Customer Reviews for

Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA, Enlarged and Revised Edition

Average Rating 3.5
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Mission Accomplished

Dark Mission immerses the reader in a reality where an extremely advanced ancient civilization left its remains on earth, the moon, and mars. High level initiates of secret societies operate through the highest levels of NASA and other U.S. and world organizations to f...
Dark Mission immerses the reader in a reality where an extremely advanced ancient civilization left its remains on earth, the moon, and mars. High level initiates of secret societies operate through the highest levels of NASA and other U.S. and world organizations to fill in the gaps of their partial knowledge of humanity¿s true heritage. By ritually utilizing the ancient¿s message of hyperdimensional physics, they aim to resurrect the ancient link between the stellar and the terrestrial. ¿Chapter 5: A Conspiracy Unfolds¿ is one of the highlights of the book. Well-written and perfectly paced, an adventure begins with the ancient Egyptian concepts of Osiris, Isis, Set, and Horus. This serves as a background strand that continually links the various developments of the entire space program. The roles of Aleister Crowley, Jack Parsons, Buzz Aldrin, Vannevar Bush, Wernher Von Braun, Adolf Hitler, Farouk El-Baz, Walt Disney, L. Ron Hubbard, and many others are presented with twists and turns that edify the reader at every junction. Freemasons, Rosicruicians, Nazis, and the OTO host this cast of characters as NASA is born and bred from the combination of occult wisdom, arcane knowledge, scientific development, and a host of bizarre actions. This chapter has something to offer everyone, and is alone worth the price of the book. The book does have some shortcomings. Readers without a technical background must strap themselves in for a tour through hyperdimensional physics, torsion fields, and the J.F.K. mystery before getting to the artifacts on the moon and the insightful chapter 5. The book¿s ensuing thorough coverage of the details is perhaps a necessary distraction. Hoagland has a point to prove, and drives it home with conviction and evidence. The book could perhaps have been presented in a different order where the climactic conclusions in the epilogue were presented first, then followed by the formation of NASA, and finally by the other elements that the book presents. A lot of the technical details regarding image processing could have been relegated to an appendix chapter. The book sometimes loses focus as to whether it is written for readers that have an intricate knowledge of the subject material, or whether it is aiming for the person who is unfamiliar with the controversies and has never visited Hoagland¿s enterprise mission website. This is understandable, though, given the depth, complexity, and sheer variety of the material. If the reader is not familiar with terms such as the D & M Pyramid, the tetrahedral latitude of 19.5 degrees, the 33rd degree, and glass structures on the moon, then this book will introduce the reader to the subject. The text also has many new details to offer those who are already familiar with the authors¿ work. They show how NASA has intentionally shifted the color of mars photos to make the Martian sky appear red instead of blue, and that is just the beginning of the revelations contained in this volume that is full of both color and black and white photos. Anyone who reads this book will, at the very least, look up at the sky and wonder if there really are the remains of an ancient, hi-tech base up there on the moon. And even more mysteriously, are there really vast remains, including a face monument on mars starring down at them, that some insiders have long since known about and concealed for reasons that the authors can only speculate.

posted by Anonymous on October 27, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

This book is rubbish

This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224...
This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224 Richard Hoagland describes himself as a scientist, but this is, in common with most of its context, arrogant nonsense.

If you, too, are a NASA-hater, you'll probably enjoy this book and you probably won't care that it is factually wrong at every turn. If you're a more moderate observer of spaceflight and planetary/lunar science, you can most likely guess that this would be a waste of your money.

The corner-flash on the front cover proclaims this second edition to be "REVISED & EXPANDED," but this is an empty claim. None of the many, many errors of fact in the first edition of this wretchedly-edited work have been corrected -- on the contrary, a few have been added in the new introductory passages. The 48 introductory pages are the only part of the edition that is in any sense "expanded" -- the body of the book is exactly as the first edition. Shameful.

Disregarding the many, many errors committed by the authors, I have a bone -- a whole skeleton -- to pick with its publisher, Adam Parfrey of Feral House.

* In the book's announcement on Amazon, we are told "Authors Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara include a new chapter about the discoveries made by ex-Nazi scientist and NASA stalwart Wernher von Braun regarding what he termed 'alternate gravitational solutions.'" There is no such chapter, and that's perhaps a blessing since the mathematics underlying Hoagland's thesis he calls "Von Braun's Secret" is hopelessly, irretrievably, fatally, WRONG.

* Also in the announcement, we are told "Buyers of the new edition will be provided a code that will enable them to log on to DarkMission.net to download hundreds of images discussed within the book." Well, I'm a buyer and I've been given no such code. We wuz robbed.

It would have been welcome, since the quality of monochrome photo-repro is only marginally better than that of the first edition. That is to say, it has improved from abysmal to unacceptable.

* In the publishing world, I think we can all accept that there's a good economic reason for inserting color art as a separate signature, a practice that Parfrey follows here. But why did he find it possible to use inline monochrome illustrations in the Introduction, yet pushed all other art to the end of each chapter, forcing the reader to flip forward at every figure reference?

* Errata are inevitable in publishing -- they happen to the best of us. After the first edition, an official list of errata was provided -- 29 items, not too bad for a work of over 500 pages. But second editions are the opportunity to make these good, and in this respect Adam Parfrey is a dismal failure. There are uncorrected errata on pages 131,145,178,215,278,286,312,320,386(2),430 (all using 2nd edition pagination.) This is inexcusable.

* There is still no index, in a book with tortuous references to many individuals who are important in the long history of NASA's conspiracy against Richard Hoagland. Indexing would have cost about $2000. Considering the 1st edition sold over 50,000, Parfrey could have afforded it.

posted by Gavin_F on September 23, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted September 23, 2009

    This book is rubbish

    This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224 Richard Hoagland describes himself as a scientist, but this is, in common with most of its context, arrogant nonsense.

    If you, too, are a NASA-hater, you'll probably enjoy this book and you probably won't care that it is factually wrong at every turn. If you're a more moderate observer of spaceflight and planetary/lunar science, you can most likely guess that this would be a waste of your money.

    The corner-flash on the front cover proclaims this second edition to be "REVISED & EXPANDED," but this is an empty claim. None of the many, many errors of fact in the first edition of this wretchedly-edited work have been corrected -- on the contrary, a few have been added in the new introductory passages. The 48 introductory pages are the only part of the edition that is in any sense "expanded" -- the body of the book is exactly as the first edition. Shameful.

    Disregarding the many, many errors committed by the authors, I have a bone -- a whole skeleton -- to pick with its publisher, Adam Parfrey of Feral House.

    * In the book's announcement on Amazon, we are told "Authors Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara include a new chapter about the discoveries made by ex-Nazi scientist and NASA stalwart Wernher von Braun regarding what he termed 'alternate gravitational solutions.'" There is no such chapter, and that's perhaps a blessing since the mathematics underlying Hoagland's thesis he calls "Von Braun's Secret" is hopelessly, irretrievably, fatally, WRONG.

    * Also in the announcement, we are told "Buyers of the new edition will be provided a code that will enable them to log on to DarkMission.net to download hundreds of images discussed within the book." Well, I'm a buyer and I've been given no such code. We wuz robbed.

    It would have been welcome, since the quality of monochrome photo-repro is only marginally better than that of the first edition. That is to say, it has improved from abysmal to unacceptable.

    * In the publishing world, I think we can all accept that there's a good economic reason for inserting color art as a separate signature, a practice that Parfrey follows here. But why did he find it possible to use inline monochrome illustrations in the Introduction, yet pushed all other art to the end of each chapter, forcing the reader to flip forward at every figure reference?

    * Errata are inevitable in publishing -- they happen to the best of us. After the first edition, an official list of errata was provided -- 29 items, not too bad for a work of over 500 pages. But second editions are the opportunity to make these good, and in this respect Adam Parfrey is a dismal failure. There are uncorrected errata on pages 131,145,178,215,278,286,312,320,386(2),430 (all using 2nd edition pagination.) This is inexcusable.

    * There is still no index, in a book with tortuous references to many individuals who are important in the long history of NASA's conspiracy against Richard Hoagland. Indexing would have cost about $2000. Considering the 1st edition sold over 50,000, Parfrey could have afforded it.

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Makes an excellent gift for someone you don't like

    This book is a painful read. If you read it with an open mind it shows just how far people will go to show how everything is a conspiracy of some sort. The book draws wild and unsupported conclusions that are so far fetched that even someone who wants to believe in the possibility of life beyond this planet has to question the author. If you are looking for a book to help you believe or expand your horizons you should look elsewhere. I really wish I could get the time I spent reading this book back.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    This book is rubbish

    This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224 Richard Hoagland describes himself as a scientist, but this is, in common with most of its context, arrogant nonsense.If you, too, are a NASA-hater, you'll probably enjoy this book and you probably won't care that it is factually wrong at every turn. If you're a more moderate observer of spaceflight and planetary/lunar science, you can most likely guess that this would be a waste of your money.The corner-flash on the front cover proclaims this second edition to be "REVISED & EXPANDED," but this is an empty claim. None of the many, many errors of fact in the first edition of this wretchedly-edited work have been corrected -- on the contrary, a few have been added in the new introductory passages (such as Mike Bara petulantly describing Dwayne Day inaccurately as a "shameless hack" who "has so many NASA connections on his resume [sic] that he may as well be an official press officer for the agency.") The 48 introductory pages are the only part of the edition that is in any sense "expanded" -- the body of the book is exactly as the first edition. Shameful.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1