I was reading this book, I thought about the fact that Brown has most likely optioned the rights to 'The Da Vinci Code' movie. No doubt whoever takes on that project will have a good shot a making a profitable film. Here's hoping that someone can take this decent story and make it into something a whole lot more substantial.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2004

    Dull and simplistic

    I read this novel during a holiday in England, and while it is perfect for a laid-back, mindless read, it ends up being far too predictable and simple. None of the 'secrets' of the church that Brown speaks about (Magdaline and Christ having a relationship/children, the coverup/mutation of goddess worship in favor of a more patriarchal religion, etc) are remotely new ideas, nor are treated in a new way. I suppose if I had never read anything about the Knights Templar or any speculative theology, I may have been totally enthralled by the hackneyed concepts this novel utilizes. For my money, Umberto Eco has written the definitive book about these matters with his far more educated, complicated, and fluid Foucault's Pendulum. The fact that I realized The DaVinci Code was a take-off of Eco's book only a few chapters in is pathetic. It was still interesting to see how the author manipulated his audience through the overtly simple puzzles, but never did I find myself wondering over the puzzles as the main characters did. Normally this is called dramatic irony - but with Brown, it is done so badly that it cannot be intentional. In summary: Okay for a beach/holiday read, but if you want serious stuff about any conspiracies surrounding the life of Christ, there are a lot better things out there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2004

    forced reading

    I was very disappointed...it was long, drawn out and who cares about a mythical Holy Grail ?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2004

    Doesn't live up to the hype!

    This book was all hype and no bite. I read this book mainly out of curiousity, and I was disappointed. The first half was very exciting, but then the plot became continuous, long, and boring, and it wrapped itself up badly. I wasn't glad I read it. Another bad thing was that it glorified the 'secret' that it was going to reveal, but the idea it presents isn't a new idea. It was a waste of time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2004

    Great story...VERY poor writing.

    If you don't read much, you might really like this book. I feel like Dan Brown holds the reader's hand and treats us as if we are children. I like a book to be at least SOMEWHAT challenging. I was very disapointed. The plot was creative...and the writing was terrible...the charactors were one dimensional.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2004

    ham-fisted writing and wimpy characters

    What should have been an intelligent caper turned out to be an entirely irritating read. It has all the elements - murder, conspiracy, secret societies, heinous villan, handsome professor, beautiful cop... but comes off so dull! It's nice to see a mainstream novel introduce people to the goddess myth, but Dan Brown, why'ja do it so God-awfully? This story cries out for an Indiana Jones-like hero! Langdon is on the lam with a gorgeous woman and together they hold the key to the most awesome discovery of his career! But he whines about missing his cushy digs at the Ritz and prissily frets that he should've let the Paris police take him into custody. Right, this is a hero worthy of the Holy Grail. This book is riddled with one-dimensional characters, wooden dialogue, and clumsy plot devices. The reports of historical inaccuracies add insult to injury. I can imagine how satisfying the read would be in the far more capable hands of, say, Michael Creighton or Charles McCarry... someone who actually knows how to write a good story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2004

    Not as good as MY FATHER'S EYES

    ' Not when the waters are filthy but when they are shallow doth the discerning one decline to enter.' Nietzsche, from Thus Spake Zarathustra. I give this book two stars because at least Brown can string together interesting sentences. But authors (especially of supposedly 'significant' books) should be more than merely literate. That this book could have enjoyed the success it's enjoyed proves how dimwitted most of us have become. Pretending to be shatteringly significant -- like all conspiracy theories -- it's so intent on it's premise that it willfully misrepresents almost every historical 'fact' it purports to present. This book is the literary equivalent of a car crash ... it's a lot of bang up, excitement, and twisted corpses that makes everyone passing by rubberneck. In the end, though, like most other accidents, it's just a mistake. Try Umberto Eco or Jim Loose for great literature.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2004

    Duh Vinci

    This may have been the preachiest book I have ever read. This book promised thrills and twists, but delivered a lot of propanganda disguised as a mystery. This novel 'novel' amounts to nothing more than a whining diatribe against Catholicism and the Catholic church in general. Now I do think that this is a rather easy and highly appropriate target for criticism, I mean, the Catholic church does have a very terrifying and unholy image. But to decry every action of the Catholics as fueled by mere mysogyny is pretty simplistic and tends to undermine the very points the author was trying to convey. I know this book is fiction and should be taken with the proverbial grain of salt, but it comes off as mere propaganda, it's a work of art like a Michael Moore movie is a work of art. At least Moore uses good examples to back up his arguments. I cannot fathom why Dan Brown kept reverting back to mysogyny every time he felt the need to criticize Catholics. As he called it, 'they wanted to destroy or cover up the female divinity.' I'm not Catholic, but don't Catholics consider their most sacred prayer the Hail Mary? I mean, praying to a woman whom you profess to believe is the mother of your living God suggests to me not only a healthy respect for the female aspect of the divine, but an absolute reverence for her as well. I think it would have been more accurate to claim that every misdeed of the Catolics over the last 2000 years was just groundwork lain to cover up the priest abuse scandals of the last few years. Nice try Dan Brown, but the creators of the film Dogma nailed the Catholic church, now there's a satire that does not try to disguise itself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2004

    A pop approach to the theme..

    We have to remember that this book is, after all, a bestseller...Like the Backstreet boys songs are to the world of music, this book is to literature.. I would reccomend you, if you are interested on this topic, to read Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco. After reading this, reading The Davinci Code will seem like chewing bubblegum for you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2004

    Brown needs to get his facts straight

    This book was interesting, but it was also maddening because of the many times Brown says something is a fact, when in reality he has presented a distortion of fact. As a Christian, I was offended by the blantant attacks on Christianity. The Bible has been shown to be one of the most accurate and reliable of ancient books. When one actually studies the evidence, and considers the Bible honestly and intelligently, it becomes apparent that the theories in The Da Vinci Code are a bunch of hogwash.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2004

    Da Vinci Code: A Novel

    I bought this book soon after it came out, expecting a great intellectual thriller and getting utter disappointment. Dan Brown is a very entertaining writer, but I would not call him a great one. I suppose it depends on if you are applying his writing skills to fun novels or real 'literature.' I found his style interesting but melodramatic. With half-crazed albinos saying menacingly, 'You should not have run,' and 'My work here is done,' and all the hairsbreadth escapes, the dramatic moments seemed more giggle-inducing than chilling to me. In summation, a fun read, but far from the stupendously brilliant one I expected.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2004

    OK, I'm a Killjoy - I Don't Like This Book

    This pop novel has a lot to offer and I am loathe to criticize a work that stimulates intellectual interest, especially in a topic with such depth and significance. This book promised something fresh, not just in the extensive research but also in the character of Sophie. However, the author seems more interested in cramming every single detail his research unearthed than in developing characters and relationships. Teabling, for example, is a cookie-cutter character, a right jolly old elf with a sinister side. More important: Where the plot should unfold in an orderly fashion, the author spends many pages backing up and explaining the plot, as well as offering excuses for the events or twists that seem implausible. Unfortunately, this is what happens when a publisher glosses over the slow but nurturing process of editing. In sections where the writing is lucid, fluid, and elegant-- for example, the descriptions of Paris, which transport the reader, rather than instruct--Mr. Brown proves he has the skill to do better. Perhaps he will.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2004

    Shame, Dan Brown, Shame

    This book is on the top of the bestseller list for a reason: there are a lot of people out there who are secretly attracted to junk novels and yet they don't want to admit to it. 'The Da Vinci Code' is a junk novel cleverly disguised as a highly educated, real-life-conspiracy-based, pretentious novel. But don't let that necessarily put you off. It's an interesting read. Extremely fast-paced, mystery-oriented, action-packed, and full of religious/historical intrigue (even if a good part of it is based on faulty theory). The above things don't necessarily make it a GOOD book. Dan Brown's writing style isn't the most eloquent or metaphorical out there. His characters are there simply as vehicles to propel his plot... and the plot is there simply to put his somewhat far-fetched hypothesis into physical form. There's absolutely no development or dynamic evolution on the part of the characters... a story that rides on plot alone isn't ALWAYS bad, but in this case it is. The critics who claim that Dan Brown is the best thing to come along since Shakespeare are absolutely mad.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2004

    THERE ARE BETTER NOVELS

    After a friend told me about the plot to the DaVinci Code, I was intrigued. Frankly, I have a hard time understanding how this book got to be this popular. The first two chapters are very poor: it is very expositional, with the author explaining things rather than allowing us to get drawn into the story. Some of the revelations are just preposterous. But he does save the worst until last. The entire story disintegrates into a romance novel right out of Daniel Steele. I live in Northern California, where the two hottest books right now are James Dalessandro's incredible re-creation of the great San Francsico earthquake, 1906, and Alexander Greer's The Confessions of Max Tivoli do what great historical fiction should do: take us on an unforgettable journey, so we feel that we are in the middle of a time and a period long past. They are much better novels, as is Robert Harris' Pompeii.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2004

    What's all the Fuss about?

    I can only think of one reason to put this book at the top of your to be read pile- and that's to find out what all the fuss is about. The problem is I still don't know. It's pulp fiction- no better than those paperbacks you see while waiting in line at the grocery store. It was somewhat interesting in parts. The so called facts are sprinkled here and there to make it appear to be an intellectual read- but really it's not. If you must read a Dan Brown book, Angels and Demons is actually more interesting. Better yet, if you are truly interested in a more honest history of the church in a historical fiction format, read some of Stephen R. Lawhead's books. These are more worthy of your reading time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2004

    Anybody but DB

    This book would have been better written by someone other then Dan Brown, I dislike his style alot, so an otherwise interesting book was kind of spoiled.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2004

    looking for a REAL read?

    The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown certinally addresses some interesting subject matter, but thats as far as it goes. After hearing lavish praise for it by many poeple I bought this 'intellectual thriller'. Sadly I discovered very little intellectual mixed in with a large portion of thriller. The writting was shallow and the characters lacked intelligence and depth. I had hoped that The Da Vinci Code would follow in the footstep of a fantastic footsteps of Umberto Eco's Foucault's Pendulum, but I was disapointed. Foucault's Pendulum is a supurb read that is deeply engrossing by way of its vast store of arcane knowledge and its deeply layered plot. For anyone who wants a REAL thriller (one that does not draw comparisions to keep paperback/romance novels) read Umberto Eco!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    A Good Idea Shrouded in Bad Writing

    As somebody with a BA in English, I was shocked and disappointed that a novel as poorly written as The Da Vinci Code could possibly take a spot on the bestseller list. While the novel began with an interesting plot, it quickly became monotonous and predictable. It is sad to think that because of Brown's efforts to present his novel as fact, many people are now accepting his story as truth. I am in no way defending Christianity (the Bible is as much fiction as the Da Vinci Code), but it is a tragedy that a piece of badly written fiction can be so misleading to the naive masses. For a more enlightening diatribe against Christianity and the Catholic Church, read Tom Robbins' Another Roadside Attraction.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    Much Ado About Nothing

    This is probably one of the most frustrating and over-rated books I have ever read. Under the guise of a mystery novel, author Dan Brown, an obvious atheist, seeks to undermine the underpinnings of the Christian religion with a fantastic tale suggesting that Jesus and Mary Magdeline were married and had children, and that they have relatives even living today! The premise, of course, also leads to the conclusion that Jesus never was crucified -- an historical fact, hardly even questioned even by non-Christians today -- and, of course never rose from the dead -- another proven fact. (Read 'The Case For Christ' by former atheist, Lee Strobel, award-winning journalist and attorney). The Christian faith, of course, has outlived and refuted similar fables in the past and will continue to do so. If the readers of this book really want to find out the truth about Jesus and Mary Magdeline, I would suggest they spend a couple of hours viewing Mel Gibson's 'The Passion Of The Christ.' That's not fiction. It's biography.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 41 – 60 of 134 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 3 of 7